• We show that, contrary to popular belief, non only diffraction-free beams may reconstruct themselves after hitting an opaque obstacle but also, for example, Gaussian beams. We unravel the mathematics and the physics underlying the self-reconstruction mechanism and we provide for a novel definition for the minimum reconstruction distance beyond geometric optics, which is in principle applicable to any optical beam that admits an angular spectrum representation. Moreover, we propose to quantify the self-reconstruction ability of a beam via a newly established degree of self-healing. This is defined via a comparison between the amplitudes, as opposite to intensities, of the original beam and the obstructed one. Such comparison is experimentally accomplished by tailoring an innovative experimental technique based upon Shack-Hartmann wave front reconstruction. We believe that these results can open new avenues in this field.
  • A circularly polarized electromagnetic plane wave carries an electric field that rotates clockwise or counterclockwise around the propagation direction of the wave. According to the handedness of this rotation, its \emph{longitudinal} spin angular momentum density is either parallel or antiparallel to the propagation of light. However, there are also light waves that are not simply plane and carry an electric field that rotates around an axis perpendicular to the propagation direction, thus yielding \emph{transverse} spin angular momentum density. Electric field configurations of this kind have been suggestively dubbed "photonic wheels". It has been recently shown that photonic wheels are commonplace in optics as they occur in electromagnetic fields confined by waveguides, in strongly focused beams, in plasmonic and evanescent waves. In this work we establish a general theory of electromagnetic waves {propagating along a well defined direction, which carry} transverse spin angular momentum density. We show that depending on the shape of {these waves, the} spin density may be either perpendicular to the \emph{mean} linear momentum (globally transverse spin) or to the linear momentum \emph{density} (locally transverse spin). We find that the latter case generically occurs only for non-diffracting beams, such as the Bessel beams. Moreover, we introduce the concept of \emph{meridional} Stokes parameters to operationally quantify the transverse spin density. To illustrate our theory, we apply it to the exemplary cases of Bessel beams and evanescent waves. These results open a new and accessible route to the understanding, generation and manipulation of optical beams with transverse spin angular momentum density.
  • We present the quantum theory of the measurement of bosonic particles by multipixel detectors. For the sake of clarity, we specialize on beams of photons. We study the measurement of different spatial beam characteristics, as position and width. The limits of these measurements are set by the quantum nature of the light field. We investigate how both, detector imperfections and finite pixel size affect the photon counting distribution. An analytic theory for the discretized measurement scheme is derived. We discuss the results and compare them to the theory presented by Chille et al. in "Quantum uncertainty in the beam width of spatial optical modes," Opt. Express 23, 32777 (2015), which investigates the beam width noise independently of the measurement system. Finally, we present numerical simulations which furnish realistic and promising predictions for possible experimental studies.
  • In nonrelativistic quantum mechanics the spontaneous generation of singularities in smooth and finite wave functions, is a well understood phenomenon also occurring for free particles. We use the familiar analogy between the two-dimensional Schroedinger equation and the optical paraxial wave equation to define a new class of square-integrable paraxial optical fields which develop a spatial singularity in the focal point of a weakly-focusing thin lens. These fields are characterized by a single real parameter whose value determines the nature of the singularity. This novel field enhancement mechanism may stimulate fruitful researches for diverse technological and scientific applications.
  • Quantum mechanics represents one of the greatest triumphs of human intellect and, undoubtedly, is the most successful physical theory we have to date. However, since its foundation about a century ago, it has been uninterruptedly the center of harsh debates ignited by the counterintuitive character of some of its predictions. The subject of one of these heated discussions is the so-called "retrodiction paradox", namely a deceptive inconsistency of quantum mechanics which is often associated with the "measurement paradox" and the "collapse of the wave function"; it comes from the apparent time-asymmetry between state preparation and measurement. Actually, in the literature one finds several versions of the retrodiction paradox; however, a particularly insightful one was presented by Sir Roger Penrose in his seminal book \emph{The Road to Reality}. Here, we address the question to what degree Penrose's retrodiction paradox occurs in the classical and quantum domain. We achieve a twofold result. First, we show that Penrose's paradox manifests itself in some form also in classical optics. Second, we demonstrate that when information is correctly extracted from the measurements and the quantum-mechanical formalism is properly applied, Penrose's retrodiction paradox does not manifest itself in quantum optics.
  • We present an experimental method for the generation of amplitude squeezed high-order vector beams. The light is modified twice by a spatial light modulator such that the vector beam is created by means of a collinear interferometric technique. A major advantage of this approach is that it avoids systematic losses, which are detrimental as they cause decoherence in continuous-variable quantum systems. The utilisation of a spatial light modulator (SLM) gives the flexibility to switch between arbitrary mode orders. The conversion efficiency with our setup is only limited by the efficiency of the SLM. We show the experimental generation of Laguerre-Gauss (LG) modes with radial indices up to 1 and azimuthal indices up to 3 with complex polarization structures and a quantum noise reduction up to -0.9dB$\pm$0.1dB. The corresponding polarization structures are studied in detail by measuring the spatial distribution of the Stokes parameters.
  • As the generation of squeezed states of light has become a standard technique in laboratories, attention is increasingly directed towards adapting the optical parameters of squeezed beams to the specific requirements of individual applications. It is known that imaging, metrology, and quantum information may benefit from using squeezed light with a tailored transverse spatial mode. However, experiments have so far been limited to generating only a few squeezed spatial modes within a given setup. Here, we present the generation of single-mode squeezing in Laguerre-Gauss and Bessel-Gauss modes, as well as an arbitrary intensity pattern, all from a single setup using a spatial light modulator (SLM). The degree of squeezing obtained is limited mainly by the initial squeezing and diffractive losses introduced by the SLM, while no excess noise from the SLM is detectable at the measured sideband. The experiment illustrates the single-mode concept in quantum optics and demonstrates the viability of current SLMs as flexible tools for the spatial reshaping of squeezed light.
  • Tracking the kinematics of fast-moving objects is an important diagnostic tool for science and engineering. Existing optical methods include high-speed CCD/CMOS imaging, streak cameras, lidar, serial time-encoded imaging and sequentially timed all-optical mapping. Here, we demonstrate an entirely new approach to positional and directional sensing based on the concept of classical entanglement in vector beams of light. The measurement principle relies on the intrinsic correlations existing in such beams between transverse spatial modes and polarization. The latter can be determined from intensity measurements with only a few fast photodiodes, greatly outperforming the bandwidth of current CCD/CMOS devices. In this way, our setup enables two-dimensional real-time sensing with temporal resolution in the GHz range. We expect the concept to open up new directions in photonics-based metrology and sensing.
  • Complete determination of the polarisation state of light requires at least four distinct projective measurements of the associated Stokes vector. Stability of state reconstruction, however, hinges on the condition number $\kappa$ of the corresponding instrument matrix. Optimisation of redundant measurement frames with an arbitrary number of analysis states, $m$, is considered in this Letter in the sense of minimisation of $\kappa$. The minimum achievable $\kappa$ is analytically found and shown to be independent of $m$, except for $m=5$ where this minimum is unachievable. Distribution of the optimal analysis states over the Poincar\'e sphere is found to be described by spherical 2-designs, including the Platonic solids as special cases. Higher order polarisation properties also play a key role in nonlinear, stochastic and quantum processes. Optimal measurement schemes for nonlinear measurands of degree $t$ are hence also considered and found to correspond to spherical $2t$-designs, thereby constituting a generalisation of the concept of mutually unbiased bases.
  • Teleportation is the most widely discussed application of the basic principles of quantum mechanics. Fundamentally, this process describes the transmission of information, which involves transport of neither matter nor energy. The implicit assumption, however, is that this scheme is of inherently nonlocal nature, and therefore exclusive to quantum systems. Here, we show that the concept can be readily generalized beyond the quantum realm. We present an optical implementation of the teleportation protocol solely based on classical entanglement between spatial and modal degrees of freedom, entirely independent of nonlocality. Our findings could enable novel methods for distributing information between different transmission channels and may provide the means to leverage the advantages of both quantum and classical systems to create a robust hybrid communication infrastructure.
  • We test the validity of Feynman's idea that a two-slit experiment performed with classical objects (bullets) does not produce observable interference fringes on the detection screen because the Compton's wavelength of the bullets is so tiny, that no real detector could resolve individual interference fringes, thus producing only an average signal which is the observed smooth curve. To test this idea, we study the two-slit experiment in two different situations using light to simulate both wave-like and particle-like bullets. In the first case, we consider coherent light with short wavelengths and in the second case incoherent light with not-so-short wavelength. While in the former case (simulating Feynman's wave-like bullets) the interference fringes are so dense that they cannot be resolved by a detector, therefore resulting in an averaged smooth signal, in the latter case (simulating Feynman's particle-like bullets), although the detector is fully capable of discriminating each fringe, the observed classical smooth pattern limit is produced because of the lack of spatial coherence of the impinging field.
  • We theoretically investigate the quantum uncertainty in the beam width of transverse optical modes and, for this purpose, define a corresponding quantum operator. Single mode states are studied as well as multimode states with small quantum noise. General relations are derived, and specific examples of different modes and quantum states are examined. For the multimode case, we show that the quantum uncertainty in the beam width can be completely attributed to the amplitude quadrature uncertainty of one specific mode, which is uniquely determined by the field under investigation. This discovery provides us with a strategy for the reduction of the beam width noise by an appropriate choice of the quantum state.
  • In the helicity representation, the Poynting vector (current) for a monochromatic optical field, when calculated using either the electric or the magnetic field, separates into right-handed and left-handed contributions, with no cross-helicity contributions. Cross-helicity terms do appear in the orbital and spin contributions to the current. But when the electric and magnetic formulas are averaged ('electric-magnetic democracy'), these terms cancel, restoring the separation into right-handed and left-handed currents for orbital and spin separately.
  • In this work we investigate the role of the beam astigmatism in the Goos-H\"anchen and Imbert-Fedorov shift. As a case study, we consider a Gaussian beam focused by an astigmatic lens and we calculate explicitly the corrections to the standard formulas for beam shifts due to the astigmatism induced by the lens. Our results show that astigmatism may enhance the angular part of the shift.
  • It has been known for a long time that light carries both linear and angular momenta parallel to the direction of propagation. However, only recently it has been pointed out that beams of light, under certain conditions, may exhibit a transverse spin angular momentum perpendicular to the propagation direction. When this happens, the electric field transported by the light rotates around an axis transverse to the beam path. Such kind of fields, although deceptively elusive, are almost ubiquitous in optics as they manifests in strongly focused beams, plasmonic fields and evanescent waves. In this work we present a general formalism describing all these phenomena. In particular, we demonstrate how to mathematically generate a wave field possessing transverse spin angular momentum density, from any arbitrarily given scalar wave field, either propagating and evanescent.
  • Contrarily to a common belief, any beam of light possesses to a some extent the ability to "reconstruct itself" after hitting an obstacle. The celebrated Arago spot phenomenon is nothing but a manifestation of this property. In this work we analyze the self-healing mechanism from both a mathematical and a physical point of view, eventually finding a new expression for the minimum reconstruction distance, which is valid for \emph{any} kind of beam, including Gaussian ones. Finally, a witness function that quantify the self-reconstruction capability of a beam is proposed and tested. The results presented here help clarifying the physics underlying self-healing mechanism in optical beams.
  • We present a theoretical analysis for the \GH and \IF shifts experienced by an X-wave upon reflection from a dielectric interface. We show that the temporal chirp, as well as the bandwidth of the X-wave directly affect the spatial shifts in a way that can be experimentally observed, while the angular shifts do not depend on the spectral features of the X-Wave. A dependence of the spatial shifts on the spatial structure of the X-wave is also discussed.
  • This work is the second part of an investigation aiming at the study of optical wave equations from a field-theoretic point of view. Here, we study classical and quantum aspects of scalar fields satisfying the paraxial wave equation. First, we determine conservation laws for energy, linear and angular momentum of paraxial fields in a classical context. Then, we proceed with the quantization of the field. Finally, we compare our result with the traditional ones.
  • In this work we review and further develop the controversial concept of "classical entanglement" in optical beams. We present a unified theory for different kinds of light beams exhibiting classical entanglement and we indicate several possible extensions of the concept. Our results shed new light upon the physics at the debated border between the classical and the quantum representations of the world.
  • We study monochromatic, scalar solutions of the Helmholtz and paraxial wave equations from a field-theoretic point of view. We introduce appropriate time-independent Lagrangian densities for which the Euler-Lagrange equations reproduces either Helmholtz and paraxial wave equations with the $z$-coordinate, associated with the main direction of propagation of the fields, playing the same role of time in standard Lagrangian theory. For both Helmholtz and paraxial scalar fields, we calculate the canonical energy-momentum tensor and determine the continuity equations relating "energy" and "momentum" of the fields. Eventually, the reduction of the Helmholtz wave equation to a useful first-order Dirac form, is presented. This work sheds some light on the intriguing and not so acknowledged connections between angular spectrum representation of optical wavefields, cosmological models and physics of black holes.
  • We generate tightly focused optical vector beams whose electric fields spin around an axis transverse to the beams' propagation direction. We experimentally investigate these fields by exploiting the directional near-field interference of a dipole-like plasmonic field probe, placed adjacent to a dielectric interface, which depends on the transverse electric spin density of the excitation field. Near- to far-field conversion mediated by the dielectric interface enables us to detect the directionality of the emitted light in the far-field and, therefore, to measure the transverse electric spin density with nanoscopic resolution. Finally, we determine the longitudinal electric component of Belinfante's elusive spin momentum density, a solenoidal field quantity often referred to as 'virtual'.
  • Bessel beams' great importance in optics lies in that these propagate without spreading and can reconstruct themselves behind an obstruction placed across their path. However, a rigorous wave-optics explanation of the latter property is missing. In this work we study the reconstruction mechanism by means of a wave-optics description. We obtain expressions for the minimum distance beyond the obstruction at which the beam reconstructs itself, which are in close agreement with the traditional one determined from geometrical optics. Our results show that the physics underlying the self-healing mechanism can be entirely explained in terms of the propagation of plane waves with radial wave vectors lying on a ring.
  • We present a study of radially and azimuthally polarized Bessel-Gauss beams in both the paraxial and nonparaxial regimes. We discuss the validity of the paraxial approximation and the form of the nonparaxial corrections for Bessel-Gauss beams. We show that, independently from the ratio between the Bessel aperture cone angle $\vartheta_0$ and the Gauss beam divergence $\theta_0$, the nonparaxial corrections are always very small and therefore negligible. Explicit expressions for the nonparaxial vector electric field components are also reported.
  • We discuss how to implement the Legendre transform using the Faddeev-Popov method of Quantum Field Theory. By doing this, we provide an alternate way to understand the essence of the Faddeev-Popov method, using only concepts that are very familiar to the students (such as the Legendre transform), and without needing any reference to Quantum Field Theory. Two examples of Legendre transform calculated with the Faddeev-Popov method are given to better clarify the point.
  • Numerical evolutions of whispering gallery modes of both isotropic and anisotropic spheroidal resonators are presented and used to build analytical approximations of these modes. Such approximations are carried out mainly to have the possibility to have a manageable analytic formulas for the eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies of anisotropic resonators. A qualitative analysis of ellipsoidal anisotropic modes in term of superposition of spherical modes is also presented.