• We report the detection of three small transiting planets around the young K3 dwarf K2-233 (2MASS J15215519-2013539) from observations during Campaign 15 of the K2 mission. The star is relatively nearby ($d$ = 69 pc) and bright ($V$ = 10.7 mag, $K_s$ = 8.4 mag), making the planetary system an attractive target for radial velocity follow-up and atmospheric characterization with the James Webb Space Telescope. The inner two planets are hot super-Earths ($R_b$ = 1.40 $\pm$ 0.06 R$_\oplus$, $R_c$ = 1.34 $\pm$ 0.08 R$_\oplus$), while the outer planet is a warm sub-Neptune ($R_d$ = 2.6 $\pm$ 0.1 R$_\oplus$). We estimate the stellar age to be 360$^{+490}_{-140}$ Myr based on rotation, activity, and kinematic indicators. The K2-233 system is particularly interesting given recent evidence for inflated radii in planets around similarly-aged stars, a trend potentially related to photo-evaporation, core-cooling, or both mechanisms.
  • The $K2$ Mission has photometrically monitored thousands of stars at high precision and cadence in a series of $\sim$80-day campaigns focused on sections of the ecliptic plane. During its second campaign, $K2$ targeted over 1000 young stellar objects (YSOs) in the $\sim$1-3 Myr $\rho$ Ophiuchus and 5-10 Myr Upper Scorpius regions. From this set, we have carefully vetted photometry from {\em WISE} and {\em Spitzer} to identify those YSOs with infrared excess indicative of primordial circumstellar disks. We present here the resulting comprehensive sample of 288 young disk-bearing stars from B through M spectral types and analysis of their associated $K2$ light curves. Using statistics of periodicity and symmetry, we categorize each light curves into eight different variability classes, notably including "dippers" (fading events), "bursters" (brightening events), stochastic, and quasi-periodic types. Nearly all (96\%) of disk-bearing YSOs are identified as variable at 30-minute cadence with the sub-1\% precision of {\em K2}. Combining our variability classifications with (circum)stellar properties, we find that the bursters, stochastic sources, and the largest amplitude quasi-periodic stars have larger infrared colors, and hence stronger circumstellar disks. They also tend to have larger H$\alpha$ equivalent widths, indicative of higher accretion rates. The dippers, on the other hand, cluster toward moderate infrared colors and low H$\alpha$. Using resolved disk observations, we further find that the latter favor high inclinations, apart from a few notable exceptions with close to face-on disks. These observations support the idea that YSO time domain properties are dependent on several factors including accretion rate and view angle.
  • We describe the release of a new High Level Science Product (HLSP) available at the MAST archive. The HLSP, called K2Superstamp, consists of a series of FITS images for four open star clusters observed by the K2 Mission using so-called "superstamp" pixel masks: M35, the $\sim$150 Myr old open cluster observed during K2 Campaign 0, M67, the solar-age, solar-metallicity benchmark cluster observed during Campaign 5, Ruprecht 147, the $\sim$3 Gyr-old open cluster observed during Campaign 7, and the Lagoon Nebula (M8/NGC 6530), the high-mass star-forming region observed during Campaign 9. While the data for these regions have long been served on MAST, until now they were only available as a disconnected set of smaller Target Pixel Files (TPFs) because the spacecraft stored these observations in small chunks. As a result, these regions have hitherto been ignored by many lightcurve and planet search pipelines. With this new release, we have stitched these TPFs together into spatially contiguous FITS images (one per cadence) to make their scientific analysis easier. In addition, each image has been fit with an accurate WCS solution so that you may locate any object of interest via its right ascension and declination. We describe here the process of stitching and astrometric calibration.
  • The role of stellar age in the measured properties and occurrence rates of exoplanets is not well understood. This is in part due to a paucity of young planets and the uncertainties in age-dating for most exoplanet host stars. Exoplanets belonging to coeval stellar populations, young or old, are particularly useful as benchmarks for studies aiming to constrain the evolutionary timescales relevant for planets. Such timescales may concern orbital migration, gravitational contraction, or atmospheric photo-evaporation, among other mechanisms. Here we report the serendipitous discovery of a transiting sub-Neptune from K2 photometry of the low-mass star EPIC 247267267. From multiple age indicators we estimate the age of the star to be in the range of 50-500 Myr at 68% confidence. However, based on its kinematics, we propose the star belongs to the Cas-Tau association, which we suggest has an age of 46 $\pm$ 8 Myr. Our newly derived age estimate for the association is based on a color-magnitude diagram analysis of high-probability members near the main sequence turnoff. The size of EPIC 247267267 b ($R_P = 3.0 \pm 0.5 R_\oplus$) combined with its youth make it an intriguing case study for photo-evaporation models, which predict enhanced atmospheric mass loss during early evolutionary stages.
  • In a previous paper, using data from K2 Campaign 2, we identified 11 very low mass members of the $\rho$ Oph and Upper Scorpius star-forming region as having periodic photometric variability and phased light curves showing multiple scallops or undulations. All the stars with the "scallop-shell" light curve morphology are mid-to-late M dwarfs without evidence of active accretion, and with photometric periods generally $<$1 day. Their phased light curves have too much structure to be attributed to non-axisymmetrically distributed photospheric spots and rotational modulation. We have now identified an additional eight probable members of the same star-forming region plus three stars in the Taurus star-forming region with this same light curve morphology and sharing the same period and spectral type range as the previous group. We describe the light curves of these new stars in detail and present their general physical characteristics. We also examine the properties of the overall set of stars in order to identify common features that might help elucidate the causes of their photometric variability.
  • One of the most well-studied young stellar associations, Taurus-Auriga, will be observed by the extended Kepler mission, K2, in the spring of 2017. K2 Campaign 13 (C13) will be a unique opportunity to study many stars in this young association at high photometric precision and cadence. Using observations from the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) survey, we identify "dippers", stochastic variables, and periodic variables among K2 C13 target stars. This release of the KELT data (lightcurve data in e-tables) provides the community with long-time baseline observations to assist in the understanding of the more exotic variables in the association. Transient-like phenomena on timescales of months to years are known characteristics in the light curves of young stellar objects, making contextual pre- and post-K2 observations critical to understanding their underlying processes. We are providing a comprehensive set of the KELT light curves for known Taurus-Auriga stars in K2 C13. The combined data sets from K2 and KELT should permit a broad array of investigations related to star formation, stellar variability, and protoplanetary environments.
  • We present the discovery of four low-mass ($M<0.6$ $M_\odot$) eclipsing binary (EB) systems in the sub-Gyr old Praesepe open cluster using Kepler/K2 time-series photometry and Keck/HIRES spectroscopy. We present a new Gaussian process eclipsing binary model, GP-EBOP, as well as a method of simultaneously determining effective temperatures and distances for EBs. Three of the reported systems (AD 3814, AD 2615 and AD 1508) are detached and double-lined, and precise solutions are presented for the first two. We determine masses and radii to 1-3% precision for AD 3814 and to 5-6% for AD 2615. Together with effective temperatures determined to $\sim$50 K precision, we test the PARSEC v1.2 and BHAC15 stellar evolution models. Our EB parameters are more consistent with the PARSEC models, primarily because the BHAC15 temperature scale is hotter than our data over the mid M-dwarf mass range probed. Both ADs 3814 and 2615, which have orbital periods of 6.0 and 11.6 days, are circularized but not synchronized. This suggests that either synchronization proceeds more slowly in fully convective stars than the theory of equilibrium tides predicts or magnetic braking is currently playing a more important role than tidal forces in the spin evolution of these binaries. The fourth system (AD 3116) comprises a brown dwarf transiting a mid M-dwarf, which is the first such system discovered in a sub-Gyr open cluster. Finally, these new discoveries increase the number of characterized EBs in sub-Gyr open clusters by 20% (40%) below $M<1.5$ $M_{\odot}$ ($M<0.6$ $M_{\odot}$).
  • We report the discovery of a repeating photometric signal from a low-mass member of the Praesepe open cluster that we interpret as a Neptune-sized transiting planet. The star is JS 183 (HSHJ 163, EPIC 211916756) with $T_{\rm eff} = 3325\pm100$ K, $M_{*} = 0.44\pm0.04$ $M_{\odot}$, $R_{*} = 0.44\pm0.03$ $R_{\odot}$, and $\log{g_*} = 4.82\pm0.06$. The planet has an orbital period of 10.134588 days and a radius of $R_{P}= 0.32\pm0.02$ $R_J$. Since the star is faint at $V=16.5$ and $J=13.3$, we are unable to obtain a measured radial-velocity orbit, but we can constrain the companion mass to below about 1.7 $M_J$, and thus well below the planetary boundary. JS 183b (since designated as K2-95b) is the second transiting planet found with ${\it K2}$ that resides in a several hundred Myr open cluster; both planets orbit mid-M dwarf stars and are approximately Neptune-sized. With a well-determined stellar density from the planetary transit, and with an independently known metallicity from its cluster membership, JS 183 provides a particularly valuable test of stellar models at the fully convective boundary. We find that JS 183 is the lowest-density transit host known at the fully convective boundary, and that its very low density is consistent with current models of stars just above the fully convective boundary but in tension with the models just below the fully convective boundary.
  • Using K2 data, we have identified 23 very low mass members of the $\rho$ Oph and Upper Scorpius star-forming region as having periodic photometric variability not easily explained by well-established physical mechanisms such as star spots, eclipsing binaries, or pulsation. All of these unusual stars are mid-to-late M dwarfs without evidence of active accretion, and with photometric periods generally $<$1 day. Often the unusual light curve signature takes the form of narrow flux dips; when we also have rotation periods from star spots, the two periods agree, suggesting that the flux dips are due to material orbiting the star at the Keplerian co-rotation radius. We sometimes see "state-changes" in the phased light curve morphologies where $\sim$25% of the waveform changes shape on timescales less than a day; often, the "state-change" takes place immediately after a strong flare. For the group of stars with these sudden light curve morphology shifts, we attribute their flux dips as most probably arising from eclipses of warm coronal gas clouds, analogous to the sling-shot prominences postulated to explain transient H$\alpha$ absorption features in AB Doradus itself and other rapidly rotating late type stars. For another group of stars with somewhat longer periods, we find the short duration flux dips to be highly variable on both short and long timescales, with generally asymmetric flux dip profiles. We believe that these flux dips are due to particulate clouds possibly associated with a close-in planet or resulting from a recent collisional event.
  • We present an ongoing, systematic search for extragalactic infrared transients, dubbed SPIRITS --- SPitzer InfraRed Intensive Transients Survey. In the first year, using Spitzer/IRAC, we searched 190 nearby galaxies with cadence baselines of one month and six months. We discovered over 1958 variables and 43 transients. Here, we describe the survey design and highlight 14 unusual infrared transients with no optical counterparts to deep limits, which we refer to as SPRITEs (eSPecially Red Intermediate Luminosity Transient Events). SPRITEs are in the infrared luminosity gap between novae and supernovae, with [4.5] absolute magnitudes between -11 and -14 (Vega-mag) and [3.6]-[4.5] colors between 0.3 mag and 1.6 mag. The photometric evolution of SPRITEs is diverse, ranging from < 0.1 mag/yr to > 7 mag/yr. SPRITEs occur in star-forming galaxies. We present an in-depth study of one of them, SPIRITS 14ajc in Messier 83, which shows shock-excited molecular hydrogen emission. This shock may have been triggered by the dynamic decay of a non-hierarchical system of massive stars that led to either the formation of a binary or a proto-stellar merger.
  • We present 29 likely members of the young $\rho$ Oph or Upper Sco regions of recent star formation that exhibit "accretion burst" type light curves in $K2$ time series photometry. The bursters were identified by visual examination of their ~80 day light curves, though all satisfy the $M < -0.25$ flux asymmetry criterion for burst behavior defined by Cody et al. (2014). The burst sources represent $\approx$9% of cluster members with strong infrared excess indicative of circumstellar material. Higher amplitude burster behavior is correlated with larger inner disk infrared excesses, as inferred from $WISE$ $W1-W2$ color. The burst sources are also outliers in their large H$\alpha$ emission equivalent widths. No distinction between bursters and non-bursters is seen in stellar properties such as multiplicity or spectral type. The frequency of bursters is similar between the younger, more compact $\rho$ Oph region, and the older, more dispersed Upper Sco region. The bursts exhibit a range of shapes, amplitudes (~10-700%), durations (~1-10 days), repeat time scales (~3-80 days), and duty cycles (~10-100%). Our results provide important input to models of magnetospheric accretion, in particular by elucidating the properties of accretion-related variability in the low state between major longer duration events such as EX Lup and FU Ori type accretion outbursts. We demonstrate the broad continuum of accretion burst behavior in young stars -- extending the phenomenon to lower amplitudes and shorter timescales than traditionally considered in the theory of pre-main sequence accretion history.
  • We find transient, transit-like dimming events within the K2 time series photometry of the young star RIK-210 in the Upper Scorpius OB association. These dimming events are variable in depth, duration, and morphology. High spatial resolution imaging revealed the star is single, and radial velocity monitoring indicated that the dimming events can not be due to an eclipsing stellar or brown dwarf companion. Archival and follow-up photometry suggest the dimming events are transient in nature. The variable morphology of the dimming events suggests they are not due to a single, spherical body. The ingress of each dimming event is always shallower than egress, as one would expect for an orbiting body with a leading tail. The dimming events are periodic and synchronous with the stellar rotation. However, we argue it is unlikely the dimming events could be attributed to anything on the stellar surface based on the observed depths and durations. Variable obscuration by a protoplanetary disk is unlikely on the basis that the star is not actively accreting and lacks the infrared excess associated with an inner disk. Rather, we explore the possibilities that the dimming events are due to magnetospheric clouds, a transiting protoplanet surrounded by circumplanetary dust and debris, eccentric orbiting bodies undergoing periodic tidal disruption, or an extended field of dust or debris near the corotation radius.
  • CoRoT 223992193 is the only known low-mass, pre-main sequence eclipsing binary that shows evidence of a circumbinary disk. The system displays complex photometric and spectroscopic variability over a range of timescales and wavelengths. Using two optical CoRoT runs, and infrared Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 $\mu$m observations (simultaneous with the second CoRoT run), we model the out-of-eclipse light curves. The large scale structure in both CoRoT light curves is consistent with the constructive and destructive interference of starspot signals at two slightly different periods. Using the stellar $v\sin i$ 's, we infer different rotation periods: the primary is consistent with synchronisation and the secondary is slightly supersynchronous. Comparison of the raw data to the residuals of our spot model in colour-magnitude space indicates additional contributions consistent with variable dust emission and obscuration. We also identify short-duration flux dips preceding secondary eclipse in all three CoRoT and Spitzer bands. We construct a model of the inner regions of the binary and propose that these dips could be caused by partial occultation of the central binary by the accretion stream onto the primary star. Analysis of 15 VLT/FLAMES H$\alpha$ profiles reveal an emission profile associated with each star: the majority is consistent with chromospheric emission but higher velocity emission is also seen, which could be due to prominences or accretion-related phenomena. In addition, simultaneous u and r-band observations from CFHT/MEGACam reveal a short-lived u-band excess consistent with either an accretion hot spot or stellar flare. The photometric and spectroscopic variations are complex but are consistent with the picture of two active stars possibly undergoing non-steady, low-level accretion; the system's very high inclination provides a new view of such variability. [Abridged]
  • SPIRITS---SPitzer InfraRed Intensive Transients Survey---is an ongoing survey of nearby galaxies searching for infrared (IR) transients with Spitzer/IRAC. We present the discovery and follow-up observations of one of our most luminous ($M_{[4.5]} = -17.1\pm0.4$ mag, Vega) and red ($[3.6] - [4.5] = 3.0 \pm 0.2$ mag) transients, SPIRITS 15c. The transient was detected in a dusty spiral arm of IC 2163 ($D\approx35.5$ Mpc). Pre-discovery ground-based imaging revealed an associated, shorter-duration transient in the optical and near-IR (NIR). NIR spectroscopy showed a broad ($\approx 8400$ km s$^{-1}$), double-peaked emission line of He I at $1.083 \mu$m, indicating an explosive origin. The NIR spectrum of SPIRITS 15c is similar to that of the Type IIb SN 2011dh at a phase of $\approx 200$ days. Assuming $A_V = 2.2$ mag of extinction in SPIRITS 15c provides a good match between their optical light curves. The IR light curves and the extreme $[3.6]-[4.5]$ color cannot be explained using only a standard extinction law. Another luminous ($M_{4.5} = -16.1\pm0.4$ mag) event, SPIRITS 14buu, was serendipitously discovered in the same galaxy. The source displays an optical plateau lasting $\gtrsim 80$ days, and we suggest a scenario similar to the low-luminosity Type IIP SN 2005cs obscured by $A_V \approx 1.5$ mag. Other classes of IR-luminous transients can likely be ruled out in both cases. If both events are indeed SNe, this may suggest $\gtrsim 18\%$ of nearby core-collapse SNe are missed by currently operating optical surveys.
  • Theories of the formation and early evolution of planetary systems postulate that planets are born in circumstellar disks, and undergo radial migration during and after dissipation of the dust and gas disk from which they formed. The precise ages of meteorites indicate that planetesimals - the building blocks of planets - are produced within the first million years of a star's life. A prominent question is: how early can one find fully formed planets like those frequently detected on short orbital periods around mature stars? Some theories suggest the in situ formation of planets close to their host stars is unlikely and the existence of such planets is evidence for large scale migration. Other theories posit that planet assembly at small orbital separations may be common. Here we report on a newly-born, transiting planet orbiting its star every 5.4 days. The planet is 50 per cent larger than Neptune, and its mass is less than 3.6 times Jupiter (at 99.7 per cent confidence), with a true mass likely to be within a factor of several of Neptune's. The 5-10 million year old star has a tenuous dust disk extending outwards from about 2 times the Earth-Sun separation, in addition to the large planet located at less than one-twentieth the Earth-Sun separation.
  • We present multi-epoch mid-infrared (IR) photometry and the optical discovery observations of the "impostor" supernova (SN) 2010da in NGC 300 using new and archival Spitzer Space Telescope images and ground-based observatories. The mid-IR counterpart of SN 2010da was detected as SPIRITS 14bme in the SPitzer InfraRed Intensive Transient Survey (SPIRITS), an ongoing systematic search for IR transients. A sharp increase in the 3.6 $\mu$m flux followed by a rapid decrease measured ~150 d before and ~80 d after the initial outburst, respectively, reveal a mid-IR counterpart to the coincident optical and high luminosity X-ray outbursts. At late times after the outburst (~2000 d), the 3.6 and 4.5 $\mu$m emission increased to over a factor of 2 times the progenitor flux. We attribute the re-brightening mid-IR emission to continued dust production and increasing luminosity of the surviving system associated with SN 2010da. We analyze the evolution of the dust temperature, mass, luminosity, and equilibrium temperature radius in order to resolve the nature of SN 2010da. We address the leading interpretation of SN 2010da as an eruption from a luminous blue variable (LBV) high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) system. We propose that SN 2010da is instead a supergiant (sg)B[e]-HMXB based on similar luminosities and dust masses exhibited by two other known sgB[e]-HMXB systems. Additionally, the SN 2010da progenitor occupies a similar region on a mid-IR color-magnitude diagram (CMD) with known sgB[e] stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The lower limit estimated for the orbital eccentricity of the sgB[e]-HMXB (e>0.82) from X-ray luminosity measurements is high compared to known sgHMXBs and supports the claim that SN 2010da may be associated with a newly formed HMXB system.
  • Theoretical models and spectroscopic observations of newborn stars suggest that protoplantary disks have an inner "wall" at a distance set by the disk interaction with the star. Around T Tauri stars, the size of this disk hole is expected to be on a 0.1-AU scale that is unresolved by current adaptive optics imaging, though some model-dependent constraints have been obtained by near-infrared interferometry. Here we report the first measurement of the inner disk wall around a solar-mass young stellar object, YLW 16B in the {\rho} Ophiuchi star-forming region, by detecting the light travel time of the variable radiation from the stellar surface to the disk. Consistent time lags were detected on two nights, when the time series in H (1.6 {\mu}m) and K (2.2 {\mu}m) bands were synchronized while the 4.5 {\mu}m emission lagged by 74.5 +/- 3.2 seconds. Considering the nearly edge-on geometry of the disk, the inner rim should be 0.084 AU from the protostar on average, with an error of order 0.01 AU. This size is likely larger than the range of magnetospheric truncations, and consistent with an optically and geometrically thick disk front at the dust sublimation radius at ~1500 K. The widths of the cross-correlation functions between the data in different wavebands place possible new constraints on the geometry of the disk.
  • We present the discovery in Kepler's $K2$ mission observations and our follow-up radial velocity observations from Keck/HIRES for four eclipsing binary (EB) star systems in the young benchmark Pleiades cluster. Based on our modeling results, we announce two new low mass ($M_{tot} < 0.6 M_\odot$) EBs among Pleiades members (HCG 76 and MHO 9) and we report on two previously known Pleiades binaries that are also found to be EB systems (HII 2407 and HD 23642). We measured the masses of the binary HCG 76 to $\lesssim$2.5% precision, and the radii to $\lesssim$4.5% precision, which together with the precise effective temperatures yield an independent Pleiades distance of 132$\pm$5 pc. We discuss another EB towards the Pleiades that is a possible but unlikely Pleiades cluster member (AK II 465). The two new confirmed Pleiades systems extend the mass range of Pleiades EB components to 0.2-2 $M_\odot$. Our initial measurements of the fundamental stellar parameters for the Pleiades EBs are discussed in the context of the current stellar models and the nominal cluster isochrone, finding good agreement with the stellar models of Baraffe et al. (2015) at the nominal Pleiades age of 120 Myr. Finally, in the Hyades, we report a new low mass eclipsing system (vA 50) that was concurrently discovered and studied by Mann et al. (2016). We confirm that the eclipse is likely caused by a Neptune-sized transiting planet, and with the additional radial velocity constraints presented here we improve the constraint on the maximum mass of the planet to be $\lesssim$1.2 $M_\mathrm{Jup}$.
  • We examine the light and color evolution of the T Tauri binary KH 15D through photometry obtained at wavelengths between 0.55 and 8.0 $\mu$m. The data were collected with ANDICAM on the 1.3 m SMARTS telescope at Cerro-Tololo Inter-American Observatory and with IRAC on the Spitzer Space Telescope. We show that the system's circumbinary ring, which acts as a screen that covers and uncovers different portions of the binary orbit as the ring precesses, has reached an orientation where the brighter component (star B) fully or nearly fully emerges during each orbital cycle. The fainter component (star A) remains fully occulted by the screen at all phases. The leading and trailing edges of the screen move across the sky at the same rate of $\sim$15 meters per second, consistent with expectation for a ring with a radius and width of $\sim$4 AU and a precession period of $\sim$6500 years. Light and color variations continue to indicate that the screen is sharp edged and opaque at \emph{VRIJH} wavelengths. However, we find an increasing transparency of the ring edge at 2.2, 3.6, and 4.5 $\mu$m. Reddening seen at the beginning of the eclipse that occurred during the CSI 2264 campaign particularly suggests selective extinction by a population of large dust grains. Meanwhile, the gradual bluing observed while star B is setting is indicative of forward scattering effects at the edge of the ring. The SED of the system at its bright phase shows no evidence of infrared excess emission that can be attributed to radiation from the ring or other dust component out to 8 microns.
  • Our goal is to relate the photometric and spectroscopic variability of classical T Tauri stars, of the star-forming cluster NGC 2264, to the physical processes acting in the stellar and circumstellar environment, within a few stellar radii from the star. NGC 2264 was the target of a multiwavelength observational campaign with CoRoT, MOST, Spitzer, and Chandra satellites and observations from the ground. We classified the CoRoT light curves of accreting systems according to their morphology and compared our classification to several accretion diagnostics and disk parameters. The morphology of the CoRoT light curve reflects the evolution of the accretion process and of the inner disk region. Accretion burst stars present high mass-accretion rates and optically thick inner disks. AA Tau-like systems, whose light curves are dominated by circumstellar dust obscuration, show intermediate mass-accretion rates and are located in the transition of thick to anemic disks. Classical T Tauri stars with spot-like light curves correspond mostly to systems with a low mass-accretion rate and low mid-IR excess. About 30% of the classical T Tauri stars observed in the 2008 and 2011 CoRoT runs changed their light-curve morphology. Transitions from AA Tau-like and spot-like to aperiodic light curves and vice versa were common. The analysis of the $H\alpha$ emission line variability of 58 accreting stars showed that 8 presented a periodicity that in a few cases was coincident with the photometric period. The blue and red wings of the $H\alpha$ line profiles often do not correlate with each other, indicating that they are strongly influenced by different physical processes. Accreting stars have a dynamic stellar and circumstellar environment that can be explained by magnetospheric accretion and outflow models, including variations from stable to unstable accretion regimes on timescales of a few years
  • We present a systematic study of mid-infrared (mid-IR) emission from 141 nearby supernovae (SNe) observed with the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) on Spitzer.These SNe reside in one of the 190 galaxies within 20 Mpc drawn from the ongoing SPIRITS program. We detect 8 Type Ia SNe and 36 core-collapse SNe. All Type I SNe become undetectable within 3 years of explosion. About 22$\pm$11% of Type II SNe continue to be detected at late-times. Dust luminosity, temperature, and a lower liit on mass are obtained by fitting the SED using photometry with IRAC bands 1 and 2. The mass estimate does not distinguish between pre-existing and newly produced dust. We observe warm dust masses between $10^{-2}$ and $10^{-6}$ $\rm M_{\odot}$ and dust temperatures from 200 K to 1280 K.We present detailed case studies of two extreme Type II-P SNe: SN 2011ja and 2014bi. SN 2011ja was over-luminous ([4.5] = -15.6 mag) at 900 days post-explosion accompanied by the growing dust mass. This suggests either an episode of dust formation or an intensifying CSM interactions heating up pre-existing dust. SN 2014bi showed a factor of 10 decrease in dust mass over one month suggesting either an episode of dust destruction or a fading source of dust heating. A rebrightening of the Type Ib SN 2014C is observed and attributed to CSM interactions. This observation adds to a small number of stripped-envelope SNe that have mid-IR excess. The observations suggest that the CSM shell around SN 2014C is originated from an LBV-like eruption roughly 100 years before the explosion. We also report detections of SN1974E, 1979C, 1980K, 1986J, and 1993J detected more than 20 years post-explosion. The number of outlying SNe identified in this work demonstrates the power of late time mid-IR observations of a large sample of SNe to identify events with unusual evolution.
  • We provide CoRoT and Spitzer light curves, as well as broad-band multi-wavelength photometry and high resolution, multi- and single-epoch spectroscopy for 17 classical T Tauris in NGC 2264 whose CoRoT light curves (LCs) exemplify the "stochastic" LC class as defined in Cody et al. (2014). The most probable physical mechanism to explain the optical variability in this LC class is time-dependent mass accretion onto the stellar photosphere, producing transient hot spots. As evidence in favor of this hypothesis, multi-epoch high resolution spectra for a subset of these stars shows that their veiling levels also vary in time and that this veiling variability is consistent in both amplitude and timescale with the optical LC morphology. Furthermore, the veiling variability is well-correlated with the strength of the HeI 6678A emission line, a feature predicted by models to arise in accretion shocks on or near the stellar photosphere. Stars with accretion burst LC morphology (Stauffer et al. 2014) are also attributed to variable mass accretion. Both the stochastic and accretion burst LCs can be explained by a simple model of randomly occurring flux bursts, with the stochastic LC class having a higher frequency of lower amplitude events. Based on their UV excesses, veiling, and mean Ha equivalent widths, members of the stochastic LC class have only moderate time-averaged mass accretion rates. The most common feature of their Ha profiles is for them to exhibit blue-shifted absorption features, most likely originating in a disk wind. The lack of periodic signatures in the LCs suggests that little of the variability is due to long-lived hot spots rotating into or out of our line of sight; instead, the primary driver of the observed photometric variability is likely to be instabilities in the inner disk that lead to variable mass accretion.
  • We report the discovery of three low-mass double-lined eclipsing binaries in the pre-main sequence Upper Scorpius association, revealed by $K2$ photometric monitoring of the region over $\sim$ 78 days. The orbital periods of all three systems are $<$5 days. We use the $K2$ photometry plus multiple Keck/HIRES radial velocities and spectroscopic flux ratios to determine fundamental stellar parameters for both the primary and secondary components of each system, along with the orbital parameters. We present tentative evidence that EPIC 203868608 is a hierarchical triple system comprised of an eclipsing pair of $\sim$25 $M_\mathrm{Jup}$ brown dwarfs with a wide M-type companion. If confirmed, it would constitute only the second double-lined eclipsing brown dwarf binary system discovered to date. The double-lined system EPIC 203710387 is composed of nearly identical M4.5-M5 stars with fundamentally determined masses and radii measured to better than 3% precision ($M_1=0.1183\pm0.0028 M_\odot$, $M_2=0.1076\pm0.0031 M_\odot$ and $R_1=0.417\pm0.010 R_\odot$, $R_2=0.450\pm0.012 R_\odot$) from combination of the light curve and radial velocity time series. These stars have the lowest masses of any stellar mass double-lined eclipsing binary to date. Finally, EPIC 203476597 is a compact single-lined system with a G8-KO primary and a likely mid-K secondary whose line are revealed in spectral ratios. Continued measurement of radial velocities and spectroscopic flux ratios will better constrain fundamental parameters and should elevate the objects to benchmark status. We also present revised parameters for the double-lined eclipsing binary UScoCTIO 5 ($M_1=0.3336\pm0.0022 M_\odot$, $M_2=0.3200\pm0.0022 M_\odot$ and $R_1=0.862\pm0.012$, $R_2=0.852\pm0.013 R_\odot$). We discuss the implications of our results on these $\sim$0.1-1.5 $M_\odot$ stars for pre-main-sequence evolutionary models.
  • The star HII 2407 is a member of the relatively young Pleiades star cluster and was previously discovered to be a single-lined spectroscopic binary. It is newly identified here within $Kepler$/$K2$ photometric time series data as an eclipsing binary system. Mutual fitting of the radial velocity and photometric data leads to an orbital solution and constraints on fundamental stellar parameters. While the primary has arrived on the main sequence, the secondary is still pre-main-sequence and we compare our results for the $M/M_\odot$ and $R/R_\odot$ values with stellar evolutionary models. We also demonstrate that the system is likely to be tidally synchronized. Follow-up infrared spectroscopy is likely to reveal the lines of the secondary, allowing for dynamically measured masses and elevating the system to benchmark eclipsing binary status.
  • We explore UV and optical variability signatures for several hundred members of NGC 2264 (3 Myr). We performed simultaneous u- and r-band monitoring over two full weeks with CFHT/MegaCam. About 750 young stars are probed; 40% of them are accreting. Statistically distinct variability properties are observed for accreting and non-accreting cluster members. The accretors exhibit a significantly higher level of variability than the non-accretors, especially in the UV. The amount of u-band variability correlates statistically with UV excess in disk-bearing objects, which suggests that accretion and star-disk interaction are the main sources of variability. Cool magnetic spots, several hundred degrees colder than the photosphere and covering from 5 to 30% of the stellar surface, appear to be the leading factor of variability for the non-accreting stars. In contrast, accretion spots, a few thousand degrees hotter than the photosphere and covering a few percent of the stellar surface, best reproduce the variability of accreting objects. The color behavior is also found to be different between accreting and non-accreting stars. Typical variability amplitudes for accreting members rapidly increase from r to u, which indicates a much stronger contrast at short wavelengths; a lower color dependence in the amplitudes is instead measured for diskless stars. We find that u-band variability on hour timescales is typically about 10% of the peak-to-peak variability on day timescales, while longer term (years) variability is consistent with amplitudes measured over weeks. We conclude that for both accreting and non-accreting stars, the mid-term rotational modulation by spots is the leading timescale for a variability of up to several years. In turn, this suggests that the accretion process is essentially stable over years, although it exhibits low-level shorter term variations in single accretion events.