• While the vast majority of multiple-planet systems have their orbital angular momentum axes aligned with the spin axis of their host star, Kepler-56 is an exception: its two transiting planets are coplanar yet misaligned by at least 40 degrees with respect to their host star. Additional follow-up observations of Kepler-56 suggest the presence of a massive, non-transiting companion that may help explain this misalignment. We model the transit data along with Keck/HIRES and HARPS-N radial velocity data to update the masses of the two transiting planets and infer the physical properties of the third, non-transiting planet. We employ a Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampler to calculate the best-fitting orbital parameters and their uncertainties for each planet. We find the outer planet has a period of 1002 $\pm$ 5 days and minimum mass of 5.61 $\pm$ 0.38 Jupiter masses. We also place a 95% upper limit of 0.80 m/s/yr on long-term trends caused by additional, more distant companions.
  • [Abridged] The Study Analysis Group 8 of the NASA Exoplanet Analysis Group was convened to assess the current capabilities and the future potential of the precise radial velocity (PRV) method to advance the NASA goal to "search for planetary bodies and Earth-like planets in orbit around other stars.: (U.S. National Space Policy, June 28, 2010). PRVs complement other exoplanet detection methods, for example offering a direct path to obtaining the bulk density and thus the structure and composition of transiting exoplanets. Our analysis builds upon previous community input, including the ExoPlanet Community Report chapter on radial velocities in 2008, the 2010 Decadal Survey of Astronomy, the Penn State Precise Radial Velocities Workshop response to the Decadal Survey in 2010, and the NSF Portfolio Review in 2012. The radial-velocity detection of exoplanets is strongly endorsed by both the Astro 2010 Decadal Survey "New Worlds, New Horizons" and the NSF Portfolio Review, and the community has recommended robust investment in PRVs. The demands on telescope time for the above mission support, especially for systems of small planets, will exceed the number of nights available using instruments now in operation by a factor of at least several for TESS alone. Pushing down towards true Earth twins will require more photons (i.e. larger telescopes), more stable spectrographs than are currently available, better calibration, and better correction for stellar jitter. We outline four hypothetical situations for PRV work necessary to meet NASA mission exoplanet science objectives.
  • The transiting exoplanet WASP-18b was discovered in 2008 by the Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP) project. The Spitzer Exoplanet Target of Opportunity Program observed secondary eclipses of WASP-18b using Spitzer's Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) in the 3.6 micron and 5.8 micron bands on 2008 December 20, and in the 4.5 micron and 8.0 micron bands on 2008 December 24. We report eclipse depths of 0.30 +/- 0.02%, 0.39 +/- 0.02%, 0.37 +/- 0.03%, 0.41 +/- 0.02%, and brightness temperatures of 3100 +/- 90, 3310 +/- 130, 3080 +/- 140 and 3120 +/- 110 K in order of increasing wavelength. WASP-18b is one of the hottest planets yet discovered - as hot as an M-class star. The planet's pressure-temperature profile most likely features a thermal inversion. The observations also require WASP-18b to have near-zero albedo and almost no redistribution of energy from the day-side to the night side of the planet.
  • We observed two secondary eclipses of the exoplanet WASP-12b using the Infrared Array Camera on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The close proximity of WASP-12b to its G-type star results in extreme tidal forces capable of inducing apsidal precession with a period as short as a few decades. This precession would be measurable if the orbit had a significant eccentricity, leading to an estimate of the tidal Love number and an assessment of the degree of central concentration in the planetary interior. An initial ground-based secondary eclipse phase reported by Lopez-Morales et al. (0.510 +/- 0.002) implied eccentricity at the 4.5 sigma level. The spectroscopic orbit of Hebb et al. has eccentricity 0.049 +/- 0.015, a 3 sigma result, implying an eclipse phase of 0.509 +/- 0.007. However, there is a well documented tendency of spectroscopic data to overestimate small eccentricities. Our eclipse phases are 0.5010 +/- 0.0006 (3.6 and 5.8 microns) and 0.5006 +/- 0.0007 (4.5 and 8.0 microns). An unlikely orbital precession scenario invoking an alignment of the orbit during the Spitzer observations could have explained this apparent discrepancy, but the final eclipse phase of Lopez-Morales et al. (0.510 -0.006 / +0.007) is consistent with a circular orbit at better than 2 sigma. An orbit fit to all the available transit, eclipse, and radial-velocity data indicates precession at <1 sigma; a non-precessing solution fits better. We also comment on analysis and reporting for Spitzer exoplanet data in light of recent re-analyses.
  • The carbon-to-oxygen ratio (C/O) in a planet provides critical information about its primordial origins and subsequent evolution. A primordial C/O greater than 0.8 causes a carbide-dominated interior as opposed to a silicate-dominated composition as found on Earth, and the atmospheres can also differ from those in the Solar System. The solar C/O is 0.54. Here we report an analysis of dayside multi-wavelength photometry of the transiting hot-Jupiter WASP-12b that reveals C/O >= 1 in its atmosphere. The atmosphere is abundant in CO. It is depleted in water vapor and enhanced in methane by over two orders of magnitude each compared to a solar-abundance chemical-equilibrium model at the expected temperatures. We also find that the extremely irradiated atmosphere (T > 2,500 K) of WASP-12b lacks a prominent thermal inversion, or a stratosphere, and has very efficient day- night energy circulation. The absence of a strong thermal inversion is in stark contrast to theoretical predictions for the most highly irradiated hot-Jupiter atmospheres.
  • We present statistically robust observational evidence which imposes new limits on dynamo saturation in young solar-type stars. These are inferred from the increasing amplitude of the V-band optical flux with rotation, caused by the filling of the disc with surface spots in a non-axisymmetric pattern. Assuming spot coverage acts as a tracer of the total magnetic surface flux we find that the magnetic activity saturates at a level at least 6 -- 10 times greater than that inferred from chromospheric and transition line indicators. We suggest that these new limits imply a minimum rotation for saturation of the dynamo and that for high rotation rates starspot coverage acts as an alternative diagnostic for the stellar dynamo to the chromospheric and transition region line emission fluxes. The fact that the dynamo does not appear to saturate at the low rotation rates indicated by chromospheric indicators should assist evolutionary braking models that have to explain the sudden spin-down of young fast rotating G-dwarfs. ( + 3 figures, available on request) To appear in Astronomy and Astrophysics (A&A latex style file, laa.sty, included at beginning of file)
  • We present a new technique for estimating the distance to young open clusters. The method requires accurate measurement of the axial rotation period of late-type members of the cluster: rotation periods are first combined with projected rotation velocities and an estimate of the angular diameter for each star -- obtained using the Barnes-Evans relation between colour and surface brightness. A 'best' cluster distance estimate is then determined using standard techniques from the theory of order statistics which are in common use in the general statistics literature. It is hoped that this new method will prove a useful adjoint to more traditional distance methods, and will provide a better %determination of the distance scale within the solar neighbourhood. (Figures / preprint available on request)