• In this contribution I provide a brief summary of the contents of Gaia DR1. This is followed by a discussion of studies in the literature that attempt to characterize the quality of the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution parallaxes in Gaia DR1, and I point out a misconception about the handling of the known systematic errors in the Gaia DR1 parallaxes. I highlight some of the more unexpected uses of the Gaia DR1 data and close with a look ahead at the next Gaia data releases, with Gaia DR2 coming up in April 2018.
  • Double white dwarf (DWD) binaries are expected to be very common in the Milky Way, but their intrinsic faintness challenges the detection of these systems. Currently, only a few tens of detached DWDs are know. Such systems offer the best chance of extracting the physical properties that would allow us to address a wealth of outstanding questions ranging from the nature of white dwarfs, over stellar and binary evolution to mapping the Galaxy. In this paper we explore the prospects for detections of ultra-compact (with binary separations of a few solar radii or less) detached DWDs in: 1) optical radiation with Gaia and the LSST and 2) gravitational wave radiation with LISA. We show that Gaia, LSST and LISA have the potential to detect respectively around a few hundreds, a thousand, and 25 thousand DWD systems. Moreover, Gaia and LSST data will extend by respectively a factor of two and seven the guaranteed sample of binaries detected in electromagnetic and gravitational wave radiation, opening the era of multi-messenger astronomy for these sources.
  • In this contribution I provide an overview of the the European Space Agency's Gaia mission just ahead of its launch scheduled for November 2013.
  • (abridged) A complete census of planetary systems around a volume-limited sample of solar-type stars (FGK dwarfs) in the Solar neighborhood with uniform sensitivity down to Earth-mass planets within their Habitable Zones out to several AUs would be a major milestone in extrasolar planets astrophysics. This fundamental goal can be achieved with a mission concept such as NEAT - the Nearby Earth Astrometric Telescope. NEAT is designed to carry out space-borne extremely-high-precision astrometric measurements sufficient to detect dynamical effects due to orbiting planets of mass even lower than Earth's around the nearest stars. Such a survey mission would provide the actual planetary masses and the full orbital geometry for all the components of the detected planetary systems down to the Earth-mass limit. The NEAT performance limits can be achieved by carrying out differential astrometry between the targets and a set of suitable reference stars in the field. The NEAT instrument design consists of an off-axis parabola single-mirror telescope, a detector with a large field of view made of small movable CCDs located around a fixed central CCD, and an interferometric calibration system originating from metrology fibers located at the primary mirror. The proposed mission architecture relies on the use of two satellites operating at L2 for 5 years, flying in formation and offering a capability of more than 20,000 reconfigurations (alternative option uses deployable boom). The NEAT primary science program will encompass an astrometric survey of our 200 closest F-, G- and K-type stellar neighbors, with an average of 50 visits. The remaining time might be allocated to improve the characterization of the architecture of selected planetary systems around nearby targets of specific interest (low-mass stars, young stars, etc.) discovered by Gaia, ground-based high-precision radial-velocity surveys.
  • ELSA stands for the ambitious goal of `European Leadership in Space Astrometry'. In this closing contribution I will examine how the ELSA network has advanced this goal. I also look ahead to the time when the Gaia data will be published and consider what needs to be done to maintain European leadership.
  • We describe the results of a search for the remnants of the Sun's birth cluster among stars in the Hipparcos Catalogue. This search is based on the predicted phase space distribution of the Sun's siblings from simple simulations of the orbits of the cluster stars in a smooth Galactic potential. For stars within 100 pc the simulations show that it is interesting to examine those that have small space motions relative to the Sun. From amongst the candidate siblings thus selected there are six stars with ages consistent with that of the Sun. Considering their radial velocities and abundances only one potential candidate, HIP 21158, remains but essentially the result of the search is negative. This is consistent with predictions by Portegies Zwart (2009) on the number of siblings near the Sun. We discuss the steps that should be taken in anticipation of the data from the Gaia mission in order to conduct fruitful searches for the Sun's siblings in the future.
  • The Gaia mission is reviewed together with the expected contents of the final catalogue. It is then argued that the ultimate goal of Galactic structure studies with Gaia astrometry should be to build a dynamical model of our galaxy which is capable of explaining the contents of the Gaia catalogue. This will be possible only by comparing predicted catalogue data to Gaia's actual measurements. To complement this approach the Gaia catalogue should be used to recalibrate photometric distance and abundance indicators across the HR-diagram in order to overcome the lack of precise parallax data at the faint end of the astrometric survey. Using complementary photometric and spectroscopic data from other surveys will be essential in this respect.
  • As the title of this symposium implies, one of the aims is to examine the future of astrometry as we move from an era in which thanks to the Hipparcos Catalogue everyone has become familiar with milliarcsecond astrometry to an era in which microarcsecond astrometry will become the norm. I will take this look into the future by first providing an overview of present astrometric programmes and how they fit together and then I will attempt to identify the most promising future directions. In addition I discuss the important conditions for the maximization of the scientific return of future large and highly accurate astrometric catalogues; catalogue access and analysis tools, the availability of sufficient auxiliary data and theoretical knowledge, and the education of the future generation of astrometrists.
  • If we want to understand the evolution from star clusters to the Galactic field star population, the Solar neighbourhood is an ideal place to start. It contains objects from dense, very young clusters to old and almost dissolved moving groups. I describe the observational evidence for the ongoing dissolution of OB associations and open clusters. Subsequently, the interpretation of the local phase space distribution of stars in terms of old moving groups is discussed, emphasising the present limitations. Finally, I discuss future observational requirements and the possibilities offered by upcoming astrometric space missions.
  • Since the previous (1990) edition of this meeting enormous progress in the field of OB associations has been made. Data from X-ray satellites have greatly advanced the study of the low-mass stellar content of associations, while astrometric data from the Hipparcos satellite allow for a characterization of the higher-mass content of associations with unprecedented accuracy. We review recent work on the OB associations located within 1.5 kpc from the Sun, discuss the Hipparcos results at length, and point out directions for future research.