• Internal shocks provide a plausible heating mechanism in the jets of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Shocks occurring below the jet photosphere are mediated by radiation. It was previously found that radiation mediated shocks (RMSs) inside GRB jets are inefficient photon producers, and the photons that mediate the RMS must originate from an earlier stage of the explosion. We show that this conclusion is valid only for non-magnetized jets. RMSs that propagate in moderately magnetized plasma develop a collisionless subshock which locally heats the plasma to a relativistic temperature, and the hot electrons emit copious synchrotron photons inside the RMS. We find that this mechanism is generally effective for mildly relativistic shocks and may be the main source of photons observed in GRBs. We derive a simple analytical formula for the generated photon number per proton, $Z$, which gives $Z=10^5$-$10^6$, consistent with observations. The photons are initially injected with low energies, well below the observed GRB peak. Their number is controlled by two main factors: (1) the abundance of electron-positron pairs created in the shock, which is self-consistently calculated, and (2) the upper limit on the brightness temperature of soft radiation set by induced downscattering. The injected soft photons that survive induced downscattering gain energy in the RMS via bulk Comptonization and shape its nonthermal spectrum.
  • On 2015 March 23, VERITAS responded to a $Swift$-BAT detection of a gamma-ray burst, with observations beginning 270 seconds after the onset of BAT emission, and only 135 seconds after the main BAT emission peak. No statistically significant signal is detected above 140 GeV. The VERITAS upper limit on the fluence in a 40 minute integration corresponds to about 1% of the prompt fluence. Our limit is particularly significant since the very-high-energy (VHE) observation started only $\sim$2 minutes after the prompt emission peaked, and $Fermi$-LAT observations of numerous other bursts have revealed that the high-energy emission is typically delayed relative to the prompt radiation and lasts significantly longer. Also, the proximity of GRB~150323A ($z=0.593$) limits the attenuation by the extragalactic background light to $\sim 50$ % at 100-200 GeV. We conclude that GRB 150323A had an intrinsically very weak high-energy afterglow, or that the GeV spectrum had a turnover below $\sim100$ GeV. If the GRB exploded into the stellar wind of a massive progenitor, the VHE non-detection constrains the wind density parameter to be $A\gtrsim 3\times 10^{11}$ g cm$^{-1}$, consistent with a standard Wolf-Rayet progenitor. Alternatively, the VHE emission from the blast wave would be weak in a very tenuous medium such as the ISM, which therefore cannot be ruled out as the environment of GRB 150323A.
  • In this work we explore the evolution of magnetic fields inside strongly magnetized neutron stars in axisymmetry. We model numerically the coupled field evolution in the core and the crust. Our code models the Hall drift and Ohmic effects in the crust, the back-reaction on the field from magnetically-induced elastic deformation of the crust, the magnetic twist exchange between the crust and the core, and the drift of superconducting flux tubes inside the core. The correct hydromagnetic equilibrium is enforced in the core. We find that i) The Hall attractor found by Gourgouliatos and Cumming in the crust exists also for configurations when the B-field penetrates into the core. However, the evolution timescale for the core-penetrating fields is dramatically different than that of the fields confined to the crust. ii) The combination of Jones' flux tube drift and Ohmic dissipation in the crust can deplete the pulsar magnetic fields on the timescale of $150$ Myr if the crust is hot ($T\sim2\times10^8$ K), but acts on much slower timescales for cold neutron stars, such as recycled pulsars ($\sim 1.8 $ Gyr, depending on impurity levels). iii) The outward motion of superfluid vortices during the rapid spin-down of a young highly magnetized pulsar, can result in a partial expulsion of flux from the core when $B\lesssim 10^{13}$ G. However for $B\gtrsim2\times 10^{13}$ G, the combination of a stronger magnetic field and a longer spin period implies that the core field cannot be expelled.
  • Sub-photospheric shock dissipation is one of the main proposed mechanisms for producing the prompt gamma-ray burst (GRB) emission. Such shocks are mediated by scattering of radiation. We introduce a time dependent, special relativistic code which dynamically couples Monte Carlo radiative transfer to the flow hydrodynamics. The code also self-consistently implements electron-positron pair production and annihilation. We simulate shocks with properties relevant for GRBs and study the steady-state solutions, which are accurate deep below the jet photosphere. The shock generates a power-law photon spectrum through the first-order Fermi mechanism, extending upwards from the typical upstream photon energy. Strong shocks (for which the downstream pressure is much larger than the upstream pressure) have rising $\nu F_\nu$ shock spectra. The spectrum extends up to $\epsilon_{max} \equiv E_{max}/m_e c^2 \sim v^2$ for non-relativistic shocks, where $m_e$ is the electron rest mass and $v$ is the relative speed between the upstream and downstream in units of the speed of light $c$. For mildly relativistic shocks the power law softens at $\epsilon \gtrsim 10^{-1}$ due to Klein-Nishina effects, and shocks with $v\gamma \gtrsim 1$, where $\gamma \equiv (1-v^2)^{-1/2}$, produce electron-positron pairs. As an example, a strong shock with $v\gamma = 3$ and a photon-to-proton ratio of $n_\gamma/n_p = 2 \times 10^5$ has a peak pair-to-proton ratio of $Z_\pm \approx 225$. The main effect of pairs in a steady-state shock is to decrease its spatial width by a factor of $\sim Z_\pm$. The post-shock spectrum thermalizes in the downstream. In absence of emission and absorption processes, kinetic equilibrium at temperature $\theta_d \equiv kT_d/m_e c^2 \approx \epsilon_d/3$ is reached at an optical depth of $\tau \gg \theta_d^{-1}$ behind the shock, where $\epsilon_d$ is the average downstream photon energy.
  • We review electrodynamics of rotating magnetized neutron stars, from the early vacuum model to recent numerical experiments with plasma-filled magnetospheres. Significant progress became possible due to the development of global particle-in-cell simulations which capture particle acceleration, emission of high-energy photons, and electron-positron pair creation. The numerical experiments show from first principles how and where electric gaps form, and promise to explain the observed pulsar activity from radio waves to gamma-rays.
  • The discovery of novae as sources of ~GeV gamma-rays highlights the key role of shocks and relativistic particle acceleration in these transient systems. Although there is evidence for a spectral cut-off above energies ~1-100 GeV at particular epochs in some novae, the maximum particle energy achieved in these accelerators has remained an open question. The high densities of the nova ejecta (~10 orders of magnitude larger than in supernova remnants) render the gas far upstream of the shock neutral and shielded from ionizing radiation. The amplification of the magnetic field needed for diffusive shock acceleration requires ionized gas, thus confining the acceleration process to a narrow photo-ionized layer immediately ahead of the shock. Based on the growth rate in this layer of the hybrid non-resonant cosmic ray current-driven instability (considering also ion-neutral damping), we quantify the maximum particle energy, Emax, across the range of shock velocities and upstream densities of interest. We find values of Emax ~ 10 GeV - 10 TeV, which are broadly consistent with the inferred spectral cut-offs, but which could also in principle lead to emission extending to higher energies >100 GeV accessible to atmosphere Cherenkov telescopes, such as the planned Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). Detecting TeV neutrinos with IceCube in hadronic scenarios appears to be more challenging, although the prospects are improved if the shock power during the earliest, densest phases of the nova outburst is higher than is implied by the observed GeV light curves, due to downscattering of the gamma-rays by electrons within the ejecta. Novae provide ideal nearby laboratories to study magnetic field amplification and the onset of cosmic ray acceleration, because other time-dependent sources (e.g. radio supernovae) typically occur too distant to detect as gamma-ray sources.
  • Jet heating via nuclear collisions may be the main mechanism for gamma-ray burst (GRB) emission. Besides producing the observed gamma-rays, collisional heating must generate 10-100 GeV neutrinos, implying a close relation between the neutrino and gamma-ray luminosities. We exploit this theoretical relation to make predictions for possible GRB detections by IceCube+DeepCore. To estimate the expected neutrino signal, we use the largest sample of bursts observed by BATSE in 1991-2000. A GRB neutrino could have been detected if IceCube+DeepCore operated at that time. Detection of 10-100 GeV neutrinos would have significant implications, shedding light on the composition of GRB jets and their Lorentz factors. This could be an important target in designing future upgrades of the IceCube+DeepCore observatory.
  • We report the discovery of 3.76-s pulsations from a new burst source near Sgr A* observed by the NuSTAR Observatory. The strong signal from SGR J1745-29 presents a complex pulse profile modulated with pulsed fraction 27+/-3 % in the 3-10 keV band. Two observations spaced 9 days apart yield a spin-down rate of Pdot = (6.5+/-1.4)x10^{-12}. This implies a magnetic field B = 1.6x10^14 G, spin-down power Edot = 5x10^33 erg/s, and characteristic age P/2Pdot = 9x10^3 yr, for the rotating dipole model. However, the current Pdot may be erratic, especially during outburst. The flux and modulation remained steady during the observations and the 3-79 keV spectrum is well fitted by a combined blackbody plus power-law model with temperature kT_BB = 0.96+/-0.02 keV and photon index = 1.5+/-0.4, respectively. The neutral hydrogen column density (nH ~ 1.4x10^23 cm^{-2}) measured by NuSTAR and Swift suggests that SGR J1745-29 is located at or near the Galactic Center. The lack of an X-ray counterpart in the published Chandra survey catalog sets a quiescent 2-8 keV luminosity limit of Lx ~< 10^32 erg/s. The bursting, timing, and spectral properties indicate a transient magnetar undergoing an outburst with 2-79 keV luminosity up to 3.5x10^35 erg/s for a distance of 8 kpc. SGR J1745-29 joins a growing subclass of transient magnetars, indicating that many magnetars in quiescence remain undetected in the X-ray band or have been detected as high-B radio pulsars. The peculiar location of SGR J1745-29 has important implications for the formation and dynamics of neutron stars in the Galactic Center region.
  • We highlight recent theoretical and observational progress in several areas of neutron star astrophysics, and discuss the prospect for advances in the next decade.