• We constrain the stellar population properties of a sample of 52 massive galaxies, with stellar mass $\log M_s/M_\odot>10.5$, over the redshift range 0.5<z<2 by use of observer-frame optical and near-infrared slitless spectra from Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 grisms. The deep exposures allow us to target individual spectra of massive galaxies to F160W=22.5AB. Our fitting approach uses a set of six base models adapted to the redshift and spectral resolution of each observation, and fits the weights of the base models via a MCMC method. The sample comprises a mixed distribution of quiescent (19) and star-forming galaxies (33). Using the cumulative distribution of stellar ages by mass, we define a "quenching timescale" that is found to correlate with stellar mass. The other population parameters, aside from metallicity, do not show such a strong correlation, although all display the characteristic segregation between quiescent and star-forming populations. Radial colour gradients within each galaxy are also explored, finding a wider scatter in the star-forming subsample, but no conclusive trend with respect to the population parameters. Environment is also studied, with at most a subtle effect towards older ages in high-density environments.
  • Detecting galaxies when their star-formation is being quenched is crucial to understand the mechanisms driving their evolution. We identify for the first time a sample of quenching galaxies selected just after the interruption of their star formation by exploiting the [O III]5007/Halpha ratio and searching for galaxies with undetected [O III]. Using a sample of ~174000 star-forming galaxies extracted from the SDSS-DR8 at 0.04 < z < 0.21,we identify the ~300 quenching galaxy best candidates with low [O III]/Halpha, out of ~26000 galaxies without [O III] emission. They have masses between 10^9.7 and 10^10.8 Mo, consistently with the corresponding growth of the quiescent population at these redshifts. Their main properties (i.e. star-formation rate, colours and metallicities) are comparable to those of the star-forming population, coherently with the hypothesis of recent quenching, but preferably reside in higher-density environments.Most candidates have morphologies similar to star-forming galaxies, suggesting that no morphological transformation has occurred yet. From a survival analysis we find a low fraction of candidates (~0.58% of the star-forming population), leading to a short quenching timescale of tQ~50Myr and an e-folding time for the quenching history of tauQ~90Myr, and their upper limits of tQ<0.76 Gyr and tauQ<1.5Gyr, assuming as quenching galaxies 50% of objects without [O III] (~7.5%).Our results are compatible with a 'rapid' quenching scenario of satellites galaxies due to the final phase of strangulation or ram-pressure stripping. This approach represents a robust alternative to methods used so far to select quenched galaxies (e.g. colours, specific star-formation rate, or post-starburst spectra).
  • The expansion history of the Universe can be constrained in a cosmology-independent way by measuring the differential age evolution of cosmic chronometers. This yields a measurement of the Hubble parameter as a function of redshift. The most reliable cosmic chronometers known so far are extremely massive and passively evolving galaxies. Age-dating these galaxies is, however, a difficult task, and even a small contribution of an underlying young stellar population ("frosting") could, in principle, affect the age estimate and its cosmological interpretation. We present several spectral indicators to detect, quantify and constrain such a young component in old galaxies, and study how their combination can be used to maximize the purity of cosmic chronometers selection. In particular, we analyze the CaII H/K ratio, and the presence (or absence) of H$\alpha$ and [OII] emission lines, higher order Balmer absorption lines, and UV flux; each indicator is especially sensitive to a particular age range, allowing us to detect young components ranging between 10 Myr and 1 Gyr. The combination of these indicators minimizes the contamination below the 1% level, and offers a way to control the systematic error it could introduce in the Hubble parameter determination. We show that for our previous measurements this effect is well below the current errors. We envision that these indicators will be instrumental in strengthening the selection criterion of cosmic chronometers, paving the road for a robust and reliable dating of the old population and its cosmological interpretation.
  • We improve the accuracy of photometric redshifts by including low-resolution spectral data from the G102 grism on the Hubble Space Telescope, which assists in redshift determination by further constraining the shape of the broadband Spectral Energy Disribution (SED) and identifying spectral features. The photometry used in the redshift fits includes near-IR photometry from FIGS+CANDELS, as well as optical data from ground-based surveys and HST ACS, and mid-IR data from Spitzer. We calculated the redshifts through the comparison of measured photometry with template galaxy models, using the EAZY photometric redshift code. For objects with F105W $< 26.5$ AB mag with a redshift range of $0 < z < 6$, we find a typical error of $\Delta z = 0.03 * (1+z)$ for the purely photometric redshifts; with the addition of FIGS spectra, these become $\Delta z = 0.02 * (1+z)$, an improvement of 50\%. Addition of grism data also reduces the outlier rate from 8\% to 7\% across all fields. With the more-accurate spectrophotometric redshifts (SPZs), we searched the FIGS fields for galaxy overdensities. We identified 24 overdensities across the 4 fields. The strongest overdensity, matching a spectroscopically identified cluster at $z=0.85$, has 28 potential member galaxies, of which 8 have previous spectroscopic confirmation, and features a corresponding X-ray signal. Another corresponding to a cluster at $z=1.84$ has 22 members, 18 of which are spectroscopically confirmed. Additionally, we find 4 overdensities that are detected at an equal or higher significance in at least one metric to the two confirmed clusters.
  • ATLAS (Astrophysics Telescope for Large Area Spectroscopy) Probe is a concept for a NASA probe-class space mission, the spectroscopic follow-up to WFIRST, multiplexing its scientific return by obtaining deep 1 to 4 micron slit spectroscopy for ~90% of all galaxies imaged by the ~2200 sq deg WFIRST High Latitude Survey at z > 0.5. ATLAS spectroscopy will measure accurate and precise redshifts for ~300M galaxies out to z < 7, and deliver spectra that enable a wide range of diagnostic studies of the physical properties of galaxies over most of cosmic history. ATLAS and WFIRST together will produce a 3D map of the Universe with ~Mpc resolution in redshift space. ATLAS will: (1) Revolutionize galaxy evolution studies by tracing the relation between galaxies and dark matter from galaxy groups to cosmic voids and filaments, from the epoch of reionization through the peak era of galaxy assembly; (2) Open a new window into the dark Universe by weighing the dark matter filaments using 3D weak lensing with spectroscopic redshifts, and obtaining definitive measurements of dark energy and modification of General Relativity using galaxy clustering; (3) Probe the Milky Way's dust-enshrouded regions, reaching the far side of our Galaxy; and (4) Explore the formation history of the outer Solar System by characterizing Kuiper Belt Objects. ATLAS is a 1.5m telescope with a field of view (FoV) of 0.4 sq deg, and uses Digital Micro-mirror Devices (DMDs) as slit selectors. It has a spectroscopic resolution of R = 600, a wavelength range of 1-4 microns, and a spectroscopic multiplex factor ~5,000-10,000. ATLAS is designed to fit within the NASA probe-class mission cost envelope; it has a single instrument, a telescope aperture that allows for a lighter launch vehicle, and mature technology (DMDs can reach TRL 6 within 2 years). ATLAS will lead to transformative science over the entire range of astrophysics.
  • The Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS) is a deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFC3/IR (Wide Field Camera 3 Infrared) slitless spectroscopic survey of four deep fields. Two fields are located in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-North (GOODS-N) area and two fields are located in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South (GOODS-S) area. One of the southern fields selected is the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. Each of these four fields were observed using the WFC3/G102 grism (0.8$\mu m$-1.15$\mu m$ continuous coverage) with a total exposure time of 40 orbits (~ 100 kilo-seconds) per field. This reaches a 3 sigma continuum depth of ~26 AB magnitudes and probes emission lines to $\approx 10^{-17}\ erg\ s^{-1} \ cm^{-2}$. This paper details the four FIGS fields and the overall observational strategy of the project. A detailed description of the Simulation Based Extraction (SBE) method used to extract and combine over 10000 spectra of over 2000 distinct sources brighter than m_F105W=26.5 mag is provided. High fidelity simulations of the observations is shown to significantly improve the background subtraction process, the spectral contamination estimates, and the final flux calibration. This allows for the combination of multiple spectra to produce a final high quality, deep, 1D-spectra for each object in the survey.
  • Although extensively investigated, the role of the environment in galaxy formation is still not well understood. In this context, the Galaxy Stellar Mass Function (GSMF) is a powerful tool to understand how environment relates to galaxy mass assembly and the quenching of star-formation. In this work, we make use of the high-precision photometric redshifts of the UltraVISTA Survey to study the GSMF in different environments up to $z \sim 3$, on physical scales from 0.3 to 2 Mpc, down to masses of $M \sim 10^{10} M_{\odot}$. We witness the appearance of environmental signatures for both quiescent and star-forming galaxies. We find that the shape of the GSMF of quiescent galaxies is different in high- and low-density environments up to $z \sim 2$ with the high-mass end ($M \gtrsim 10^{11} M_{\odot}$) being enhanced in high-density environments. On the contrary, for star-forming galaxies a difference between the GSMF in high- and low density environments is present for masses $M \lesssim 10^{11} M_{\odot}$. Star-forming galaxies in this mass range appear to be more frequent in low-density environments up to $z < 1.5$. Differences in the shape of the GSMF are not visible anymore at $z > 2$. Our results, in terms of general trends in the shape of the GSMF, are in agreement with a scenario in which galaxies are quenched when they enter hot gas-dominated massive haloes which are preferentially in high-density environments.
  • We propose a new methodology aimed at finding star-forming galaxies in the phase which immediately follows the star-formation (SF) quenching, based on the use of high- to low-ionization emission line ratios. These ratios rapidly disappear after the SF halt, due to the softening of the UV ionizing radiation. We focus on [O III] $\lambda$5007/H$\alpha$ and [Ne III] $\lambda$3869/[O II] $\lambda$3727, studying them with simulations obtained with the CLOUDY photoionization code. If a sharp quenching is assumed, we find that the two ratios are very sensitive tracers as they drop by a factor $\sim$ 10 within $\sim$ 10 Myr from the interruption of the SF; instead, if a smoother and slower SF decline is assumed (i.e. an exponentially declining star-formation history with $e$-folding time $\tau=$ 200 Myr), they decrease by a factor $\sim$ 2 within $\sim$ 80 Myr. We mitigate the ionization -- metallicity degeneracy affecting our methodology using pairs of emission line ratios separately related to metallicity and ionization, adopting the [N II] $\lambda$6584/[O II] $\lambda$3727 ratio as metallicity diagnostic. Using a Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxy sample, we identify 10 examples among the most extreme quenching candidates within the [O III] $\lambda$5007/H$\alpha$ vs. [N II] $\lambda$6584/[O II] $\lambda$3727 plane, characterized by low [O III] $\lambda$5007/H$\alpha$, faint [Ne III] $\lambda$3869, and by blue dust-corrected spectra and $(u-r)$ colours, as expected if the SF quenching has occurred in the very recent past. Our results also suggest that the observed fractions of quenching candidates can be used to constrain the quenching mechanism at work and its time-scales.
  • Redshift-space clustering anisotropies caused by cosmic peculiar velocities provide a powerful probe to test the gravity theory on large scales. However, to extract unbiased physical constraints, the clustering pattern has to be modelled accurately, taking into account the effects of non-linear dynamics at small scales, and properly describing the link between the selected cosmic tracers and the underlying dark matter field. We use a large hydrodynamic simulation to investigate how the systematic error on the linear growth rate, $f$, caused by model uncertainties, depends on sample selections and comoving scales. Specifically, we measure the redshift-space two-point correlation function of mock samples of galaxies, galaxy clusters and Active Galactic Nuclei, extracted from the Magneticum simulation, in the redshift range 0.2 < z < 2, and adopting different sample selections. We estimate $f\sigma_8$ by modelling both the monopole and the full two-dimensional anisotropic clustering, using the dispersion model. We find that the systematic error on $f\sigma_8$ depends significantly on the range of scales considered for the fit. If the latter is kept fixed, the error depends on both redshift and sample selection, due to the scale-dependent impact of non-linearities, if not properly modelled. On the other hand, we show that it is possible to get unbiased constraints on $f\sigma_8$ provided that the analysis is restricted to a proper range of scales, that depends non trivially on the properties of the sample. This can have a strong impact on multiple tracers analyses, and when combining catalogues selected at different redshifts.
  • We present a sample of 34 spectroscopically confirmed BzK-selected ~1e11 Msun quiescent galaxies (pBzK) in the COSMOS field. The targets were initially observed with VIMOS on the VLT to facilitate the calibration of the photometric redshifts of massive galaxies at z >~ 1.5. Here we describe the reduction and analysis of the data, and the spectrophotometric properties of these pBzK galaxies. In particular, using a spatially resolved median 2D spectrum, we find that the fraction of stellar populations with ages <1 Gyr is at least 3 times higher in the outer regions of the pBzK galaxies than in their cores. This results in a mild age gradient of ~<0.4 Gyr over ~6 kpc and suggests either the occurrence of widespread rejuvenation episodes or that inside-out quenching played a role in the passivization of this galaxy population. We also report on low-level star formation rates derived from the [OII]3727A emission line, with SFR_OII = 3.7-4.5 Msun/yr. This estimate is confirmed by an independent measurement on a separate sample of similarly-selected quiescent galaxies in the COSMOS field, using stacked far-infrared data (SFR_FIR = 2-4 Msun/yr). This second, photometric sample also displays significant excess at 1.4 GHz, suggestive of the presence of radio-mode AGN activity.
  • Deriving the expansion history of the Universe is a major goal of modern cosmology. To date, the most accurate measurements have been obtained with Type Ia Supernovae and Baryon Acoustic Oscillations, providing evidence for the existence of a transition epoch at which the expansion rate changes from decelerated to accelerated. However, these results have been obtained within the framework of specific cosmological models that must be implicitly or explicitly assumed in the measurement. It is therefore crucial to obtain measurements of the accelerated expansion of the Universe independently of assumptions on cosmological models. Here we exploit the unprecedented statistics provided by the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) Data Release 9 to provide new constraints on the Hubble parameter $H(z)$ using the em cosmic chronometers approach. We extract a sample of more than 130000 of the most massive and passively evolving galaxies, obtaining five new cosmology-independent $H(z)$ measurements in the redshift range $0.3<z<0.5$, with an accuracy of $\sim$11-16\% incorporating both statistical and systematic errors. Once combined, these measurements yield a 6\% accuracy constraint of $H(z=0.4293)=91.8\pm5.3$ km/s/Mpc. The new data are crucial to provide the first cosmology-independent determination of the transition redshift at high statistical significance, measuring $z_{t}=0.4\pm0.1$, and to significantly disfavor the null hypothesis of no transition between decelerated and accelerated expansion at 99.9\% confidence level. This analysis highlights the wide potential of the cosmic chronometers approach: it permits to derive constraints on the expansion history of the Universe with results competitive with standard probes, and most importantly, being the estimates independent of the cosmological model, it can constrain cosmologies beyond -and including- the $\Lambda$CDM model.
  • Massive galaxies are key probes to understand how the baryonic matter evolves within the dark matter halos. We use the "archaeological" approach to infer the stellar population properties and star formation histories of the most massive (M > 10^10.75 Msun) and passive early-type galaxies (ETGs) at 0 < z < 0.3, based on stacked, high signal to noise ratio (SNR), Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra. We exploit the information present in the full-spectrum by means of the STARLIGHT public code to retrieve the ETGs evolutionary properties, such as age, metallicity and star formation history. We find that the stellar metallicities are slightly supersolar (Z ~ 0.027 +/- 0.002) and do not depend on redshift. Dust extinction is very low, with a mean of Av ~ 0.08 +/- 0.03 mag. The ETGs show an anti-hierarchical evolution (downsizing) where more massive galaxies are older. The SFHs can be approximated by a parametric function of the form SFR(t) \propto \tau^-(c+1) t^(c) exp(-t/\tau), with typical short e-folding times of \tau ~ 0.6 - 0.8 Gyr (and a dispersion of +/- 0.1 Gyr) and c ~ 0.1 (and a dispersion of +/- 0.05). The inferred SFHs are also used to place constraints on the properties and evolution of the ETG progenitors. In particular, the ETGs of our samples should have formed most stars through a phase of vigorous star formation (SFRs > 350-400 Msun yr^-1) at z ~ 4 - 5, and are quiescent by z ~ 1.5 -2. Our results represent an attempt to demonstrate quantitatively the evolutionary link between the most massive ETGs at z < 0.3 and the properties of suitable progenitors at high redshifts, also showing that the full-spectrum fitting is a powerful approach to reconstruct the star formation histories of massive quiescent galaxies.
  • We use the latest compilation of observational H(z) measurements obtained with cosmic chronometers in the redshift range $0<z<2$ to place constraints on cosmological parameters. We consider the sample alone and in combination with other state-of-the art cosmological probes: CMB data from the latest Planck 2015 release, the most recent estimate of the Hubble constant $H_{0}$, a compilation of recent BAO data, and the latest SNe sample. Since cosmic chronometers are independent of the assumed cosmological model, we are able to provide constraints on the parameters that govern the expansion history of the Universe in a way that can be used to test cosmological models. We show that the H(z) measurements obtained with cosmic chronometer from the BOSS survey provide enough constraining power in combination with CMB data to constrain the time evolution of dark energy, yielding constraints competitive with those obtained using SNe and/or BAO. From late-Universe probes alone we find that $w_0=-0.9\pm0.18$ and $w_a=-0.5\pm1.7$, and when combining also CMB data we obtain $w_0=-0.98\pm0.11$and $w_a=-0.30\pm0.4$. These new constraints imply that nearly all quintessence models are disfavoured, only phantom models or a pure cosmological constant being allowed. For the curvature we find $\Omega_k=0.003\pm0.003$, including CMB data. Cosmic chronometers data are important also to constrain neutrino properties by breaking or reducing degeneracies with other parameters. We find that $N_{eff}=3.17\pm0.15$, thus excluding the possibility of an extra (sterile) neutrino at more than $5\sigma$, and put competitive limits on the sum of neutrino masses, $\Sigma m_{\nu}< 0.27$ eV at 95% confidence level. Finally, we constrain the redshift evolution of dark energy, and find w(z) consistent with the $\Lambda$CDM model at the 40% level over the entire redshift range $0<z<2$. [abridged]
  • We provide constraints on the accuracy with which the neutrino mass fraction, $f_{\nu}$, can be estimated when exploiting measurements of redshift-space distortions, describing in particular how the error on neutrino mass depends on three fundamental parameters of a characteristic galaxy redshift survey: density, halo bias and volume. In doing this, we make use of a series of dark matter halo catalogues extracted from the BASICC simulation. The mock data are analysed via a Markov Chain Monte Carlo likelihood analysis. We find a fitting function that well describes the dependence of the error on bias, density and volume, showing a decrease in the error as the bias and volume increase, and a decrease with density down to an almost constant value for high density values. This fitting formula allows us to produce forecasts on the precision achievable with future surveys on measurements of the neutrino mass fraction. For example, a Euclid-like spectroscopic survey should be able to measure the neutrino mass fraction with an accuracy of $\delta f_{\nu} \approx 6.7\times10^{-4}$, using redshift-space clustering once all the other cosmological parameters are kept fixed to the $\Lambda$CDM case.
  • We analyse the largest spectroscopic samples of galaxy clusters to date, and provide observational constraints on the distance-redshift relation from baryon acoustic oscillations. The cluster samples considered in this work have been extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey at three median redshifts, $z=0.2$, $z=0.3$, and $z=0.5$. The number of objects is $12910$, $42215$, and $11816$, respectively. We detect the peak of baryon acoustic oscillations for all the three samples. The derived distance constraints are: $r_s/D_V(z=0.2)=0.18 \pm 0.01$, $r_s/D_V(z=0.3)=0.124 \pm 0.004$ and $r_s/D_V(z=0.5)=0.080 \pm 0.002$. Combining these measurements, we obtain robust constraints on cosmological parameters. Our results are in agreement with the standard $\Lambda$ cold dark matter model. Specifically, we constrain the Hubble constant in a $\Lambda$CDM model, $H_0 = 64_{-9}^{+14} \, \mathrm{km} \, \mathrm{s}^{-1}\mathrm{Mpc}^{-1}$, the density of curvature energy, in the $o\Lambda$CDM context, $\Omega_K = -0.015_{-0.36}^{+0.34}$, and finally the parameter of the dark energy equation of state in the $ow$CDM case, $w = -1.01_{-0.44}^{+0.44}$. This is the first time the distance-redshift relation has been constrained using only the peak of baryon acoustic oscillations of galaxy clusters.
  • Measuring environment for large numbers of distant galaxies is still an open problem, for which we need galaxy positions and redshifts. Photometric redshifts are more easily available for large numbers of galaxies, but at the price of larger uncertainties than spectroscopic ones. In this work we study how photometric redshifts affect the measurement of galaxy environment and how this may limit an analysis of the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF) in different environments. Using mock galaxy catalogues, we measured the environment with a fixed aperture method, using each galaxy's true and photometric redshifts. We varied the fixed aperture volume parameters and the photometric redshift uncertainties. We then computed GSMF as a function of redshift and environment. We found that only when using high-precision photometric redshifts with $\sigma_{\Delta z/(1+z)} \le 0.01$, the most extreme environments can be reconstructed in a fairly accurate way, with a fraction $\ge 60\div 80\%$ of galaxies placed in the correct density quartile and a contamination of $\le 10\%$ by opposite quartile interlopers. A volume height comparable to the $\pm 1.5\sigma$ error of photometric redshifts grants a better reconstruction than other volume configurations. When using such an environmental measure, we found that any differences between the starting GSMF (divided accordingly to the true galaxy environment) will be damped on average of $\sim 0.3$ dex when using photometric redshifts, but will be still resolvable. These results may be used to interpret real data as we obtained them in a way that is fairly independent from how well the mock catalogues reproduce the real galaxy distribution. This work represents a preparatory study for future wide area photometric redshift surveys such as the Euclid Survey and we plan to apply these results to an analysis of the GSMF in the UltraVISTA Survey in future work.
  • We present the first estimate of age, stellar metallicity and chemical abundance ratios, for an individual early-type galaxy at high-redshift (z = 1.426) in the COSMOS field. Our analysis is based on observations obtained with the X-Shooter instrument at the VLT, which cover the visual and near infrared spectrum at high (R >5000) spectral resolution. We measure the values of several spectral absorptions tracing chemical species, in particular Magnesium and Iron, besides determining the age-sensitive D4000 break. We compare the measured indices to stellar population models, finding good agreement. We find that our target is an old (t > 3 Gyr), high-metallicity ([Z/H] > 0.5) galaxy which formed its stars at z_{form} > 5 within a short time scale ~0.1 Gyr, as testified by the strong [\alpha/Fe] ratio ( > 0.4), and has passively evolved in the first > 3-4 Gyr of its life. We have verified that this result is robust against the choice and number of fitted spectral features, and stellar population model. The result of an old age and high-metallicity has important implications for galaxy formation and evolution confirming an early and rapid formation of the most massive galaxies in the Universe.
  • The joint analysis of clustering and stacked gravitational lensing of galaxy clusters in large surveys can constrain the formation and evolution of structures and the cosmological parameters. On scales outside a few virial radii, the halo bias, $b$, is linear and the lensing signal is dominated by the correlated distribution of matter around galaxy clusters. We discuss a method to measure the power spectrum amplitude $\sigma_8$ and $b$ based on a minimal modelling. We considered a sample of $\sim 120000$ clusters photometrically selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey in the redshift range $0.1<z<0.6$. The auto-correlation was studied through the two-point function of a subsample of $\sim 70000$ clusters; the matter-halo correlation was derived from the weak lensing signal of the subsample of $\sim 1200$ clusters with Canada-France-Hawaii Lensing Survey data. We obtained a direct measurement of $b$, which increases with mass in agreement with predictions of the $\Lambda$CDM paradigm. Assuming $\Omega_\mathrm{M}=0.3$, we found $\sigma_8=0.78\pm0.16$. We used the same clusters for measuring both lensing and clustering and the estimate of $\sigma_8$ did require neither the mass-richness relation, nor the knowledge of the selection function, nor the modelling of $b$. With an additional theoretical prior on the bias, we obtained $\sigma_8=0.75\pm0.08$.
  • Cosmic voids are effective cosmological probes to discriminate among competing world models. Their identification is generally based on density or geometry criteria that, because of their very nature, are prone to shot noise. We propose two void finders that are based on dynamical criterion to select voids in Lagrangian coordinates and minimise the impact of sparse sampling. The first approach exploits the Zel'dovich approximation to trace back in time the orbits of galaxies located in voids and their surroundings, the second uses the observed galaxy-galaxy correlation function to relax the objects' spatial distribution to homogeneity and isotropy. In both cases voids are defined as regions of the negative velocity divergence, that can be regarded as sinks of the back-in-time streamlines of the mass tracers. To assess the performance of our methods we used a dark matter halo mock catalogue CoDECS, and compared the results with those obtained with the ZOBOV void finder. We find that the void divergence profiles are less scattered than the density ones and, therefore, their stacking constitutes a more accurate cosmological probe. The significance of the divergence signal in the central part of voids obtained from both our finders is 60% higher than for overdensity profiles in the ZOBOV case. The ellipticity of the stacked void measured in the divergence field is closer to unity, as expected, than what is found when using halo positions. Therefore our void finders are complementary to the existing methods, that should contribute to improve the accuracy of void-based cosmological tests.
  • We investigate the possibility of constraining coupled dark energy (cDE) cosmologies using the three-point correlation function (3PCF). Making use of the CoDECS N-body simulations, we study the statistical properties of cold dark matter (CDM) haloes for a variety of models, including a fiducial $\Lambda$CDM scenario and five models in which dark energy (DE) and CDM mutually interact. We measure both the halo 3PCF, $\zeta(\theta)$, and the reduced 3PCF, $Q(\theta)$, at different scales ($2<r\,[$Mpc\h$]<40$) and redshifts ($0\leq z\leq2$). In all cDE models considered in this work, $Q(\theta)$ appears flat at small scales (for all redshifts) and at low redshifts (for all scales), while it builds up the characteristic V-shape anisotropy at increasing redshifts and scales. With respect to the $\Lambda $CDM predictions, cDE models show lower (higher) values of the halo 3PCF for perpendicular (elongated) configurations. The effect is also scale-dependent, with differences between $\Lambda$CDM and cDE models that increase at large scales. We made use of these measurements to estimate the halo bias, that results in fair agreement with the one computed from the two-point correlation function (2PCF). The main advantage of using both the 2PCF and 3PCF is to break the bias$-\sigma_{8}$ degeneracy. Moreover, we find that our bias estimates are approximately independent of the assumed strength of DE coupling. This study demonstrates the power of a higher-order clustering analysis in discriminating between alternative cosmological scenarios, for both present and forthcoming galaxy surveys, such as e.g. BOSS and Euclid.
  • We present deep Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 slitless spectroscopic observations of the distant cluster Cl J1449+0856. These cover a single pointing with 18 orbits of G141 spectroscopy and F140W imaging, allowing us to derive secure redshifts down to m_140~25.5 AB and 3sigma line fluxes of 5*10^(-18) erg/s/cm^2. In particular, we were able to spectroscopically confirm 12 early-type galaxies in the field up to z~3, 6 of which in the cluster core, which represents the first direct spectroscopic confirmation of passive galaxies in a z=2 cluster environment. With 140 redshifts in a ~6 arcmin^2 field, we can trace the spatial and redshift galaxy distribution in the cluster core and background field. We find two strong peaks at z=2.00 and z=2.07, where only one was seen in our previously published ground-based data. Thanks to the spectroscopic confirmation of the cluster ETGs, we can now re-evaluate the redshift of Cl J1449+0856 at z=2.00, rather than z=2.07, with the background overdensity being revealed to be sparse and "sheet"-like. This presents an interesting case of chance alignment of two close yet unrelated structures, each one preferentially selected by different observing strategies. With 6 quiescent or early-type spectroscopic members and 20 star-forming ones, Cl J1449+0856 is now reliably confirmed to be at z=2.00. The identified members can now allow for a detailed study of galaxy properties in the densest environment at z=2.
  • In the local Universe, galaxy properties show a strong dependence on environment. In cluster cores, early type galaxies dominate, whereas star-forming galaxies are more and more common in the outskirts. At higher redshifts and in somewhat less dense environments (e.g. galaxy groups), the situation is less clear. One open issue is that of whether and how the star formation rate (SFR) of galaxies in groups depends on the distance from the centre of mass. To shed light on this topic, we have built a sample of X-ray selected galaxy groups at 0<z<1.6 in various blank fields (ECDFS, COSMOS, GOODS). We use a sample of spectroscopically confirmed group members with stellar mass M >10^10.3 M_sun in order to have a high spectroscopic completeness. As we use only spectroscopic redshifts, our results are not affected by uncertainties due to projection effects. We use several SFR indicators to link the star formation (SF) activity to the galaxy environment. Taking advantage of the extremely deep mid-infrared Spitzer MIPS and far-infrared Herschel PACS observations, we have an accurate, broad-band measure of the SFR for the bulk of the star-forming galaxies. We use multi-wavelength SED fitting techniques to estimate the stellar masses of all objects and the SFR of the MIPS and PACS undetected galaxies. We analyse the dependence of the SF activity, stellar mass and specific SFR on the group-centric distance, up to z~1.6, for the first time. We do not find any correlation between the mean SFR and group-centric distance at any redshift. We do not observe any strong mass segregation either, in agreement with predictions from simulations. Our results suggest that either groups have a much smaller spread in accretion times with respect to the clusters and that the relaxation time is longer than the group crossing time.
  • We have assembled a compilation of observational Hubble parameter measurements estimated with the differential evolution of cosmic chronometers, in the redshift range 0<z<1.75. This sample has been used, in combination with CMB data and with the most recent estimate of the Hubble constant H_0, to derive new constraints on several cosmological parameters. The new Hubble parameter data are very useful to break some of the parameter degeneracies present in CMB-only analysis, and to constrain possible deviations from the standard (minimal) flat \Lambda CDM model. The H(z) data are especially valuable in constraining \Omega_k and \Omega_DE in models that allow a variation of those parameters, yielding constraints that are competitive with those obtained using Supernovae and/or baryon acoustic oscillations. We also find that our H(z) data are important to constrain parameters that do no affect directly the expansion history, by breaking or reducing degeneracies with other parameters. We find that Nrel=3.45\pm0.33 using WMAP 7-years data in combination with South Pole Telescope data and our H(z) determinations (Nrel=3.71\pm0.45 using Atacama Cosmology Telescope data instead of South Pole Telescope). We exclude Nrel>4 at 95% CL (74% CL) using the same datasets combinations. We also put competitive limits on the sum of neutrino masses, \Sigma m_\nu<0.24 eV at 68% confidence level. These results have been proven to be extremely robust to many possible systematic effects, such as the initial choice of stellar population synthesis model adopted to estimate H(z) and the progenitor-bias.
  • The clustering of galaxies observed in future redshift surveys will provide a wealth of cosmological information. Matching the signal at different redshifts constrains the dark energy driving the acceleration of the expansion of the Universe. In tandem with these geometrical constraints, redshift-space distortions (RSD) depend on the build up of large-scale structure. As pointed out by many authors measurements of these effects are intrinsically coupled. We investigate this link, and argue that it strongly depends on the cosmological assumptions adopted when analysing data. Using representative assumptions for the parameters of the Euclid survey in order to provide a baseline future experiment, we show how the derived constraints change due to different model assumptions. We argue that even the assumption of a Friedman-Robertson-Walker (FRW) space-time is sufficient to reduce the importance of the coupling to a significant degree. Taking this idea further, we consider how the data would actually be analysed and argue that we should not expect to be able to simultaneously constrain multiple deviations from the standard $\Lambda$CDM model. We therefore consider different possible ways in which the Universe could deviate from the $\Lambda$CDM model, and show how the coupling between geometrical constraints and structure growth affects the measurement of such deviations.
  • The baryonic acoustic peak in the correlation function of galaxies and galaxy clusters provides a standard ruler to probe the space-time geometry of the Universe, jointly constraining the angular diameter distance and the Hubble expansion rate. Moreover, non-linear effects can systematically shift the peak position, giving us the opportunity to exploit this clustering feature also as a dynamical probe. We investigate the possibility of detecting interactions in the dark sector through an accurate determination of the baryonic acoustic scale. Making use of the public halo catalogues extracted from the CoDECS simulations -- the largest suite of N-body simulations of interacting dark energy models to date -- we determine the position of the baryonic scale fitting a band-filtered correlation function, specifically designed to amplify the signal at the sound horizon. We analyze the shifts due to non-linear dynamics, redshift-space distortions and Gaussian redshift errors, in the range 0 < z < 2. Since the coupling between dark energy and dark matter affects in a particular way the clustering properties of haloes and, specifically, the amplitude and location of the baryonic acoustic oscillations, the cosmic evolution of the baryonic peak position might provide a direct way to discriminate interacting dark energy models from the standard \Lambda CDM framework. To maximize the efficiency of the baryonic peak as a dynamic probe, the correlation function has to be measured in redshift-space, where the baryonic acoustic shift due to non-linearities is amplified. The typical redshift errors of spectroscopic galaxy surveys do not significantly impact these results.