• We present the discovery and measurements of a gravitationally lensed supernova (SN) behind the galaxy cluster MOO J1014+0038. Based on multi-band Hubble Space Telescope and Very Large Telescope (VLT) photometry of the supernova, and VLT spectroscopy of the host galaxy, we find a 97.5% probability that this SN is a SN Ia, and a 2.5% chance of a CC SN. Our typing algorithm combines the shape and color of the light curve with the expected rates of each SN type in the host galaxy. With a redshift of 2.2216, this is the highest redshift SN Ia discovered with a spectroscopic host-galaxy redshift. A further distinguishing feature is that the lensing cluster, at redshift 1.23, is the most distant to date to have an amplified SN. The SN lies in the middle of the color and light-curve shape distributions found at lower redshift, disfavoring strong evolution to z = 2.22. We estimate an amplification due to gravitational lensing of 2.8+0.6-0.5 (1.10 +- 0.23 mag)---compatible with the value estimated from the weak-lensing-derived mass and the mass-concentration relation from LambdaCDM simulations---making it the most amplified SN Ia discovered behind a galaxy cluster.
  • We report spectroscopic results from our 40-orbit $Hubble~Space~Telescope$ slitless grism spectroscopy program observing the 20 densest CARLA candidate galaxy clusters at $1.4 < z < 2.8$. These candidate rich structures, among the richest and most distant known, were identified on the basis of $[3.6]-[4.5]$ color from a $408~$hr multi-cycle $Spitzer$ program targeting $420$ distant radio-loud AGN. We report the spectroscopic confirmation of $16$ distant structures at $1.4 < z < 2.8$ associated with the targeted powerful high-redshift radio-loud AGN. We also report the serendipitous discovery and spectroscopic confirmation of seven additional structures at $0.87 < z < 2.12$ not associated with the targeted radio-loud AGN. We find that $10^{10} - 10^{11}\,M_{\odot}$ member galaxies of our confirmed CARLA structures form significantly fewer stars than their field counterparts at all redshifts within $1.4\leq z\leq 2$. We also observe higher star-forming activity in the structure cores up to $z = 2$, finding similar trends as cluster surveys at slightly lower redshifts ($1.0 < z < 1.5$). By design, our efficient strategy of obtaining just two grism orbits per field only obtains spectroscopic confirmation of emission-line galaxies. Deeper spectroscopy will be required to study the population of evolved, massive galaxies in these (forming) clusters. Lacking multi-band coverage of the fields, we adopt a very conservative approach of calling all confirmations "structures", although we note that a number of features are consistent with some of them being bona fide galaxy clusters. Together, this survey represents a unique and large homogenous sample of spectroscopically confirmed structures at high redshifts, potentially more than doubling the census of confirmed, massive clusters at $z > 1.4$.
  • With Hubble Space Telescope imaging, we investigate the progenitor population and formation mechanisms of the intracluster light (ICL) for 23 galaxy groups and clusters ranging from 3$\times10^{13}<$M$_{500,c}$ [M$_\odot$]$<9\times10^{14}$ at 0.29$<$z$<$0.89. The color gradients of the BCG+ICL become bluer with increasing radius out to 53-100 kpc for all but one system, suggesting that violent relaxation after major mergers with the BCG cannot be the dominant source of ICL. For clusters the BCG+ICL luminosity at r$<$100 kpc (0.08-0.13 r$_{500,c}$) is 1.2-3.5$\times 10^{12}$L$_\odot$; for the groups, BCG+ICL luminosities within 100 kpc (0.17-0.23 r$_{500,c}$) range between 0.7-1.3$\times 10^{12}$ L$_\odot$. The BCG+ICL stellar mass in the inner 100 kpc increases with total cluster mass as M$_\bigstar\propto$M$_{500,c}$$^{0.37\pm0.05}$. This steep slope implies that the BCG+ICL is a higher fraction of the total mass in groups than in clusters. The BCG+ICL luminosities and stellar masses are too large for the ICL stars to come from the dissolution of dwarf galaxies alone, implying instead that the ICL grows from the stripping of more massive galaxies. Using the colors of cluster members from the CLASH sample, we place conservative lower limits on the luminosities of galaxies from which the ICL could originate. We find that at 10 kpc the ICL has a color similar to massive, passive cluster galaxies ($>10^{11.6}$ M$_\odot$), while by 100 kpc this colour is equivalent to that of a 10$^{10}$ M$_\odot$ galaxy. Additionally, we find 75% of the total BCG+ICL luminosity is consistent in color of galaxies with L$>$0.2 L$_*$ (log(M$_\bigstar$[M$_\odot$])$>$10.4), assuming conservatively that these galaxies are completely disrupted. We conclude that tidal stripping of massive galaxies is the likely source of the intracluster light from 10-100 kpc (0.008-0.23 r$_{500,c}$) for galaxy groups and clusters.
  • We present constraints on variations in the initial mass function (IMF) of nine local early-type galaxies based on their low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) populations. Comprised of accreting black holes and neutron stars, these LMXBs can be used to constrain the important high mass end of the IMF. We consider the LMXB populations beyond the cores of the galaxies ($>0.2R_{e}$; covering $75-90\%$ of their stellar light) and find no evidence for systematic variations of the IMF with velocity dispersion ($\sigma$). We reject IMFs which become increasingly bottom heavy with $\sigma$, up to steep power-laws (exponent, $\alpha>2.8$) in massive galaxies ($\sigma>300$km/s), for galactocentric radii $>1/4\ R_{e}$. Previously proposed IMFs that become increasingly bottom heavy with $\sigma$ are consistent with these data if only the number of low mass stars $(<0.5M_{\odot}$) varies. We note that our results are consistent with some recent work which proposes that extreme IMFs are only present in the central regions of these galaxies. We also consider IMFs that become increasingly top-heavy with $\sigma$, resulting in significantly more LMXBs. Such a model is consistent with these observations, but additional data are required to significantly distinguish between this and an invariant IMF. For six of these galaxies, we directly compare with published IMF mismatch parameters from the Atlas3D survey, $\alpha_{dyn}$. We find good agreement with the LMXB population if galaxies with higher $\alpha_{dyn}$ have more top-heavy IMFs -- although we caution that our sample is quite small. Future LMXB observations can provide further insights into the origin of $\alpha_{dyn}$ variations.
  • We report the detection of diffuse Ly$\alpha$ emission, or Ly$\alpha$ halos (LAHs), around star-forming galaxies at $z\approx3.78$ and $2.66$ in the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey Bo\"otes field. Our samples consist of a total of $\sim$1400 galaxies, within two separate regions containing spectroscopically confirmed galaxy overdensities. They provide a unique opportunity to investigate how the LAH characteristics vary with host galaxy large-scale environment and physical properties. We stack Ly$\alpha$ images of different samples defined by these properties and measure their median LAH sizes by decomposing the stacked Ly$\alpha$ radial profile into a compact galaxy-like and an extended halo-like component. We find that the exponential scale-length of LAHs depends on UV continuum and Ly$\alpha$ luminosities, but not on Ly$\alpha$ equivalent widths or galaxy overdensity parameters. The full samples, which are dominated by low UV-continuum luminosity Ly$\alpha$ emitters ($M_{\rm UV} \gtrsim -21$), exhibit LAH sizes of 5$\,-\,6\,$kpc. However, the most UV- or Ly$\alpha$-luminous galaxies have more extended halos with scale-lengths of 7$\,-\,9\,$kpc. The stacked Ly$\alpha$ radial profiles decline more steeply than recent theoretical predictions that include the contributions from gravitational cooling of infalling gas and from low-level star formation in satellites. On the other hand, the LAH extent matches what one would expect for photons produced in the galaxy and then resonantly scattered by gas in an outflowing envelope. The observed trends of LAH sizes with host galaxy properties suggest that the physical conditions of the circumgalactic medium (covering fraction, HI column density, and outflow velocity) change with halo mass and/or star-formation rates.
  • We use the Hubble Space Telescope to obtain WFC3/F390W imaging of the supergroup SG1120-1202 at z=0.37, mapping the UV emission of 138 spectroscopically confirmed members. We measure total (F390W-F814W) colors and visually classify the UV morphology of individual galaxies as "clumpy" or "smooth." Approximately 30% of the members have pockets of UV emission (clumpy) and we identify for the first time in the group environment galaxies with UV morphologies similar to the jellyfish galaxies observed in massive clusters. We stack the clumpy UV members and measure a shallow internal color gradient, which indicates unobscured star formation is occurring throughout these galaxies. We also stack the four galaxy groups and measure a strong trend of decreasing UV emission with decreasing projected group distance ($R_{proj}$). We find that the strong correlation between decreasing UV emission and increasing stellar mass can fully account for the observed trend in (F390W-F814W) - $R_{proj}$, i.e., mass-quenching is the dominant mechanism for extinguishing UV emission in group galaxies. Our extensive multi-wavelength analysis of SG1120-1202 indicates that stellar mass is the primary predictor of UV emission, but that the increasing fraction of massive (red/smooth) galaxies at $R_{proj}$ < 2$R_{200}$ and existence of jellyfish candidates is due to the group environment.
  • We present the X-ray point source population of NGC 7457 based on 124 ks of Chandra observations. Previous deep Chandra observations of low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) in early-type galaxies have typically targeted the large populations of massive galaxies. NGC 7457 is a nearby, early-type galaxy with a stellar luminosity of $1.7\times10^{10} L_{K\odot}$, allowing us to investigate the populations in a relatively low mass galaxy. We classify the detected X-ray sources into field LMXBs, globular cluster LMXBs, and background AGN based on identifying optical counterparts in new HST/ACS images. We detect 10 field LMXBs within the $r_{ext}$ ellipse of NGC 7457 (with semi-major axis $\sim$ 9.1 kpc, ellipticity = 0.55). The corresponding number of LMXBs with $L_{x}>2\times10^{37}erg/s$ per stellar luminosity is consistent with that observed in more massive galaxies, $\sim 7$ per $10^{10} L_{K\odot}$. We detect a small globular cluster population in these HST data and show that its colour distribution is likely bimodal and that its specific frequency is similar to that of other early type galaxies. However, no X-ray emission is detected from any of these clusters. Using published data for other galaxies, we show that this non-detection is consistent with the small stellar mass of these clusters. We estimate that 0.11 (and 0.03) LMXBs are expected per $10^{6}M_{\odot}$ in metal-rich (and metal-poor) globular clusters. This corresponds to 1100 (and 330) LMXBs per $10^{10} L_{K\odot}$, highlighting the enhanced formation efficiency of LMXBs in globular clusters. A nuclear X-ray source is detected with $L_{x}$ varying from $2.8-6.8\times10^{38}erg/s$. Combining this $L_{x}$ with a published dynamical mass estimate for the central SMBH in NGC 7457, we find that $L_{x}/L_{Edd}$ varies from $0.5-1.3\times10^{-6}$.
  • Using HST slitless grism data, we report the spectroscopic confirmation of two distant structures at $z \sim 2$ associated with powerful high-redshift radio-loud AGN. These rich structures, likely (forming) clusters, are among the most distant currently known and were identified on the basis of Spitzer/IRAC [3.6] - [4.5] color. We spectroscopically confirm 9 members in the field of MRC 2036-254, comprising eight star-forming galaxies and the targeted radio galaxy. The median redshift is $z = 2.000$. We spectroscopically confirm 10 members in the field of B3 0756+406, comprising eight star-forming galaxies and two AGN, including the targeted radio-loud quasar. The median redshift is $z = 1.986$. All confirmed members are within 500 kpc (1 arcmin) of the targeted AGN. We derive median (mean) star-formation rates of $\sim 35~M_{\odot}\rm ~ yr^{-1}$ ($\sim 50~M_{\odot}\rm ~ yr^{-1}$) for the confirmed star-forming members of both structures based on their [OIII]$\lambda5007$ luminosities, and estimate average galaxy stellar masses $\lesssim 1 \times 10^{11} ~M_{\odot}$ based on mid-infrared fluxes and SED modeling. Most of our confirmed members are located above the star-forming main-sequence towards starburst galaxies, consistent with clusters at these early epochs being the sites of significant levels of star formation. The structure around MRC 2036-254 shows an overdensity of IRAC-selected candidate galaxy cluster members consistent with being quiescent galaxies, while the structure around B3 0756+406 shows field values, albeit with many lower limits to colors that could allow an overdensity of faint red quiescent galaxies. The structure around MRC 2036-254 shows a red sequence of passive galaxy candidates.
  • We present new observations of the field containing the z=3.786 protocluster, PC217.96+32.3. We confirm that it is one of the largest and most overdense high-redshift structures known. Such structures are rare even in the largest cosmological simulations. We used the Mayall/MOSAIC1.1 imaging camera to image a 1.2x0.6 deg area (~150x75 comoving Mpc) surrounding the protocluster's core and discovered 165 candidate Lyman Alpha emitting galaxies (LAEs) and 788 candidate Lyman Break galaxies (LBGs). There are at least 2 overdense regions traced by the LAEs, the largest of which shows an areal overdensity in its core (i.e., within a radius of 2.5 comoving Mpc) of 14+/-7 relative to the average LAE spatial density in the imaged field. Further, the average LAE spatial density in the imaged field is twice that derived by other field LAE surveys. Spectroscopy with Keck/DEIMOS yielded redshifts for 164 galaxies (79 LAEs and 85 LBGs); 65 lie at a redshift of 3.785+/-0.010. The velocity dispersion of galaxies near the core is 350+/-40 km/s, a value robust to selection effects. The overdensities are likely to collapse into systems with present-day masses of >10^{15} solar masses and >6x10^{14} solar masses. The low velocity dispersion may suggest a dynamically young protocluster. We find a weak trend between narrow-band (Lyman Alpha) luminosity and environmental density: the Lyman Alpha luminosity is enhanced on average by 1.35X within the protocluster core. There is no evidence that the Lyman Alpha equivalent width depends on environment. These suggest that star-formation and/or AGN activity is enhanced in the higher density regions of the structure. PC217.96+32.3 is a Coma cluster analog, witnessed in the process of formation.
  • We present a weak lensing study of the galaxy cluster IDCS J1426.5+3508 at $z=1.75$, which is the highest redshift strong lensing cluster known and the most distant cluster for which a weak lensing analysis has been undertaken. Using F160W, F814W, and F606W observations with the Hubble Space Telescope, we detect tangential shear at $2\sigma$ significance. Fitting a Navarro-Frenk-White mass profile to the shear with a theoretical median mass-concentration relation, we derive a mass $M_{200,\mathrm{crit}}=2.3^{+2.1}_{-1.4}\times10^{14}$ M$_{\odot}$. This mass is consistent with previous mass estimates from the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect, X-ray, and strong lensing. The cluster lies on the local SZ-weak lensing mass scaling relation observed at low redshift, indicative of minimal evolution in this relation.
  • We study the stellar population properties of the IRAC-detected $6 \lesssim z \lesssim 10$ galaxy candidates from the Spitzer UltRa Faint SUrvey Program (SURFS UP). Using the Lyman Break selection technique, we find a total of 16 new galaxy candidates at $6 \lesssim z \lesssim 10$ with $S/N \geq 3$ in at least one of the IRAC $3.6\mu$m and $4.5\mu$m bands. According to the best mass models available for the surveyed galaxy clusters, these IRAC-detected galaxy candidates are magnified by factors of $\sim 1.2$--$5.5$. We find that the IRAC-detected $6 \lesssim z \lesssim 10$ sample is likely not a homogeneous galaxy population: some are relatively massive (stellar mass as high as $4 \times 10^9\,M_{\odot}$) and evolved (age $\lesssim 500$ Myr) galaxies, while others are less massive ($M_{\text{stellar}}\sim 10^8\,M_{\odot}$) and very young ($\sim 10$ Myr) galaxies with strong nebular emission lines that boost their rest-frame optical fluxes. We identify two Ly$\alpha$ emitters in our sample from the Keck DEIMOS spectra, one at $z_{\text{Ly}\alpha}=6.76$ (in RXJ1347) and one at $z_{\text{Ly}\alpha}=6.32$ (in MACS0454). We show that IRAC $[3.6]-[4.5]$ color, when combined with photometric redshift, can be used to identify galaxies likely with strong nebular emission lines within certain redshift windows.
  • We present a deep (100 ks) Chandra observation of IDCS J1426.5+3508, a spectroscopically confirmed, infrared-selected galaxy cluster at $z = 1.75$. This cluster is the most massive galaxy cluster currently known at $z > 1.5$, based on existing Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) and gravitational lensing detections. We confirm this high mass via a variety of X-ray scaling relations, including $T_X$-M, $f_g$-M, $Y_X$-M and $L_X$-M, finding a tight distribution of masses from these different methods, spanning M$_{500}$ = 2.3-3.3 $\times 10^{14}$ M$_{\odot}$, with the low-scatter $Y_X$-based mass $M_{500,Y_X} = 2.6^{+1.5}_{-0.5} \times 10^{14}$ M$_\odot$. IDCS J1426.5+3508 is currently the only cluster at $z > 1.5$ for which X-ray, SZ and gravitational lensing mass estimates exist, and these are in remarkably good agreement. We find a relatively tight distribution of the gas-to-total mass ratio, employing total masses from all of the aforementioned indicators, with values ranging from $f_{gas,500}$ = 0.087-0.12. We do not detect metals in the intracluster medium (ICM) of this system, placing a 2$\sigma$ upper limit of $Z(r < R_{500}) < 0.18 Z_{\odot}$. This upper limit on the metallicity suggests that this system may still be in the process of enriching its ICM. The cluster has a dense, low-entropy core, offset by $\sim$30 kpc from the X-ray centroid, which makes it one of the few "cool core" clusters discovered at $z > 1$, and the first known cool core cluster at $z > 1.2$. The offset of this core from the large-scale centroid suggests that this cluster has had a relatively recent ($\lesssim$500 Myr) merger/interaction with another massive system.
  • To understand cosmic mass assembly in the Universe at early epochs, we primarily rely on measurements of stellar mass and star formation rate of distant galaxies. In this paper, we present stellar masses and star formation rates of six high-redshift ($2.8\leq z \leq 5.7$) dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) that are strongly gravitationally lensed by foreground galaxies. These sources were first discovered by the South Pole Telescope (SPT) at millimeter wavelengths and all have spectroscopic redshifts and robust lens models derived from ALMA observations. We have conducted follow-up observations, obtaining multi-wavelength imaging data, using {\it HST}, {\it Spitzer}, {\it Herschel} and the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX). We use the high-resolution {\it HST}/WFC3 images to disentangle the background source from the foreground lens in {\it Spitzer}/IRAC data. The detections and upper limits provide important constraints on the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for these DSFGs, yielding stellar masses, IR luminosities, and star formation rates (SFRs). The SED fits of six SPT sources show that the intrinsic stellar masses span a range more than one order of magnitude with a median value $\sim$ 5 $\times 10^{10}M_{\Sun}$. The intrinsic IR luminosities range from 4$\times 10^{12}L_{\Sun}$ to 4$\times 10^{13}L_{\Sun}$. They all have prodigious intrinsic star formation rates of 510 to 4800 $M_{\Sun} {\rm yr}^{-1}$. Compared to the star-forming main sequence (MS), these six DSFGs have specific SFRs that all lie above the MS, including two galaxies that are a factor of 10 higher than the MS. Our results suggest that we are witnessing the ongoing strong starburst events which may be driven by major mergers.
  • We present confirmation of the cluster MOO J1142+1527, a massive galaxy cluster discovered as part of the Massive and Distant Clusters of WISE Survey. The cluster is confirmed to lie at $z=1.19$, and using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy we robustly detect the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) decrement at 13.2$\sigma$. The SZ data imply a mass of $\mathrm{M}_{200m}=(1.1\pm0.2)\times10^{15}$ $\mathrm{M}_\odot$, making MOO J1142+1527 the most massive galaxy cluster known at $z>1.15$ and the second most massive cluster known at $z>1$. For a standard $\Lambda$CDM cosmology it is further expected to be one of the $\sim 5$ most massive clusters expected to exist at $z\ge1.19$ over the entire sky. Our ongoing Spitzer program targeting $\sim1750$ additional candidate clusters will identify comparably rich galaxy clusters over the full extragalactic sky.
  • We present a weak gravitational lensing analysis of supergroup SG1120$-$1202, consisting of four distinct X-ray-luminous groups, that will merge to form a cluster comparable in mass to Coma at $z=0$. These groups lie within a projected separation of 1 to 4 Mpc and within $\Delta v=550$ km s$^{-1}$ and form a unique protocluster to study the matter distribution in a coalescing system. Using high-resolution {\em HST}/ACS imaging, combined with an extensive spectroscopic and imaging data set, we study the weak gravitational distortion of background galaxy images by the matter distribution in the supergroup. We compare the reconstructed projected density field with the distribution of galaxies and hot X-ray emitting gas in the system and derive halo parameters for the individual density peaks. We show that the projected mass distribution closely follows the locations of the X-ray peaks and associated brightest group galaxies. One of the groups that lies at slightly lower redshift ($z\approx 0.35$) than the other three groups ($z\approx 0.37$) is X-ray luminous, but is barely detected in the gravitational lensing signal. The other three groups show a significant detection (up to $5 \sigma$ in mass), with velocity dispersions between $355^{+55}_{-70}$ and $530^{+45}_{-55}$ km s$^{-1}$ and masses between $0.8^{+0.4}_{-0.3} \times 10^{14}$ and $1.6^{+0.5}_{-0.4}\times 10^{14} h^{-1} M_{\odot}$, consistent with independent measurements. These groups are associated with peaks in the galaxy and gas density in a relatively straightforward manner. Since the groups show no visible signs of interaction, this supports the picture that we are catching the groups before they merge into a cluster.
  • We present a detailed gravitational lens model of the galaxy cluster RCS2 J232727.6-020437. Due to cosmological dimming of cluster members and ICL, its high redshift ($z=0.6986$) makes it ideal for studying background galaxies. Using new ACS and WFC3/IR HST data, we identify 16 multiple images. From MOSFIRE follow up, we identify a strong emission line in the spectrum of one multiple image, likely confirming the redshift of that system to $z=2.083$. With a highly magnified ($\mu\gtrsim2$) source plane area of $\sim0.7$ arcmin$^2$ at $z=7$, RCS2 J232727.6-020437 has a lensing efficiency comparable to the Hubble Frontier Fields clusters. We discover four highly magnified $z\sim7$ candidate Lyman-break galaxies behind the cluster, one of which may be multiply-imaged. Correcting for magnification, we find that all four galaxies are fainter than $0.5 L_{\star}$. One candidate is detected at ${>10\sigma}$ in both Spitzer/IRAC [3.6] and [4.5] channels. A spectroscopic follow-up with MOSFIRE does not result in the detection of the Lyman-alpha emission line from any of the four candidates. From the MOSFIRE spectra we place median upper limits on the Lyman-alpha flux of $5-14 \times 10^{-19}\, \mathrm{erg \,\, s^{-1} cm^{-2}}$ ($5\sigma$).
  • We measure the star formation rates (SFRs) of massive ($M_{\star}>10^{10.1}M_{\odot}$) early-type galaxies (ETGs) in a sample of 11 high-redshift ($1.0 < z < 1.5$) galaxy clusters drawn from the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS). We identify ETGs visually from Hubble Space Telescope imaging and select likely cluster members as having either an appropriate spectroscopic redshift or red sequence color. Mid-infrared SFRs are measured using Spitzer 24 $\mu$m data for isolated cluster galaxies for which contamination by neighbors, and active galactic nuclei, can be ruled out. Cluster ETGs show enhanced specific star formation rates (sSFRs) compared to cluster galaxies in the local Universe, but have sSFRs more than four times lower than that of field ETGs at $1 < z < 1.5$. Relative to the late-type cluster population, isolated ETGs show substantially quenched mean SFRs, yet still contribute 12% of the overall star formation activity measured in $1 < z < 1.5$ clusters. We find that new ETGs are likely being formed in ISCS clusters; the fraction of cluster galaxies identified as ETGs increases from 34% to 56% from $z \sim 1.5 \rightarrow 1.25$. While the fraction of cluster ETGs that are highly star-forming ($\textrm{SFR}\geq26\ M_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$) drops from 27% to 10% over the same period, their sSFRs are roughly constant. All these factors taken together suggest that, particularly at $z\gtrsim1.25$, the events that created these distant cluster ETGs$-$likely mergers, at least among the most massive$-$were both recent and gas-rich.
  • We present an analysis of the clustering of high-redshift galaxies in the recently completed 94 deg$^2$ Spitzer-SPT Deep Field survey. Applying flux and color cuts to the mid-infrared photometry efficiently selects galaxies at $z\sim1.5$ in the stellar mass range $10^{10}-10^{11}M_\odot$, making this sample the largest used so far to study such a distant population. We measure the angular correlation function in different flux-limited samples at scales $>6^{\prime \prime}$ (corresponding to physical distances $>0.05$ Mpc) and thereby map the one- and two-halo contributions to the clustering. We fit halo occupation distributions and determine how the central galaxy's stellar mass and satellite occupation depend on the halo mass. We measure a prominent peak in the stellar-to-halo mass ratio at a halo mass of $\log(M_{\rm halo} / M_\odot) = 12.44\pm0.08$, 4.5 times higher than the $z=0$ value. This supports the idea of an evolving mass threshold above which star formation is quenched. We estimate the large-scale bias in the range $b_g=2-4$ and the satellite fraction to be $f_\mathrm{sat}\sim0.2$, showing a clear evolution compared to $z=0$. We also find that, above a given stellar mass limit, the fraction of galaxies that are in similar mass pairs is higher at $z=1.5$ than at $z=0$. In addition, we measure that this fraction mildly increases with the stellar mass limit at $z=1.5$, which is the opposite of the behavior seen at low-redshift.
  • We present optical and infrared imaging and optical spectroscopy of galaxy clusters which were identified as part of an all-sky search for high-redshift galaxy clusters, the Massive and Distant Clusters of WISE Survey (MaDCoWS). The initial phase of MaDCoWS combined infrared data from the all-sky data release of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) with optical data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to select probable z ~ 1 clusters of galaxies over an area of 10,000 deg^2. Our spectroscopy confirms 19 new clusters at 0.7 < z < 1.3, half of which are at z > 1, demonstrating the viability of using WISE to identify high-redshift galaxy clusters. The next phase of MaDCoWS will use the greater depth of the AllWISE data release to identify even higher redshift cluster candidates.
  • We identify a strong lensing galaxy in the cluster IRC 0218 (also known as XMM-LSS J02182$-$05102) that is spectroscopically confirmed to be at $z=1.62$, making it the highest-redshift strong lens galaxy known. The lens is one of the two brightest cluster galaxies and lenses a background source galaxy into an arc and a counterimage. With Hubble Space Telescope (HST) grism and Keck/LRIS spectroscopy, we measure the source redshift to be $z_{\rm S}=2.26$. Using HST imaging in ACS/F475W, ACS/F814W, WFC3/F125W, and WFC3/F160W, we model the lens mass distribution with an elliptical power-law profile and account for the effects of the cluster halo and nearby galaxies. The Einstein radius is $\theta_{\rm E}=0.38^{+0.02}_{-0.01}$" ($3.2_{-0.1}^{+0.2}$ kpc) and the total enclosed mass is M$_{\rm tot} (< \theta_{\rm E})=1.8^{+0.2}_{-0.1}\times10^{11}~{\rm M}_{\odot}$. We estimate that the cluster environment contributes $\sim10$% of this total mass. Assuming a Chabrier IMF, the dark matter fraction within $\theta_{{\rm E}}$ is $f_{\rm DM}^{{\rm Chab}} = 0.3_{-0.3}^{+0.1}$, while a Salpeter IMF is marginally inconsistent with the enclosed mass ($f_{\rm DM}^{{\rm Salp}} = -0.3_{-0.5}^{+0.2}$). The total magnification of the source is $\mu_{\rm tot}=2.1_{-0.3}^{+0.4}$. The source has at least one bright compact region offset from the source center. Emission from Ly$\alpha$ and [O III] are likely to probe different regions in the source.
  • We report the discovery of a large-scale structure containing multiple protoclusters at z=3.78 in the Bo\"otes field. The spectroscopic discovery of five galaxies at z=3.783+/-0.002 lying within 1 Mpc of one another led us to undertake a deep narrow- and broad-band imaging survey of the surrounding field. Within a comoving volume of 72x72x25 Mpc^3, we have identified 65 Lyman alpha emitter (LAE) candidates at z=3.795+/-0.015, and four additional galaxies at z_spec=3.730,3.753,3.780,3.835. The galaxy distribution within the field is highly non-uniform, exhibiting three large (~3-5x) overdensities separated by 8-14 Mpc (physical) and possibly connected by filamentary structures traced by LAEs. The observed number of LAEs in the entire field is nearly twice the average expected in field environments, based on estimates of the Lya luminosity function at these redshifts. We estimate that by z=0 the largest overdensity will grow into a cluster of mass 10^15 Msun; the two smaller overdensities will grow into clusters of mass (2-6)x10^14 Msun. The highest concentration of galaxies is located at the southern end of the image, suggesting that the current imaging may not map the true extent of the large scale structure. Finding three large protocluster candidates within a single 0.3 deg^2 field is highly unusual; expectations from theory suggest that such alignments should occur less than 2% of the time. Searching for and characterizing such structures and accurately measuring their volume space density can therefore place constraints on the theory of structure formation. Such regions can also serve as laboratories for the study of galaxy formation in dense environments.
  • We present 4.5 {\mu}m luminosity functions for galaxies identified in 178 candidate galaxy clusters at 1.3 < z < 3.2. The clusters were identified as Spitzer/IRAC color-selected overdensities in the Clusters Around Radio-Loud AGN (CARLA) project, which imaged 421 powerful radio-loud AGN at z > 1.3. The luminosity functions are derived for different redshift and richness bins, and the IRAC imaging reaches depths of m*+2, allowing us to measure the faint end slopes of the luminosity functions. We find that {\alpha} = -1 describes the luminosity function very well in all redshifts bins and does not evolve significantly. This provides evidence that the rate at which the low mass galaxy population grows through star formation, gets quenched and is replenished by in-falling field galaxies does not have a major net effect on the shape of the luminosity function. Our measurements for m* are consistent with passive evolution models and high formation redshifts z_f ~ 3. We find a slight trend towards fainter m* for the richest clusters, implying that the most massive clusters in our sample could contain older stellar populations, yet another example of cosmic downsizing. Modelling shows that a contribution of a star-forming population of up to 40% cannot be ruled out. This value, found from our targeted survey, is significantly lower than the values found for slightly lower redshift, z ~ 1, clusters found in wide-field surveys. The results are consistent with cosmic downsizing, as the clusters studied here were all found in the vicinity of radio-loud AGNs -- which have proven to be preferentially located in massive dark matter halos in the richest environments at high redshift -- they may therefore be older and more evolved systems than the general protocluster population.
  • SURFSUP is a joint Spitzer and HST Exploration Science program using 10 galaxy clusters as cosmic telescopes to study z >~ 7 galaxies at intrinsically lower luminosities, enabled by gravitational lensing, than blank field surveys of the same exposure time. Our main goal is to measure stellar masses and ages of these galaxies, which are the most likely sources of the ionizing photons that drive reionization. Accurate knowledge of the star formation density and star formation history at this epoch is necessary to determine whether these galaxies indeed reionized the universe. Determination of the stellar masses and ages requires measuring rest frame optical light, which only Spitzer can probe for sources at z >~ 7, for a large enough sample of typical galaxies. Our program consists of 550 hours of Spitzer/IRAC imaging covering 10 galaxy clusters with very well-known mass distributions, making them extremely precise cosmic telescopes. We combine our data with archival observations to obtain mosaics with ~30 hours exposure time in both 3.6$\mu$m and 4.5$\mu$m in the central 4 arcmin x 4 arcmin field and ~15 hours in the flanking fields. This results in 3-$\sigma$ sensitivity limits of ~26.6 and ~26.2AB magnitudes for the central field in the IRAC 3.6 and 4.5$\mu$m bands, respectively. To illustrate the survey strategy and characteristics we introduce the sample, present the details of the data reduction and demonstrate that these data are sufficient for in-depth studies of z >~ 7 sources (using a z=9.5 galaxy behind MACSJ1149.5+2223 as an example). For the first cluster of the survey (the Bullet Cluster) we have released all high-level data mosaics and IRAC empirical PSF models. In the future we plan to release these data products for the entire survey.
  • We classify the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 431,038 sources in the 9 sq. deg Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS). There are up to 17 bands of data available per source, including ultraviolet (GALEX), optical (NDWFS), near-IR (NEWFIRM), and mid-infrared (IRAC/MIPS) data, as well as spectroscopic redshifts for ~20,000 objects, primarily from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES). We fit galaxy, AGN, stellar, and brown dwarf templates to the observed SEDs, which yield spectral classes for the Galactic sources and photometric redshifts and galaxy/AGN luminosities for the extragalactic sources. The photometric redshift precision of the galaxy and AGN samples are sigma/(1+z)=0.040 and sigma/(1+z)=0.169, respectively, with the worst 5% outliers excluded. Based on the reduced chi-squared of the SED fit for each SED model, we are able to distinguish between Galactic and extragalactic sources for sources brighter than I=23.5. We compare the SED fits for a galaxy-only model and a galaxy+AGN model. Using known X-ray and spectroscopic AGN samples, we confirm that SED fitting can be successfully used as a method to identify large populations of AGN, including spatially resolved AGN with significant contributions from the host galaxy and objects with the emission line ratios of "composite" spectra. We also use our results to compare to the X-ray, mid-IR, optical color and emission line ratio selection techniques. For an F-ratio threshold of F>10 we find 16,266 AGN candidates brighter than I=23.5 and a surface density of ~1900 AGN per deg^2.
  • A number of recent studies have proposed that the stellar initial mass function (IMF) of early type galaxies varies systematically as a function of galaxy mass, with higher mass galaxies having bottom heavy IMFs. These bottom heavy IMFs have more low-mass stars relative to the number of high mass stars, and therefore naturally result in proportionally fewer neutron stars and black holes. In this paper, we specifically predict the variation in the number of black holes and neutron stars based on the power-law IMF variation required to reproduce the observed mass-to-light ratio trends with galaxy mass. We then test whether such variations are observed by studying the field low-mass X-ray binary populations (LMXBs) of nearby early-type galaxies. In these binaries, a neutron star or black hole accretes matter from a low-mass donor star. Their number is therefore expected to scale with the number of black holes and neutron stars present in a galaxy. We find that the number of LMXBs per K-band light is similar among the galaxies in our sample. These data therefore demonstrate the uniformity of the slope of the IMF from massive stars down to those now dominating the K-band light, and are consistent with an invariant IMF. Our results are inconsistent with an IMF which varies from a Kroupa/Chabrier like IMF for low mass galaxies to a steep power-law IMF (with slope $x$=2.8) for high mass galaxies. We discuss how these observations constrain the possible forms of the IMF variations and how future Chandra observations can enable sharper tests of the IMF.