• Rapid experimental advances now enable simultaneous electrophysiological recording of neural activity at single-cell resolution across large regions of the nervous system. Models of this neural network activity will necessarily increase in size and complexity, thus increasing the computational cost of simulating them and the challenge of analyzing them. Here we present a novel method to approximate the activity and firing statistics of a general firing rate network model (of Wilson-Cowan type) subject to noisy correlated background inputs. The method requires solving a system of transcendental equations and is fast compared to Monte Carlo simulations of coupled stochastic differential equations. We implement the method with several examples of coupled neural networks and show that the results are quantitatively accurate even with moderate coupling strengths and an appreciable amount of heterogeneity in many parameters. This work should be useful for investigating how various neural attributes qualitatively effect the spiking statistics of coupled neural networks. Matlab code implementing the method is freely available at GitHub (\url{http://github.com/chengly70/FiringRateModReduction}).
  • We consider the problem of finding the spectrum of an operator taking the form of a low-rank (rank one or two) non-normal perturbation of a well-understood operator, motivated by a number of problems of applied interest which take this form. We use the fact that the system is a low rank perturbation of a solved problem, together with a simple idea of classical differential geometry (the envelope of a family of curves) to completely analyze the spectrum. We use these techniques to analyze three problems of this form: a model of the oculomotor integrator due to Anastasio and Gad (2007), a continuum integrator model, and a nonlocal model of phase separation due to Rubinstein and Sternberg (1992).
  • Determining how synaptic coupling within and between regions is modulated during sensory processing is an important topic in neuroscience. Electrophysiological recordings provide detailed information about neural spiking but have traditionally been confined to a particular region or layer of cortex. Here we develop new theoretical methods to study interactions between and within two brain regions, based on experimental measurements of spiking activity simultaneously recorded from the two regions. By systematically comparing experimentally-obtained spiking statistics to (efficiently computed) model spike rate statistics, we identify regions in model parameter space that are consistent with the experimental data. We apply our new technique to dual micro-electrode array in vivo recordings from two distinct regions: olfactory bulb (OB) and anterior piriform cortex (PC). Our analysis predicts that: i) inhibition within the afferent region (OB) has to be weaker than the inhibition within PC, ii) excitation from PC to OB is generally stronger than excitation from OB to PC, iii) excitation from PC to OB and inhibition within PC have to both be relatively strong compared to presynaptic inputs from OB. These predictions are validated in a spiking neural network model of the OB--PC pathway that satisfies the many constraints from our experimental data. We find when the derived relationships are violated, the spiking statistics no longer satisfy the constraints from the data. In principle this modeling framework can be adapted to other systems and be used to investigate relationships between other neural attributes besides network connection strengths. Thus, this work can serve as a guide to further investigations into the relationships of various neural attributes within and across different regions during sensory processing.
  • A central question in neuroscience is to understand how noisy firing patterns are used to transmit information. Because neural spiking is noisy, spiking patterns are often quantified via pairwise correlations, or the probability that two cells will spike coincidentally, above and beyond their baseline firing rate. One observation frequently made in experiments, is that correlations can increase systematically with firing rate. Theoretical studies have determined that stimulus-dependent correlations that increase with firing rate can have beneficial effects on information coding; however, we still have an incomplete understanding of what circuit mechanisms do, or do not, produce this correlation-firing rate relationship. Here, we study the relationship between pairwise correlations and firing rates in recurrently coupled excitatory-inhibitory spiking networks with conductance-based synapses. We found that with stronger excitatory coupling, a positive relationship emerges between pairwise correlations and firing rates. To explain these findings, we used linear response theory to predict the full correlation matrix and to decompose correlations in terms of graph motifs. We then used this decomposition to explain why covariation of correlations with firing rate -- a relationship previously explained in feedforward networks driven by correlated input -- emerges in some recurrent networks but not in others. Furthermore, when correlations covary with firing rate, this relationship is reflected in low-rank structure in the correlation matrix.
  • We examine a family of random firing-rate neural networks in which we enforce the neurobiological constraint of Dale's Law --- each neuron makes either excitatory or inhibitory connections onto its post-synaptic targets. We find that this constrained system may be described as a perturbation from a system with non-trivial symmetries. We analyze the symmetric system using the tools of equivariant bifurcation theory, and demonstrate that the symmetry-implied structures remain evident in the perturbed system. In comparison, spectral characteristics of the network coupling matrix are relatively uninformative about the behavior of the constrained system.
  • Describing the collective activity of neural populations is a daunting task: the number of possible patterns grows exponentially with the number of cells, resulting in practically unlimited complexity. Recent empirical studies, however, suggest a vast simplification in how multi-neuron spiking occurs: the activity patterns of some circuits are nearly completely captured by pairwise interactions among neurons. Why are such pairwise models so successful in some instances, but insufficient in others? Here, we study the emergence of higher-order interactions in simple circuits with different architectures and inputs. We quantify the impact of higher-order interactions by comparing the responses of mechanistic circuit models vs. "null" descriptions in which all higher-than-pairwise correlations have been accounted for by lower order statistics, known as pairwise maximum entropy models. We find that bimodal input signals produce larger deviations from pairwise predictions than unimodal inputs for circuits with local and global connectivity. Moreover, recurrent coupling can accentuate these deviations, if coupling strengths are neither too weak nor too strong. A circuit model based on intracellular recordings from ON parasol retinal ganglion cells shows that a broad range of light signals induce unimodal inputs to spike generators, and that coupling strengths produce weak effects on higher-order interactions. This provides a novel explanation for the success of pairwise models in this system. Overall, our findings identify circuit-level mechanisms that produce and fail to produce higher-order spiking statistics in neural ensembles.
  • A key step in many perceptual decision tasks is the integration of sensory inputs over time, but fundamental questions remain about how this is accomplished in neural circuits. One possibility is to balance decay modes of membranes and synapses with recurrent excitation. To allow integration over long timescales, however, this balance must be precise; this is known as the fine tuning problem. The need for fine tuning can be overcome via a ratchet-like mechanism, in which momentary inputs must be above a preset limit to be registered by the circuit. The degree of this ratcheting embodies a tradeoff between sensitivity to the input stream and robustness against parameter mistuning. The goal of our study is to analyze the consequences of this tradeoff for decision making performance. For concreteness, we focus on the well-studied random dot motion discrimination task. For stimulus parameters constrained by experimental data, we find that loss of sensitivity to inputs has surprisingly little cost for decision performance. This leads robust integrators to performance gains when feedback becomes mistuned. Moreover, we find that substantially robust and mistuned integrator models remain consistent with chronometric and accuracy functions found in experiments. We explain our findings via sequential analysis of the momentary and integrated signals, and discuss their implication: robust integrators may be surprisingly well-suited to subserve the basic function of evidence integration in many cognitive tasks.
  • The mechanisms and impact of correlated, or synchronous, firing among pairs and groups of neurons is under intense investigation throughout the nervous system. A ubiquitous circuit feature that can give rise to such correlations consists of overlapping, or common, inputs to pairs and populations of cells, leading to common spike train responses. Here, we use computational tools to study how the transfer of common input currents into common spike outputs is modulated by the physiology of the recipient cells. We focus on a key conductance - gA, for the A-type potassium current - which drives neurons between "Type II" excitability (low gA), and "Type I" excitability (high gA). Regardless of gA, cells transform common input fluctuations into a ten- dency to spike nearly simultaneously. However, this process is more pronounced at low gA values, as previously predicted by reduced "phase" models. Thus, for a given level of common input, Type II neurons produce spikes that are relatively more correlated over short time scales. Over long time scales, the trend reverses, with Type II neurons producing relatively less correlated spike trains. This is because these cells' increased tendency for simultaneous spiking is balanced by opposing tendencies at larger time lags. We demonstrate a novel implication for neural signal processing: downstream cells with long time constants are selectively driven by Type I cell populations upstream, and those with short time constants by Type II cell populations. Our results are established via high-throughput numerical simulations, and explained via the cells' filtering properties and nonlinear dynamics.
  • We examine the effect of the phase-resetting curve (PRC) on the transfer of correlated input signals into correlated output spikes in a class of neural models receiving noisy, super-threshold stimulation. We use linear response theory to approximate the spike correlation coefficient in terms of moments of the associated exit time problem, and contrast the results for Type I vs. Type II models and across the different timescales over which spike correlations can be assessed. We find that, on long timescales, Type I oscillators transfer correlations much more efficiently than Type II oscillators. On short timescales this trend reverses, with the relative efficiency switching at a timescale that depends on the mean and standard deviation of input currents. This switch occurs over timescales that could be exploited by downstream circuits.