• Rigorous nonequilibrium actions for the many-body problem are usually derived by means of path integrals combined with a discrete temporal mesh on the Schwinger-Keldysh time contour. The latter suffers from a fundamental limitation: the initial state on this contour cannot be arbitrary, but necessarily needs to be described by a non-interacting density matrix, while interactions are switched on adiabatically. The Kostantinov-Perel' contour overcomes these and other limitations, allowing generic initial-state preparations. In this Article, we apply the technique of the discrete temporal mesh to rigorously build the nonequilibrium path integral on the Kostantinov-Perel' time contour.
  • We study the dynamical magnetic susceptibility of a strongly correlated electronic system in the presence of a time-dependent hopping field, deriving a generalized Bethe-Salpeter equation which is valid also out of equilibrium. Focusing on the single-orbital Hubbard model within the time-dependent Hartree-Fock approximation, we solve the equation in the non-equilibrium adiabatic regime, obtaining a closed expression for the transverse magnetic susceptibility. From this, we provide a rigorous definition of non-equilibrium (time-dependent) magnon frequencies and exchange parameters, expressed in terms of non-equilibrium single-electron Green functions and self-energies. In the particular case of equilibrium, we recover previously known results.
  • We derive a set of equations expressing the parameters of the magnetic interactions characterizing a strongly correlated electronic system in terms of single-electron Green's functions and self-energies. This allows to establish a mapping between the initial electronic system and a spin model including up to quadratic interactions between the effective spins, with a general interaction (exchange) tensor that accounts for anisotropic exchange, Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and other symmetric terms such as dipole-dipole interaction. We present the formulas in a format that can be used for computations via Dynamical Mean Field Theory algorithms.
  • We present a technique to map an electronic model with local interactions (a generalized multi-orbital Hubbard model) onto an effective model of interacting classical spins, by requiring that the thermodynamic potentials associated to spin rotations in the two systems are equivalent up to second order in the rotation angles. This allows to determine the parameters of relativistic and non-relativistic magnetic interactions in the effective spin model in terms of equilibrium Green's functions of the electronic model. The Hamiltonian of the electronic system includes, in addition to the non-relativistic part, relativistic single-particle terms such as the Zeeman coupling to an external magnetic fields, spin-orbit coupling, and arbitrary magnetic anisotropies; the orbital degrees of freedom of the electrons are explicitly taken into account. We determine the complete relativistic exchange tensors, accounting for anisotropic exchange, Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions, as well as additional non-diagonal symmetric terms (which may include dipole-dipole interaction). Our procedure provides the complete exchange tensors in a unified framework, including previously disregarded features such as the vertices of two-particle Green's functions and non-local self-energies. We do not assume any smallness in spin-orbit coupling, so our treatment is in this sense exact. Finally, we show how to distinguish and address separately the spin, orbital and spin-orbital contributions to magnetism.
  • We develop a theory of inter-valley Coulomb scattering in semiconducting carbon-nanotube quantum dots, taking into account the effects of curvature and chirality. Starting from the effective-mass description of single-particle states, we study the two-electron system by fully including Coulomb interaction, spin-orbit coupling, and short-range disorder. We find that the energy level splittings associated with inter-valley scattering are nearly independent of the chiral angle and, while smaller than those due to spin-orbit interaction, large enough to be measurable.
  • We formulate a low-energy theory for the magnetic interactions between electrons in the multi-band Hubbard model under non-equilibrium conditions determined by an external time-dependent electric field which simulates laser-induced spin dynamics. We derive expressions for dynamical exchange parameters in terms of non-equilibrium electronic Green functions and self-energies, which can be computed, e.g., with the methods of time-dependent dynamical mean-field theory. Moreover, we find that a correct description of the system requires, in addition to exchange, a new kind of magnetic interaction, that we name "twist exchange", which formally resembles Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya coupling, but is not due to spin-orbit, and is actually due to an effective three-spin interaction. Our theory allows the evaluation of the related time-dependent parameters as well.
  • We demonstrate that the profile of the space-resolved spectral function at finite temperature provides a signature of Wigner localization for electrons in quantum wires and semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Our numerical evidence is based on the exact diagonalization of the microscopic Hamiltonian of few particles interacting in gate-defined quantum dots. The minimal temperature required to suppress residual exchange effects in the spectral function image of (nanotubes) quantum wires lies in the (sub-) Kelvin range.
  • We demonstrate that electrons in quantum dots defined by electrostatic gates in semiconductor nanotubes freeze orderly in space realizing a `Wigner molecule'. Our exact diagonalisation calculations uncover the features of the electron molecule, which may be accessed by tunneling spectroscopy -indeed some of them have already been observed by Deshpande and Bockrath [Nature Phys. 4, 314 (2008)]. We show that numerical results are satisfactorily reproduced by a simple ansatz vibrational wave function: electrons have localized wave functions, like nuclei in an ordinary molecule, whereas low-energy excitations are collective vibrations of electrons around their equilibrium positions.
  • Few-electron states in carbon-nanotube quantum dots are studied by means of the configuration-interaction method. The peculiar non-interacting feature of the tunneling spectrum for two electrons, recently measured by Kuemmeth et al. [Nature 452, 448 (2008)], is explained by the splitting of a low-lying isospin multiplet due to spin-orbit interaction. Nevertheless, the strongly-interacting ground state forms a `Wigner molecule' made of electrons localized in space. Signatures of the electron molecule may be seen in tunneling spectra by varying the tunable dot confinement potential.