• We present a detailed study of the nuclear star clusters (NSCs) and massive black holes (BHs) of four of the nearest low-mass early-type galaxies: M32, NGC205, NGC5012, and NGC5206. We measure dynamical masses of both the BHs and NSCs in these galaxies using Gemini/NIFS or VLT/SINFONI stellar kinematics, Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging, and Jeans Anisotropic Models. We detect massive BHs in M32, NGC5102, and NGC5206, while in NGC205, we find only an upper limit. These BH mass estimates are consistent with previous measurements in M32 and NGC205, while those in NGC5102 and NGC5206 are estimated for the first time, and both found to be $<$$10^6~M_{\odot}$. This adds to just a handful of galaxies with dynamically measured sub-million $M_{\odot}$ central BHs. Combining these BH detections with our recent work on NGC404's BH, we find that 80\% (4/5) of nearby, low-mass ($10^9-10^{10}~M_{\odot}$; $\sigma_{\star}\sim20-70$ km/s) early-type galaxies host BHs. Such a high occupation fraction suggests the BH seeds formed in the early epoch of cosmic assembly likely resulted in abundant seeds, favoring a low-mass seed mechanism of the remnants, most likely from the first generation of massive stars. We find dynamical masses of the NSCs ranging from $2-80\times10^6~M_{\odot}$ and compare these masses to scaling relations for NSCs based primarily on photometric mass estimates. Color gradients suggest younger stellar populations lie at the centers of the NSCs in three of the four galaxies (NGC205, NGC5102, and NGC5206), while the morphology of two are complex and are best-fit with multiple morphological components (NGC5102 and NGC5206). The NSC kinematics show they are rotating, especially in M32 and NGC5102 ($V/\sigma_{\star}\sim0.7$).
  • We examine the internal properties of the most massive ultracompact dwarf galaxy (UCD), M59-UCD3, by combining adaptive optics assisted near-IR integral field spectroscopy from Gemini/NIFS, and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging. We use the multi-band HST imaging to create a mass model that suggests and accounts for the presence of multiple stellar populations and structural components. We combine these mass models with kinematics measurements from Gemini/NIFS to find a best-fit stellar mass-to-light ratio ($M/L$) and black hole (BH) mass using Jeans Anisotropic Models (JAM), axisymmetric Schwarzschild models, and triaxial Schwarzschild models. The best fit parameters in the JAM and axisymmetric Schwarzschild models have black holes between 2.5 and 5.9 million solar masses. The triaxial Schwarzschild models point toward a similar BH mass, but show a minimum $\chi^2$ at a BH mass of $\sim 0$. Models with a BH in all three techniques provide better fits to the central $V_{rms}$ profiles, and thus we estimate the BH mass to be $4.2^{+2.1}_{-1.7} \times 10^{6}$ M$_\odot$ (estimated 1$\sigma$ uncertainties). We also present deep radio imaging of M59-UCD3 and two other UCDs in Virgo with dynamical BH mass measurements, and compare these to X-ray measurements to check for consistency with the fundamental plane of BH accretion. We detect faint radio emission in M59cO, but find only upper limits for M60-UCD1 and M59-UCD3 despite X-ray detections in both these sources. The BH mass and nuclear light profile of M59-UCD3 suggests it is the tidally stripped remnant of a $\sim$10$^{9-10}$ M$_\odot$ galaxy.
  • The recent discovery of massive black holes (BHs) in the centers of high-mass ultra compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) suggests that at least some are the stripped nuclear star clusters of dwarf galaxies. We present the first study that investigates whether such massive BHs, and therefore stripped nuclei, also exist in low-mass ($M<10^{7}M_{\odot}$) UCDs. We constrain the BH masses of two UCDs located in Centaurus A (UCD320 and UCD330) using Jeans modeling of the resolved stellar kinematics from adaptive optics VLT/SINFONI data. No massive BHs are found in either UCD. We find a $3\,\sigma$ upper limit on the central BH mass in UCD\,330 of $M_{\bullet}<1.0\times10^{5}M_{\odot}$, which corresponds to 1.7\% of the total mass. This excludes a high mass fraction BH and would only allow a low-mass BHs similar to those claimed to be detected in Local Group GCs. For UCD320, poorer data quality results in a less constraining $3\,\sigma$ upper limit of $M_{\bullet}<1\times10^{6}M_{\odot}$, which is equal to 37.7\% of the total mass. The dynamical $M/L$ of UCD320 and UCD330 are not inflated compared to predictions from stellar population models. The non-detection of BHs in these low-mass UCDs is consistent with the idea that elevated dynamical $M/L$s do indicate the presence of a substantial BH. Despite not detecting massive BHs, these systems could still be stripped nuclei. The strong rotation ($v/\sigma$ of 0.3 to 0.4) in both UCDs and the two-component light profile in UCD330 support the idea that these UCDs may be stripped nuclei of low-mass galaxies where the BH occupation fraction is not yet known.
  • Using HST, we identify circumnuclear ($100$-$500$ pc scale) structures in nine new H$_2$O megamaser host galaxies to understand the flow of matter from kpc-scale galactic structures down to the supermassive black holes (SMBHs) at galactic centers. We double the sample analyzed in a similar way by Greene et al. (2013) and consider the properties of the combined sample of 18 sources. We find that disk-like structure is virtually ubiquitous when we can resolve $<200$ pc scales, in support of the notion that non-axisymmetries on these scales are a necessary condition for SMBH fueling. We perform an analysis of the orientation of our identified nuclear regions and compare it with the orientation of megamaser disks and the kpc-scale disks of the hosts. We find marginal evidence that the disk-like nuclear structures show increasing misalignment from the kpc-scale host galaxy disk as the scale of the structure decreases. In turn, we find that the orientation of both the $\sim100$ pc scale nuclear structures and their host galaxy large-scale disks is consistent with random with respect to the orientation of their respective megamaser disks.
  • We measure the mass function for a sample of 840 young star clusters with ages between 10-300 Myr observed by the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey in M31. The data show clear evidence of a high-mass truncation: only 15 clusters more massive than $10^4$ $M_{\odot}$ are observed, compared to $\sim$100 expected for a canonical $M^{-2}$ pure power-law mass function with the same total number of clusters above the catalog completeness limit. Adopting a Schechter function parameterization, we fit a characteristic truncation mass of $M_c = 8.5^{+2.8}_{-1.8} \times 10^3$ $M_{\odot}$. While previous studies have measured cluster mass function truncations, the characteristic truncation mass we measure is the lowest ever reported. Combining this M31 measurement with previous results, we find that the cluster mass function truncation correlates strongly with the characteristic star formation rate surface density of the host galaxy, where $M_c \propto$ $\langle \Sigma_{\mathrm{SFR}} \rangle^{\sim1.1}$. We also find evidence that suggests the observed $M_c$-$\Sigma_{\mathrm{SFR}}$ relation also applies to globular clusters, linking the two populations via a common formation pathway. If so, globular cluster mass functions could be useful tools for constraining the star formation properties of their progenitor host galaxies in the early Universe.
  • We present the detection of supermassive black holes (BHs) in two Virgo ultracompact dwarf galaxies (UCDs), VUCD3 and M59cO. We use adaptive optics assisted data from the Gemini/NIFS instrument to derive radial velocity dispersion profiles for both objects. Mass models for the two UCDs are created using multi-band Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging, including the modeling of mild color gradients seen in both objects. We then find a best-fit stellar mass-to-light ratio ($M/L$) and BH mass by combining the kinematic data and the deprojected stellar mass profile using Jeans Anisotropic Models (JAM). Assuming axisymmetric isotropic Jeans models, we detect BHs in both objects with masses of $4.4^{+2.5}_{-3.0} \times 10^6$ $M_{\odot}$ in VUCD3 and $5.8^{+2.5}_{-2.8} \times 10^6$ $M_{\odot}$ in M59cO (3$\sigma$ uncertainties). The BH mass is degenerate with the anisotropy parameter, $\beta_z$; for the data to be consistent with no BH requires $\beta_z = 0.4$ and $\beta_z = 0.6$ for VUCD3 and M59cO, respectively. Comparing these values with nuclear star clusters shows that while it is possible that these UCDs are highly radially anisotropic, it seems unlikely. These detections constitute the second and third UCDs known to host supermassive BHs. They both have a high fraction of their total mass in their BH; $\sim$13% for VUCD3 and $\sim$18% for M59cO. They also have low best-fit stellar $M/L$s, supporting the proposed scenario that most massive UCDs host high mass fraction BHs. The properties of the BHs and UCDs are consistent with both objects being the tidally stripped remnants of $\sim$10$^9$ M$_\odot$ galaxies.
  • We present a sample of 224 stars that emit H$\alpha$ (H$\alpha$ stars) in the Andromeda galaxy (M31). The stars were selected from $\sim$ 5000 spectra, collected as part of the Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo survey using Keck II/DEIMOS. We used six-filter Hubble Space Telescope photometry from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury survey to classify and investigate the properties of the H$\alpha$ stars. We identified five distinct categories of H$\alpha$ star: B-type main sequence (MS) stars, `transitioning'-MS (T-MS) stars, red core He burning (RHeB) stars, non-C-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, and C-rich AGB stars. We found $\sim$ 12 per cent of B-type stars exhibit H$\alpha$ emission (Be stars). The frequency of Be to all B stars is known to vary with the metallicity of their environment. Comparing this proportion of Be stars with other environments around the Local Group, the result could indicate that M31 is more metal rich than the Milky Way. We predict that the 17 T-MS H$\alpha$ stars are Be stars evolving off the MS with fading H$\alpha$ emission. We separated RHeB from AGB H$\alpha$ stars. We conclude that the 61 RHeB and AGB stars are likely to be Long Period Variables. We found that $\sim$ 14 per cent of C-rich AGB stars (C stars) emit H$\alpha$, which is an upper limit for the ratio of C-rich Miras to C stars. This catalogue of H$\alpha$ stars will be useful to constrain stellar evolutionary models, calibrate distance indicators for intermediate age populations, and investigate the properties of M31.
  • We explore the nucleus of the nearby 10$^9M_{\odot}$~early-type galaxy (ETGs), NGC~404, using Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/STIS spectroscopy and WFC3 imaging. We first present evidence for nuclear variability in UV, optical, and infrared filters over a time period of 15~years. This variability adds to the already substantial evidence for an accreting black hole at the center of NGC~404. We then redetermine the dynamical black hole mass in NGC~404 including modeling of the nuclear stellar populations. We combine HST/STIS spectroscopy with WFC3 images to create a local color-$M/L$~relation derived from stellar population modeling of the STIS data. We then use this to create a mass model for the nuclear region. We use Jeans modeling to fit this mass model to adaptive optics (AO) stellar kinematic observations from Gemini/NIFS. From our stellar dynamical modeling, we find a 3$\sigma$ upper limit on the black hole mass of $1.5\times10^5M_{\odot}$. Given the accretion evidence for a black hole, this upper limit makes NGC~404 the lowest mass central black hole with dynamical mass constraints. We find that the kinematics of H$_2$ emission line gas show evidence for non-gravitational motions preventing the use of gas dynamical modeling to constrain the black hole mass. Our stellar population modeling also reveals that the central, counter-rotating region of the nuclear cluster is dominated by $\sim$1~Gyr old populations.
  • We use new precision measurements of black hole masses from water megamaser disks to investigate scaling relations between macroscopic galaxy properties and supermassive black hole (BH) mass. The megamaser-derived BH masses span 10^6-10^8 M_sun, while all the galaxy properties that we examine (including stellar mass, central mass density, central velocity dispersion) lie within a narrow range. Thus, no galaxy property correlates tightly with M_BH in ~L* spiral galaxies. Of them all, stellar velocity dispersion provides the tightest relation, but at fixed sigma* the mean megamaser M_BH are offset by -0.6+/-0.1 dex relative to early-type galaxies. Spiral galaxies with non-maser dynamical BH masses do not show this offset. At low mass, we do not yet know the full distribution of BH mass at fixed galaxy property; the non-maser dynamical measurements may miss the low-mass end of the BH distribution due to inability to resolve the spheres of influence and/or megamasers may preferentially occur in lower-mass BHs.
  • We use the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey dataset to perform spatially resolved measurements of star cluster formation efficiency ($\Gamma$), the fraction of stellar mass formed in long-lived star clusters. We use robust star formation history and cluster parameter constraints, obtained through color-magnitude diagram analysis of resolved stellar populations, to study Andromeda's cluster and field populations over the last $\sim$300 Myr. We measure $\Gamma$ of 4-8% for young, 10-100 Myr old populations in M31. We find that cluster formation efficiency varies systematically across the M31 disk, consistent with variations in mid-plane pressure. These $\Gamma$ measurements expand the range of well-studied galactic environments, providing precise constraints in an HI-dominated, low intensity star formation environment. Spatially resolved results from M31 are broadly consistent with previous trends observed on galaxy-integrated scales, where $\Gamma$ increases with increasing star formation rate surface density ($\Sigma_{\mathrm{SFR}}$). However, we can explain observed scatter in the relation and attain better agreement between observations and theoretical models if we account for environmental variations in gas depletion time ($\tau_{\mathrm{dep}}$) when modeling $\Gamma$, accounting for the qualitative shift in star formation behavior when transitioning from a H$_2$-dominated to a HI-dominated interstellar medium. We also demonstrate that $\Gamma$ measurements in high $\Sigma_{\mathrm{SFR}}$ starburst systems are well-explained by $\tau_{\mathrm{dep}}$-dependent fiducial $\Gamma$ models.
  • Globular clusters which exhibit chemical and dynamical complexity have been suggested to be the stripped nuclei of dwarf galaxies (e.g., M54, $\omega$ Cen). We use $N$-body simulations of nuclear star clusters forming via the mergers of star clusters to explore the persistence of substructure in the phase space. We find that the observed level of differentiation is difficult to reconcile with the observed if nuclear clusters form wholly out of the mergers of star clusters. Only the star clusters that merged most recently retain sufficiently distinct kinematics to be distinguishable from the rest of the nuclear cluster though the critical factor is the number of merger events not the elapsed time. In situ star formation must therefore be included to explain the observed properties of nuclear star clusters, in good agreement with previous results.
  • We present a study of spatial variations in the metallicity of old red giant branch stars in the Andromeda galaxy. Photometric metallicity estimates are derived by interpolating isochrones for over seven million stars in the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey. This is the first systematic study of stellar metallicities over the inner 20 kpc of Andromeda's galactic disk. We see a clear metallicity gradient of $-0.020\pm0.004$ dex/kpc from $\sim4-20$ kpc assuming a constant RGB age. This metallicity gradient is derived after correcting for the effects of photometric bias and completeness and dust extinction and is quite insensitive to these effects. The unknown age gradient in M31's disk creates the dominant systematic uncertainty in our derived metallicity gradient. However, spectroscopic analyses of galaxies similar to M31 show that they typically have small age gradients that make this systematic error comparable to the 1$\sigma$ error on our metallicity gradient measurement. In addition to the metallicity gradient, we observe an asymmetric local enhancement in metallicity at radii of 3-6 kpc that appears to be associated with Andromeda's elongated bar. This same region also appears to have an enhanced stellar density and velocity dispersion.
  • We map the distribution of dust in M31 at 25pc resolution, using stellar photometry from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury. We develop a new mapping technique that models the NIR color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of red giant branch (RGB) stars. The model CMDs combine an unreddened foreground of RGB stars with a reddened background population viewed through a log-normal column density distribution of dust. Fits to the model constrain the median extinction, the width of the extinction distribution, and the fraction of reddened stars. The resulting extinction map has >4 times better resolution than maps of dust emission, while providing a more direct measurement of the dust column. There is superb morphological agreement between the new map and maps of the extinction inferred from dust emission by Draine et al. 2014. However, the widely-used Draine & Li (2007) dust models overpredict the observed extinction by a factor of ~2.5, suggesting that M31's true dust mass is lower and that dust grains are significantly more emissive than assumed in Draine et al. (2014). The discrepancy we identify is consistent with similar findings in the Milky Way by the Planck Collaboration (2015), but has a more complex dependence on parameters from the Draine & Li (2007) dust models. We also show that the discrepancy with the Draine et al. (2014) map is lowest where the interstellar radiation field has a harder spectrum than average. We discuss possible improvements to the CMD dust mapping technique, and explore further applications.
  • We explore the ratio (C/M) of carbon-rich to oxygen-rich thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch(TP-AGB) stars in the disk of M31 using a combination of moderate-resolution optical spectroscopy from the Spectroscopic Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo (SPLASH) survey and six-filter Hubble Space Telescope photometry from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey.Carbon stars were identified spectroscopically. Oxygen-rich M-stars were identifed using three different photometric definitions designed to mimic, and thus evaluate, selection techniques common in the literature. We calculate the C/M ratio as a function of galactocentric radius, present-day gas-phase oxygen abundance, stellar metallicity, age (via proxy defined as the ratio of TP-AGB stars to red giant branch, RGB, stars), and mean star formation rate over the last 400 Myr. We find statistically significant correlations between log(C/M) and all parameters. These trends are consistent across different M-star selection methods, though the fiducial values change. Of particular note is our observed relationship between log(C/M) and stellar metallicity, which is fully consistent with the trend seen across Local Group satellite galaxies. The fact that this trend persists in stellar populations with very different star formation histories indicates that the C/M ratio is governed by stellar properties alone.
  • NGC 4395 is a bulgeless spiral galaxy, harboring one of the nearest known type 1 Seyfert nuclei. Although there is no consensus on the mass of its central engine, several estimates suggest it to be one of the lightest massive black holes (MBHs) known. We present the first direct dynamical measurement of the mass of this MBH from a combination of two-dimensional gas kinematic data, obtained with the adaptive optics assisted near infrared integral field spectrograph Gemini/NIFS, and high-resolution multiband photometric data from Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3). We use the photometric data to model the shape and stellar mass-to-light ratio (M/L) of the nuclear star cluster. From the Gemini/NIFS observations, we derive the kinematics of warm molecular hydrogen gas as traced by emission through the H$_2$ 1--0 S(1) transition. These kinematics show a clear rotational signal, with a position angle orthogonal to NGC 4395's radio jet. Our best fitting tilted ring models of the kinematics of the molecular hydrogen gas contain a black hole with mass $M=4_{-3}^{+8}\times 10^5$ M$_\odot$ (3$\sigma$ uncertainties) embedded in a nuclear star cluster of mass $M=2 \times 10^6$ M$_\odot$. Our black hole mass measurement is in excellent agreement with the reverberation mapping mass estimate of Peterson et al. (2005), but shows some tension with other mass measurement methods based on accretion signals.
  • We measure the recent star formation history (SFH) across M31 using optical images taken with the \texit{Hubble Space Telescope} as part of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT). We fit the color-magnitude diagrams in ~9000 regions that are ~100 pc $\times$ 100 pc in projected size, covering a 0.5 square degree area (~380 kpc$^2$, deprojected) in the NE quadrant of M31. We show that the SFHs vary significantly on these small spatial scales but that there are also coherent galaxy-wide fluctuations in the SFH back to ~500 Myr, most notably in M31's 10-kpc star-forming ring. We find that the 10-kpc ring is at least 400 Myr old, showing ongoing star formation over the past ~500 Myr. This indicates the presence of molecular gas in the ring over at least 2 dynamical times at this radius. We also find that the ring's position is constant throughout this time, and is stationary at the level of 1 km/s, although there is evidence for broadening of the ring due to diffusion of stars into the disk. Based on existing models of M31's ring features, the lack of evolution in the ring's position makes a purely collisional ring origin highly unlikely. We find that the global SFR has been fairly constant over the last ~500 Myr, though it does show a small increase at 50 Myr that is 1.3 times the average SFR over the past 100 Myr. During the last ~500 Myr, ~60% of all SF occurs in the 10-kpc ring. Finally, we find that in the past 100 Myr, the average SFR over the PHAT survey area is $0.28\pm0.03$ M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ with an average deprojected intensity of $7.3 \times 10^{-4}$ M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ kpc$^{-2}$, which yields a total SFR of ~0.7 M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ when extrapolated to the entire area of M31's disk. This SFR is consistent with measurements from broadband estimates. [abridged]
  • We have undertaken the largest systematic study of the high-mass stellar initial mass function (IMF) to date using the optical color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of 85 resolved, young (4 Myr < t < 25 Myr), intermediate mass star clusters (10^3-10^4 Msun), observed as part of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) program. We fit each cluster's CMD to measure its mass function (MF) slope for stars >2 Msun. For the ensemble of clusters, the distribution of stellar MF slopes is best described by $\Gamma=+1.45^{+0.03}_{-0.06}$ with a very small intrinsic scatter. The data also imply no significant dependencies of the MF slope on cluster age, mass, and size, providing direct observational evidence that the measured MF represents the IMF. This analysis implies that the high-mass IMF slope in M31 clusters is universal with a slope ($\Gamma=+1.45^{+0.03}_{-0.06}$) that is steeper than the canonical Kroupa (+1.30) and Salpeter (+1.35) values. Using our inference model on select Milky Way (MW) and LMC high-mass IMF studies from the literature, we find $\Gamma_{\rm MW} \sim+1.15\pm0.1$ and $\Gamma_{\rm LMC} \sim+1.3\pm0.1$, both with intrinsic scatter of ~0.3-0.4 dex. Thus, while the high-mass IMF in the Local Group may be universal, systematics in literature IMF studies preclude any definitive conclusions; homogenous investigations of the high-mass IMF in the local universe are needed to overcome this limitation. Consequently, the present study represents the most robust measurement of the high-mass IMF slope to date. We have grafted the M31 high-mass IMF slope onto widely used sub-solar mass Kroupa and Chabrier IMFs and show that commonly used UV- and Halpha-based star formation rates should be increased by a factor of ~1.3-1.5 and the number of stars with masses >8 Msun are ~25% fewer than expected for a Salpeter/Kroupa IMF. [abridged]
  • The stellar kinematics of galactic disks are key to constraining disk formation and evolution processes. In this paper, for the first time, we measure the stellar age-velocity dispersion correlation in the inner 20 kpc (3.5 disk scale lengths) of M31 and show that it is dramatically different from that in the Milky Way. We use optical Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys photometry of 5800 individual stars from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey and Keck/DEIMOS radial velocity measurements of the same stars from the Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo (SPLASH) survey. We show that the average line-of-sight velocity dispersion is a steadily increasing function of stellar age exterior to R=10 kpc, increasing from 30 km/s for the young upper main sequence stars to 90 km/s for the old red giant branch stars. This monotonic increase implies that a continuous or recurring process contributed to the evolution of the disk. Both the slope and normalization of the dispersion vs. age relation are significantly larger than in the Milky Way, allowing for the possibility that the disk of M31 has had a more violent history than the disk of the Milky Way, more in line with cosmological predictions. We also find evidence for an inhomogeneous distribution of stars from a second kinematical component in addition to the dominant disk component. One of the largest and hottest high-dispersion patches is present in all age bins, and may be the signature of the end of the long bar.
  • We have analyzed new HST/ACS and HST/WFC3 imaging in F475W and F814W of two previously-unobserved fields along the M31 minor axis to confirm our previous constraints on the shape of M31's inner stellar halo. Both of these new datasets reach a depth of at least F814W$<$27 and clearly detect the blue horizontal branch (BHB) of the field as a distinct feature of the color-magnitude diagram. We measure the density of BHB stars and the ratio of BHB to red giant branch stars in each field using identical techniques to our previous work. We find excellent agreement with our previous measurement of a power-law for the 2-D projected surface density with an index of 2.6$^{+0.3}_{-0.2}$ outside of 3 kpc, which flattens to $\alpha <$1.2 inside of 3 kpc. Our findings confirm our previous suggestion that the field BHB stars in M31 are part of the halo population. However, the total halo profile is now known to differ from this BHB profile, which suggests that we have isolated the metal-poor component. This component appears to have an unbroken power-law profile from 3-150 kpc but accounts for only about half of the total halo stellar mass. Discrepancies between the BHB density profile and other measurements of the inner halo are therefore likely due to the different profile of the metal-rich halo component, which is not only steeper than the profile of the met al-poor component, but also has a larger core radius. These profile differences also help to explain the large ratio of BHB/RGB stars in our observations.
  • We construct a stellar cluster catalog for the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey using image classifications collected from the Andromeda Project citizen science website. We identify 2,753 clusters and 2,270 background galaxies within ~0.5 deg$^2$ of PHAT imaging searched, or ~400 kpc$^2$ in deprojected area at the distance of the Andromeda galaxy (M31). These identifications result from 1.82 million classifications of ~20,000 individual images (totaling ~7 gigapixels) by tens of thousands of volunteers. We show that our crowd-sourced approach, which collects >80 classifications per image, provides a robust, repeatable method of cluster identification. The high spatial resolution Hubble Space Telescope images resolve individual stars in each cluster and are instrumental in the factor of ~6 increase in the number of clusters known within the survey footprint. We measure integrated photometry in six filter passbands, ranging from the near-UV to the near-IR. PHAT clusters span a range of ~8 magnitudes in F475W (g-band) luminosity, equivalent to ~4 decades in cluster mass. We perform catalog completeness analysis using >3000 synthetic cluster simulations to determine robust detection limits and demonstrate that the catalog is 50% complete down to ~500 solar masses for ages <100 Myr. We include catalogs of clusters, background galaxies, remaining unselected candidates, and synthetic cluster simulations, making all information publicly available to the community. The catalog published here serves as the definitive base data product for PHAT cluster science, providing a census of star clusters in an L$^*$ spiral galaxy with unmatched sensitivity and quality.
  • We investigate the structure and nuclear region of the black hole (BH) hosting galaxy Henize2-10. Surface brightness (SB) profiles are analyzed using Magellan/Megacam $g$- and $r$-band images. Excluding the central starburst, we find a best-fit two component S\'ersic profile with $n_{\rm in} \sim 0.6$, $r_{\text{eff,in}} \sim$ 260~pc, and $n_{\rm out}\sim 1.8$, $r_{\text{eff, out}}\sim$ 1 kpc. Integrating out to our outer most data point (100 arc sec $\sim$ 4.3 kpc), we calculate $M_g=-19.2$ and $M_r=-19.8$. The corresponding enclosed stellar mass is $M_{\star}\sim(10\pm3)\times10^9$ M$_\odot$, $\sim3\times$ larger than previous estimates. Apart from the central $\lesssim$500 pc, with blue colors and an irregular morphology, the galaxy appears to be an early-type system. The outer color is quite red, $(g-r)_0=0.75$, suggesting a dominant old population. We study the nuclear region of the galaxy using archival Gemini/NIFS $K$-band adaptive optics spectroscopy and {\it Hubble Space Telescope} imaging. We place an upper limit on the BH mass of $\sim10^7M_{\odot}$ from the NIFS data, consistent with that from the $M_{\rm BH}$-radio-X-ray fundamental plane. No coronal lines are seen, but a Br$\gamma$ source is located at the position of the BH with a luminosity consistent with the X-ray emission. The starburst at the center of Henize 2-10 has led to the formation of several super star clusters, which are within $\sim$100 pc of the BH. We examine the fate of the nucleus by estimating the dynamical masses and dynamical friction timescales of the clusters. The most massive clusters ($\sim 10^6 M_\odot$) have $\tau_{\rm dyn} \lesssim 200$ Myr, and thus Henize 2-10 may represent a rare snapshot of nuclear star cluster formation around a pre-existing massive BH.
  • We present ages and masses for 601 star clusters in M31 from the analysis of the six filter integrated light measurements from near ultraviolet to near infrared wavelengths, made as part of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT). We derive the ages and masses using a probabilistic technique, which accounts for the effects of stochastic sampling of the stellar initial mass function. Tests on synthetic data show that this method, in conjunction with the exquisite sensitivity of the PHAT observations and their broad wavelength baseline, provides robust age and mass recovery for clusters ranging from $\sim 10^2 - 2 \times 10^6 M_\odot$. We find that the cluster age distribution is consistent with being uniform over the past $100$ Myr, which suggests a weak effect of cluster disruption within M31. The age distribution of older ($>100$ Myr) clusters fall towards old ages, consistent with a power-law decline of index $-1$, likely from a combination of fading and disruption of the clusters. We find that the mass distribution of the whole sample can be well-described by a single power-law with a spectral index of $-1.9 \pm 0.1$ over the range of $10^3-3 \times 10^5 M_\odot$. However, if we subdivide the sample by galactocentric radius, we find that the age distributions remain unchanged. However, the mass spectral index varies significantly, showing best fit values between $-2.2$ and $-1.8$, with the shallower slope in the highest star formation intensity regions. We explore the robustness of our study to potential systematics and conclude that the cluster mass function may vary with respect to environment.
  • We characterize the bulge, disk, and halo subcomponents in the Andromeda galaxy (M31) over the radial range 4 < R_proj < 225 kpc. The cospatial nature of these subcomponents renders them difficult to disentangle using surface brightness (SB) information alone, especially interior to ~20 kpc. Our new decomposition technique combines information from the luminosity function (LF) of over 1.5 million bright (20 < m_814W < 22) stars from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey, radial velocities of over 5000 red giant branch stars in the same magnitude range from the Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo (SPLASH) survey, and integrated I-band SB profiles from various sources. We use an affine-invariant Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to fit an appropriate toy model to these three data sets. The bulge, disk, and halo SB profiles are modeled as a Sersic, exponential, and cored power-law, respectively, and the LFs are modeled as broken power-laws. We present probability distributions for each of 32 parameters describing the SB profiles and LFs of the three subcomponents. We find that the number of stars with a disk-like LF is ~5% larger than the the number with disk-like (dynamically cold) kinematics, suggesting that some stars born in the disk have been dynamically heated to the point that they are kinematically indistinguishable from halo members. This is the first kinematical evidence for a "kicked-up disk" halo population in M31. The fraction of kicked-up disk stars is consistent with that found in simulations. We also find evidence for a radially varying disk LF, consistent with a negative metallicity gradient in the stellar disk.
  • The apparent age and mass of a stellar cluster can be strongly affected by stochastic sampling of the stellar initial mass function, when inferred from the integrated color of low mass clusters (less than ~10^4 solar masses). We use simulated star clusters to show that these effects are minimized when the brightest, rapidly evolving stars in a cluster can be resolved, and the light of the fainter, more numerous unresolved stars can be analyzed separately. When comparing the light from the less luminous cluster members to models of unresolved light, more accurate age estimates can be obtained than when analyzing the integrated light from the entire cluster under the assumption that the initial mass function is fully populated. We show the success of this technique first using simulated clusters, and then with a stellar cluster in M31. This method represents one way of accounting for the discrete, stochastic sampling of the stellar initial mass function in less massive clusters and can be leveraged in studies of clusters throughout the Local Group and other nearby galaxies.
  • We attempt to constrain the shape of M31's inner stellar halo by tracing the surface density of blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars at galactocentric distances ranging from 2 kpc to 35 kpc. Our measurements make use of resolved stellar photometry from a section of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey, supplemented by several archival Hubble Space Telescope observations. We find that the ratio of BHB to red giant stars is relatively constant outside of 10 kpc, suggesting that the BHB is as reliable a tracer of the halo population as the red giant branch. In the inner halo, we do not expect BHB stars to be produced by the high metallicity bulge and disk, making BHB stars a good candidate to be a reliable tracer of the stellar halo to much smaller galactocentric distances. If we assume a power-law profile r^(-\alpha) for the 2-D projected surface density BHB distribution, we obtain a high-quality fit with a 2-D power-law index of \alpha=2.6^{+0.3}_{-0.2} outside of 3 kpc, which flattens to \alpha<1.2 inside of 3 kpc. This slope is consistent with previous measurements but is anchored to a radial baseline that extends much farther inward. Finally, assuming azimuthal symmetry and a constant mass-to-light ratio, the best-fitting profile yields a total halo stellar mass of 2.1^{+1.7}_{-0.4} x 10^9 M_sun. These properties are comparable with both simulations of stellar halo formation formed by satellite disruption alone, and with simulations that include some in situ formation of halo stars.