• Most existing datasets for speaker identification contain samples obtained under quite constrained conditions, and are usually hand-annotated, hence limited in size. The goal of this paper is to generate a large scale text-independent speaker identification dataset collected 'in the wild'. We make two contributions. First, we propose a fully automated pipeline based on computer vision techniques to create the dataset from open-source media. Our pipeline involves obtaining videos from YouTube; performing active speaker verification using a two-stream synchronization Convolutional Neural Network (CNN), and confirming the identity of the speaker using CNN based facial recognition. We use this pipeline to curate VoxCeleb which contains hundreds of thousands of 'real world' utterances for over 1,000 celebrities. Our second contribution is to apply and compare various state of the art speaker identification techniques on our dataset to establish baseline performance. We show that a CNN based architecture obtains the best performance for both identification and verification.
  • We propose and investigate an identity sensitive joint embedding of face and voice. Such an embedding enables cross-modal retrieval from voice to face and from face to voice. We make the following four contributions: first, we show that the embedding can be learnt from videos of talking faces, without requiring any identity labels, using a form of cross-modal self-supervision; second, we develop a curriculum learning schedule for hard negative mining targeted to this task, that is essential for learning to proceed successfully; third, we demonstrate and evaluate cross-modal retrieval for identities unseen and unheard during training over a number of scenarios and establish a benchmark for this novel task; finally, we show an application of using the joint embedding for automatically retrieving and labelling characters in TV dramas.
  • Navigating through unstructured environments is a basic capability of intelligent creatures, and thus is of fundamental interest in the study and development of artificial intelligence. Long-range navigation is a complex cognitive task that relies on developing an internal representation of space, grounded by recognisable landmarks and robust visual processing, that can simultaneously support continuous self-localisation ("I am here") and a representation of the goal ("I am going there"). Building upon recent research that applies deep reinforcement learning to maze navigation problems, we present an end-to-end deep reinforcement learning approach that can be applied on a city scale. Recognising that successful navigation relies on integration of general policies with locale-specific knowledge, we propose a dual pathway architecture that allows locale-specific features to be encapsulated, while still enabling transfer to multiple cities. We present an interactive navigation environment that uses Google StreetView for its photographic content and worldwide coverage, and demonstrate that our learning method allows agents to learn to navigate multiple cities and to traverse to target destinations that may be kilometres away. A video summarizing our research and showing the trained agent in diverse city environments as well as on the transfer task is available at: https://sites.google.com/view/streetlearn.
  • Our goal is to isolate individual speakers from multi-talker simultaneous speech in videos. Existing works in this area have focussed on trying to separate utterances from known speakers in controlled environments. In this paper, we propose a deep audio-visual speech enhancement network that is able to separate a speaker's voice given lip regions in the corresponding video, by predicting both the magnitude and the phase of the target signal. The method is applicable to speakers unheard and unseen during training, and for unconstrained environments. We demonstrate strong quantitative and qualitative results, isolating extremely challenging real-world examples.
  • We introduce a seemingly impossible task: given only an audio clip of someone speaking, decide which of two face images is the speaker. In this paper we study this, and a number of related cross-modal tasks, aimed at answering the question: how much can we infer from the voice about the face and vice versa? We study this task "in the wild", employing the datasets that are now publicly available for face recognition from static images (VGGFace) and speaker identification from audio (VoxCeleb). These provide training and testing scenarios for both static and dynamic testing of cross-modal matching. We make the following contributions: (i) we introduce CNN architectures for both binary and multi-way cross-modal face and audio matching, (ii) we compare dynamic testing (where video information is available, but the audio is not from the same video) with static testing (where only a single still image is available), and (iii) we use human testing as a baseline to calibrate the difficulty of the task. We show that a CNN can indeed be trained to solve this task in both the static and dynamic scenarios, and is even well above chance on 10-way classification of the face given the voice. The CNN matches human performance on easy examples (e.g. different gender across faces) but exceeds human performance on more challenging examples (e.g. faces with the same gender, age and nationality).
  • We present a method for using previously-trained 'teacher' agents to kickstart the training of a new 'student' agent. To this end, we leverage ideas from policy distillation and population based training. Our method places no constraints on the architecture of the teacher or student agents, and it regulates itself to allow the students to surpass their teachers in performance. We show that, on a challenging and computationally-intensive multi-task benchmark (DMLab-30), kickstarted training improves the data efficiency of new agents, making it significantly easier to iterate on their design. We also show that the same kickstarting pipeline can allow a single student agent to leverage multiple 'expert' teachers which specialize on individual tasks. In this setting kickstarting yields surprisingly large gains, with the kickstarted agent matching the performance of an agent trained from scratch in almost 10x fewer steps, and surpassing its final performance by 42 percent. Kickstarting is conceptually simple and can easily be incorporated into reinforcement learning experiments.
  • Recent approaches for high accuracy detection and tracking of object categories in video consist of complex multistage solutions that become more cumbersome each year. In this paper we propose a ConvNet architecture that jointly performs detection and tracking, solving the task in a simple and effective way. Our contributions are threefold: (i) we set up a ConvNet architecture for simultaneous detection and tracking, using a multi-task objective for frame-based object detection and across-frame track regression; (ii) we introduce correlation features that represent object co-occurrences across time to aid the ConvNet during tracking; and (iii) we link the frame level detections based on our across-frame tracklets to produce high accuracy detections at the video level. Our ConvNet architecture for spatiotemporal object detection is evaluated on the large-scale ImageNet VID dataset where it achieves state-of-the-art results. Our approach provides better single model performance than the winning method of the last ImageNet challenge while being conceptually much simpler. Finally, we show that by increasing the temporal stride we can dramatically increase the tracker speed.
  • The top-k error is a common measure of performance in machine learning and computer vision. In practice, top-k classification is typically performed with deep neural networks trained with the cross-entropy loss. Theoretical results indeed suggest that cross-entropy is an optimal learning objective for such a task in the limit of infinite data. In the context of limited and noisy data however, the use of a loss function that is specifically designed for top-k classification can bring significant improvements. Our empirical evidence suggests that the loss function must be smooth and have non-sparse gradients in order to work well with deep neural networks. Consequently, we introduce a family of smoothed loss functions that are suited to top-k optimization via deep learning. The widely used cross-entropy is a special case of our family. Evaluating our smooth loss functions is computationally challenging: a na\"ive algorithm would require $\mathcal{O}(\binom{n}{k})$ operations, where n is the number of classes. Thanks to a connection to polynomial algebra and a divide-and-conquer approach, we provide an algorithm with a time complexity of $\mathcal{O}(k n)$. Furthermore, we present a novel approximation to obtain fast and stable algorithms on GPUs with single floating point precision. We compare the performance of the cross-entropy loss and our margin-based losses in various regimes of noise and data size, for the predominant use case of k=5. Our investigation reveals that our loss is more robust to noise and overfitting than cross-entropy.
  • The paucity of videos in current action classification datasets (UCF-101 and HMDB-51) has made it difficult to identify good video architectures, as most methods obtain similar performance on existing small-scale benchmarks. This paper re-evaluates state-of-the-art architectures in light of the new Kinetics Human Action Video dataset. Kinetics has two orders of magnitude more data, with 400 human action classes and over 400 clips per class, and is collected from realistic, challenging YouTube videos. We provide an analysis on how current architectures fare on the task of action classification on this dataset and how much performance improves on the smaller benchmark datasets after pre-training on Kinetics. We also introduce a new Two-Stream Inflated 3D ConvNet (I3D) that is based on 2D ConvNet inflation: filters and pooling kernels of very deep image classification ConvNets are expanded into 3D, making it possible to learn seamless spatio-temporal feature extractors from video while leveraging successful ImageNet architecture designs and even their parameters. We show that, after pre-training on Kinetics, I3D models considerably improve upon the state-of-the-art in action classification, reaching 80.9% on HMDB-51 and 98.0% on UCF-101.
  • The goal of this paper is the automatic identification of characters in TV and feature film material. In contrast to standard approaches to this task, which rely on the weak supervision afforded by transcripts and subtitles, we propose a new method requiring only a cast list. This list is used to obtain images of actors from freely available sources on the web, providing a form of partial supervision for this task. In using images of actors to recognize characters, we make the following three contributions: (i) We demonstrate that an automated semi-supervised learning approach is able to adapt from the actor's face to the character's face, including the face context of the hair; (ii) By building voice models for every character, we provide a bridge between frontal faces (for which there is plenty of actor-level supervision) and profile (for which there is very little or none); and (iii) by combining face context and speaker identification, we are able to identify characters with partially occluded faces and extreme facial poses. Results are presented on the TV series 'Sherlock' and the feature film 'Casablanca'. We achieve the state-of-the-art on the Casablanca benchmark, surpassing previous methods that have used the stronger supervision available from transcripts.
  • As the success of deep models has led to their deployment in all areas of computer vision, it is increasingly important to understand how these representations work and what they are capturing. In this paper, we shed light on deep spatiotemporal representations by visualizing what two-stream models have learned in order to recognize actions in video. We show that local detectors for appearance and motion objects arise to form distributed representations for recognizing human actions. Key observations include the following. First, cross-stream fusion enables the learning of true spatiotemporal features rather than simply separate appearance and motion features. Second, the networks can learn local representations that are highly class specific, but also generic representations that can serve a range of classes. Third, throughout the hierarchy of the network, features become more abstract and show increasing invariance to aspects of the data that are unimportant to desired distinctions (e.g. motion patterns across various speeds). Fourth, visualizations can be used not only to shed light on learned representations, but also to reveal idiosyncracies of training data and to explain failure cases of the system.
  • We investigate methods for combining multiple self-supervised tasks--i.e., supervised tasks where data can be collected without manual labeling--in order to train a single visual representation. First, we provide an apples-to-apples comparison of four different self-supervised tasks using the very deep ResNet-101 architecture. We then combine tasks to jointly train a network. We also explore lasso regularization to encourage the network to factorize the information in its representation, and methods for "harmonizing" network inputs in order to learn a more unified representation. We evaluate all methods on ImageNet classification, PASCAL VOC detection, and NYU depth prediction. Our results show that deeper networks work better, and that combining tasks--even via a naive multi-head architecture--always improves performance. Our best joint network nearly matches the PASCAL performance of a model pre-trained on ImageNet classification, and matches the ImageNet network on NYU depth prediction.
  • We propose a novel ConvNet model for predicting 2D human body poses in an image. The model regresses a heatmap representation for each body keypoint, and is able to learn and represent both the part appearances and the context of the part configuration. We make the following three contributions: (i) an architecture combining a feed forward module with a recurrent module, where the recurrent module can be run iteratively to improve the performance, (ii) the model can be trained end-to-end and from scratch, with auxiliary losses incorporated to improve performance, (iii) we investigate whether keypoint visibility can also be predicted. The model is evaluated on two benchmark datasets. The result is a simple architecture that achieves performance on par with the state of the art, but without the complexity of a graphical model stage (or layers).
  • A significant proportion of patients scanned in a clinical setting have follow-up scans. We show in this work that such longitudinal scans alone can be used as a form of 'free' self-supervision for training a deep network. We demonstrate this self-supervised learning for the case of T2-weighted sagittal lumbar Magnetic Resonance Images (MRIs). A Siamese convolutional neural network (CNN) is trained using two losses: (i) a contrastive loss on whether the scan is of the same person (i.e. longitudinal) or not, together with (ii) a classification loss on predicting the level of vertebral bodies. The performance of this pre-trained network is then assessed on a grading classification task. We experiment on a dataset of 1016 subjects, 423 possessing follow-up scans, with the end goal of learning the disc degeneration radiological gradings attached to the intervertebral discs. We show that the performance of the pre-trained CNN on the supervised classification task is (i) superior to that of a network trained from scratch; and (ii) requires far fewer annotated training samples to reach an equivalent performance to that of the network trained from scratch.
  • We consider the question: what can be learnt by looking at and listening to a large number of unlabelled videos? There is a valuable, but so far untapped, source of information contained in the video itself -- the correspondence between the visual and the audio streams, and we introduce a novel "Audio-Visual Correspondence" learning task that makes use of this. Training visual and audio networks from scratch, without any additional supervision other than the raw unconstrained videos themselves, is shown to successfully solve this task, and, more interestingly, result in good visual and audio representations. These features set the new state-of-the-art on two sound classification benchmarks, and perform on par with the state-of-the-art self-supervised approaches on ImageNet classification. We also demonstrate that the network is able to localize objects in both modalities, as well as perform fine-grained recognition tasks.
  • We present a method for generating a video of a talking face. The method takes as inputs: (i) still images of the target face, and (ii) an audio speech segment; and outputs a video of the target face lip synched with the audio. The method runs in real time and is applicable to faces and audio not seen at training time. To achieve this we propose an encoder-decoder CNN model that uses a joint embedding of the face and audio to generate synthesised talking face video frames. The model is trained on tens of hours of unlabelled videos. We also show results of re-dubbing videos using speech from a different person.
  • We present an automatic method to describe clinically useful information about scanning, and to guide image interpretation in ultrasound (US) videos of the fetal heart. Our method is able to jointly predict the visibility, viewing plane, location and orientation of the fetal heart at the frame level. The contributions of the paper are three-fold: (i) a convolutional neural network architecture is developed for a multi-task prediction, which is computed by sliding a 3x3 window spatially through convolutional maps. (ii) an anchor mechanism and Intersection over Union (IoU) loss are applied for improving localization accuracy. (iii) a recurrent architecture is designed to recursively compute regional convolutional features temporally over sequential frames, allowing each prediction to be conditioned on the whole video. This results in a spatial-temporal model that precisely describes detailed heart parameters in challenging US videos. We report results on a real-world clinical dataset, where our method achieves performance on par with expert annotations.
  • We describe the DeepMind Kinetics human action video dataset. The dataset contains 400 human action classes, with at least 400 video clips for each action. Each clip lasts around 10s and is taken from a different YouTube video. The actions are human focussed and cover a broad range of classes including human-object interactions such as playing instruments, as well as human-human interactions such as shaking hands. We describe the statistics of the dataset, how it was collected, and give some baseline performance figures for neural network architectures trained and tested for human action classification on this dataset. We also carry out a preliminary analysis of whether imbalance in the dataset leads to bias in the classifiers.
  • We present a novel layerwise optimization algorithm for the learning objective of Piecewise-Linear Convolutional Neural Networks (PL-CNNs), a large class of convolutional neural networks. Specifically, PL-CNNs employ piecewise linear non-linearities such as the commonly used ReLU and max-pool, and an SVM classifier as the final layer. The key observation of our approach is that the problem corresponding to the parameter estimation of a layer can be formulated as a difference-of-convex (DC) program, which happens to be a latent structured SVM. We optimize the DC program using the concave-convex procedure, which requires us to iteratively solve a structured SVM problem. This allows to design an optimization algorithm with an optimal learning rate that does not require any tuning. Using the MNIST, CIFAR and ImageNet data sets, we show that our approach always improves over the state of the art variants of backpropagation and scales to large data and large network settings.
  • The goal of this work is to recognise phrases and sentences being spoken by a talking face, with or without the audio. Unlike previous works that have focussed on recognising a limited number of words or phrases, we tackle lip reading as an open-world problem - unconstrained natural language sentences, and in the wild videos. Our key contributions are: (1) a 'Watch, Listen, Attend and Spell' (WLAS) network that learns to transcribe videos of mouth motion to characters; (2) a curriculum learning strategy to accelerate training and to reduce overfitting; (3) a 'Lip Reading Sentences' (LRS) dataset for visual speech recognition, consisting of over 100,000 natural sentences from British television. The WLAS model trained on the LRS dataset surpasses the performance of all previous work on standard lip reading benchmark datasets, often by a significant margin. This lip reading performance beats a professional lip reader on videos from BBC television, and we also demonstrate that visual information helps to improve speech recognition performance even when the audio is available.
  • In this paper we investigate 3D shape attributes as a means to understand the shape of an object in a single image. To this end, we make a number of contributions: (i) we introduce and define a set of 3D shape attributes, including planarity, symmetry and occupied space; (ii) we show that such properties can be successfully inferred from a single image using a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN); (iii) we introduce a 143K image dataset of sculptures with 2197 works over 242 artists for training and evaluating the CNN; (iv) we show that the 3D attributes trained on this dataset generalize to images of other (non-sculpture) object classes; (v) we show that the CNN also provides a shape embedding that can be used to match previously unseen sculptures largely independent of viewpoint; and furthermore (vi) we analyze how the CNN predicts these attributes.
  • We consider the design of an image representation that embeds and aggregates a set of local descriptors into a single vector. Popular representations of this kind include the bag-of-visual-words, the Fisher vector and the VLAD. When two such image representations are compared with the dot-product, the image-to-image similarity can be interpreted as a match kernel. In match kernels, one has to deal with interference, i.e. with the fact that even if two descriptors are unrelated, their matching score may contribute to the overall similarity. We formalise this problem and propose two related solutions, both aimed at equalising the individual contributions of the local descriptors in the final representation. These methods modify the aggregation stage by including a set of per-descriptor weights. They differ by the objective function that is optimised to compute those weights. The first is a "democratisation" strategy that aims at equalising the relative importance of each descriptor in the set comparison metric. The second one involves equalising the match of a single descriptor to the aggregated vector. These concurrent methods give a substantial performance boost over the state of the art in image search with short or mid-size vectors, as demonstrated by our experiments on standard public image retrieval benchmarks.
  • Recent applications of Convolutional Neural Networks (ConvNets) for human action recognition in videos have proposed different solutions for incorporating the appearance and motion information. We study a number of ways of fusing ConvNet towers both spatially and temporally in order to best take advantage of this spatio-temporal information. We make the following findings: (i) that rather than fusing at the softmax layer, a spatial and temporal network can be fused at a convolution layer without loss of performance, but with a substantial saving in parameters; (ii) that it is better to fuse such networks spatially at the last convolutional layer than earlier, and that additionally fusing at the class prediction layer can boost accuracy; finally (iii) that pooling of abstract convolutional features over spatiotemporal neighbourhoods further boosts performance. Based on these studies we propose a new ConvNet architecture for spatiotemporal fusion of video snippets, and evaluate its performance on standard benchmarks where this architecture achieves state-of-the-art results.
  • The goal of this work is to recognise and localise short temporal signals in image time series, where strong supervision is not available for training. To this end we propose an image encoding that concisely represents human motion in a video sequence in a form that is suitable for learning with a ConvNet. The encoding reduces the pose information from an image to a single column, dramatically diminishing the input requirements for the network, but retaining the essential information for recognition. The encoding is applied to the task of recognizing and localizing signed gestures in British Sign Language (BSL) videos. We demonstrate that using the proposed encoding, signs as short as 10 frames duration can be learnt from clips lasting hundreds of frames using only weak (clip level) supervision and with considerable label noise.
  • We propose a personalized ConvNet pose estimator that automatically adapts itself to the uniqueness of a person's appearance to improve pose estimation in long videos. We make the following contributions: (i) we show that given a few high-precision pose annotations, e.g. from a generic ConvNet pose estimator, additional annotations can be generated throughout the video using a combination of image-based matching for temporally distant frames, and dense optical flow for temporally local frames; (ii) we develop an occlusion aware self-evaluation model that is able to automatically select the high-quality and reject the erroneous additional annotations; and (iii) we demonstrate that these high-quality annotations can be used to fine-tune a ConvNet pose estimator and thereby personalize it to lock on to key discriminative features of the person's appearance. The outcome is a substantial improvement in the pose estimates for the target video using the personalized ConvNet compared to the original generic ConvNet. Our method outperforms the state of the art (including top ConvNet methods) by a large margin on two standard benchmarks, as well as on a new challenging YouTube video dataset. Furthermore, we show that training from the automatically generated annotations can be used to improve the performance of a generic ConvNet on other benchmarks.