• After briefly reviewing the results about polytropic stars in Palatini f(R)-theories, we first show how these results rely on the assumption of a regular function f(R). In particular, singular models allow to extend the parameter interval in which no singularity is formed. Furthermore, we present how the conformal metric can be matched smoothly in the cases where the original metric generates a singularity. In fact, the singularity comes from a singular conformal factor which is continuous though not differentiable at the stellar surface. This suggests that the correct metric to be considered as physical is the conformal metric. This is relevant because, even also when matching the original metric is possible, the use of the conformal metric generates different stellar models.
  • We investigate whether the large scale structure environment of galaxy clusters imprints a selection bias on Sunyaev Zel'dovich (SZ) catalogs. Such a selection effect might be caused by line of sight (LoS) structures that add to the SZ signal or contain point sources that disturb the signal extraction in the SZ survey. We use the Planck PSZ1 union catalog (Planck Collab- oration et al. 2013a) in the SDSS region as our sample of SZ selected clusters. We calculate the angular two-point correlation function (2pcf) for physically correlated, foreground and background structure in the RedMaPPer SDSS DR8 catalog with respect to each cluster. We compare our results with an optically selected comparison cluster sample and with theoretical predictions. In contrast to the hypothesis of no environment-based selection, we find a mean 2pcf for background structures of -0.049 on scales of $\lesssim 40'$, significantly non-zero at $\sim 4 \sigma$, which means that Planck clusters are more likely to be detected in regions of low background density. We hypothesize this effect arises either from background estimation in the SZ survey or from radio sources in the background. We estimate the defect in SZ signal caused by this effect to be negligibly small, of the order of $\sim 10^{-4}$ of the signal of a typical Planck detection. Analogously, there are no implications on X-ray mass measurements. However, the environ- mental dependence has important consequences for weak lensing follow up of Planck galaxy clusters: we predict that projection effects account for half of the mass contained within a 15' radius of Planck galaxy clusters. We did not detect a background underdensity of CMASS LRGs, which also leaves a spatially varying redshift dependence of the Planck SZ selection function as a possible cause for our findings.
  • We present the clustering of galaxy clusters as a useful addition to the common set of cosmological observables. The clustering of clusters probes the large-scale structure of the Universe, extending galaxy clustering analysis to the high-peak, high-bias regime. Clustering of galaxy clusters complements the traditional cluster number counts and observable-mass relation analyses, significantly improving their constraining power by breaking existing calibration degeneracies. We use the maxBCG galaxy clusters catalogue to constrain cosmological parameters and cross-calibrate the mass-observable relation, using cluster abundances in richness bins and weak-lensing mass estimates. We then add the redshift-space power spectrum of the sample, including an effective modelling of the weakly non-linear contribution and allowing for an arbitrary photometric redshift smoothing. The inclusion of the power spectrum data allows for an improved self-calibration of the scaling relation. We find that the inclusion of the power spectrum typically brings a $\sim 50$ per cent improvement in the errors on the fluctuation amplitude $\sigma_8$ and the matter density $\Omega_{\mathrm{m}}$. Finally, we apply this method to constrain models of the early universe through the amount of primordial non-Gaussianity of the local type, using both the variation in the halo mass function and the variation in the cluster bias. We find a constraint on the amount of skewness $f_{\mathrm{NL}} = 12 \pm 157 $ ($1\sigma$) from the cluster data alone.