• We constrain the stellar population properties of a sample of 52 massive galaxies, with stellar mass $\log M_s/M_\odot>10.5$, over the redshift range 0.5<z<2 by use of observer-frame optical and near-infrared slitless spectra from Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 grisms. The deep exposures allow us to target individual spectra of massive galaxies to F160W=22.5AB. Our fitting approach uses a set of six base models adapted to the redshift and spectral resolution of each observation, and fits the weights of the base models via a MCMC method. The sample comprises a mixed distribution of quiescent (19) and star-forming galaxies (33). Using the cumulative distribution of stellar ages by mass, we define a "quenching timescale" that is found to correlate with stellar mass. The other population parameters, aside from metallicity, do not show such a strong correlation, although all display the characteristic segregation between quiescent and star-forming populations. Radial colour gradients within each galaxy are also explored, finding a wider scatter in the star-forming subsample, but no conclusive trend with respect to the population parameters. Environment is also studied, with at most a subtle effect towards older ages in high-density environments.
  • We reconstruct the two-dimensional (2D) matter distributions in 20 high-mass galaxy clusters selected from the CLASH survey, by using the new approach of performing a joint weak lensing analysis of 2D shear and azimuthally averaged magnification measurements. This combination allows for a complete analysis of the field, effectively breaking the mass-sheet degeneracy. In a Bayesian framework, we simultaneously constrain the mass profile and morphology of each individual cluster assuming an elliptical Navarro-Frenk-White halo characterized by the mass, concentration, projected axis ratio, and position angle of the projected major axis.. We find that spherical mass estimates of the clusters from azimuthally averaged weak-lensing measurements in previous work are in excellent agreement with our results from a full 2D analysis. Combining all 20 clusters in our sample, we detect the elliptical shape of weak-lensing halos at the $5\sigma$ significance level within a scale of 2Mpc$/h$. The median projected axis ratio is $0.67\pm 0.07$ at a virial mass of $M_\mathrm{vir}=(15.2\pm 2.8) \times 10^{14} M_\odot$, which is in agreement with theoretical predictions of the standard collisionless cold dark matter model. We also study misalignment statistics of brightest cluster galaxy, X-ray, thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, and strong-lensing morphologies with respect to the weak-lensing signal. Among the three baryonic tracers studied here, we find that the X-ray morphology is best aligned with the weak-lensing mass distribution, with a median misalignment angle of $21\pm 7$ degrees. We also conduct a stacked quadrupole shear analysis assuming that the X-ray major axis is aligned with that of the projected mass distribution. This yields a consistent axis ratio of $0.67\pm 0.10$, suggesting again a tight alignment between the intracluster gas and dark matter.
  • We improve the accuracy of photometric redshifts by including low-resolution spectral data from the G102 grism on the Hubble Space Telescope, which assists in redshift determination by further constraining the shape of the broadband Spectral Energy Disribution (SED) and identifying spectral features. The photometry used in the redshift fits includes near-IR photometry from FIGS+CANDELS, as well as optical data from ground-based surveys and HST ACS, and mid-IR data from Spitzer. We calculated the redshifts through the comparison of measured photometry with template galaxy models, using the EAZY photometric redshift code. For objects with F105W $< 26.5$ AB mag with a redshift range of $0 < z < 6$, we find a typical error of $\Delta z = 0.03 * (1+z)$ for the purely photometric redshifts; with the addition of FIGS spectra, these become $\Delta z = 0.02 * (1+z)$, an improvement of 50\%. Addition of grism data also reduces the outlier rate from 8\% to 7\% across all fields. With the more-accurate spectrophotometric redshifts (SPZs), we searched the FIGS fields for galaxy overdensities. We identified 24 overdensities across the 4 fields. The strongest overdensity, matching a spectroscopically identified cluster at $z=0.85$, has 28 potential member galaxies, of which 8 have previous spectroscopic confirmation, and features a corresponding X-ray signal. Another corresponding to a cluster at $z=1.84$ has 22 members, 18 of which are spectroscopically confirmed. Additionally, we find 4 overdensities that are detected at an equal or higher significance in at least one metric to the two confirmed clusters.
  • We present a detailed spectral analysis of the brightest Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) identified in the 7Ms Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S) survey over a time span of 16 years. Using a model of an intrinsically absorbed power-law plus reflection, with possible soft excess and narrow Fe K$\alpha$ line, we perform a systematic X-ray spectral analysis, both on the total 7Ms exposure and in four different periods with lengths of 2-21 months. With this approach, we not only present the power-law slopes, column densities $N_H$, observed fluxes, and absorption-corrected 2-10~keV luminosities $L_X$ for our sample of AGNs, but also identify significant spectral variabilities among them on time scales of years. We find that the $N_H$ variabilities can be ascribed to two different types of mechanisms, either flux-driven or flux-independent. We also find that the correlation between the narrow Fe line EW and $N_H$ can be well explained by the continuum suppression with increasing $N_H$. Accounting for the sample incompleteness and bias, we measure the intrinsic distribution of $N_H$ for the CDF-S AGN population and present re-selected subsamples which are complete with respect to $N_H$. The $N_H$-complete subsamples enable us to decouple the dependences of $N_H$ on $L_X$ and on redshift. Combining our data with that from C-COSMOS, we confirm the anti-correlation between the average $N_H$ and $L_X$ of AGN, and find a significant increase of the AGN obscured fraction with redshift at any luminosity. The obscured fraction can be described as $f_{obscured}\thickapprox 0.42\ (1+z)^{0.60}$.
  • An interesting transient has been detected in one of our three Dark Energy Camera deep fields. Observations of these deep fields take advantage of the high red sensitivity of DECam on the Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory Blanco telescope. The survey includes the Y band with rest wavelength 1430{\AA} at z = 6. Survey fields (the Prime field 0555-6130, the 16hr field 1600-75 and the SUDSS New Southern Field) are deeper in Y than other infrared surveys. They are circumpolar, allowing all night to be used efficiently, exploiting the moon tolerance of 1 micron observations to minimize conflict with the Dark Energy Survey. As an i-band dropout (meaning that the flux decrement shortward of Lyman alpha is in the i bandpass), the transient we report here is a supernova candidate with z ~ 6, with a luminosity comparable to the brightest known current epoch superluminous supernova (i.e., ~ 2 x 10^11 solar luminosities).
  • Since galaxy clusters sit at the high-end of the mass function, the number of galaxy clusters both massive and concentrated enough to yield particularly large Einstein radii poses useful constraints on cosmological and structure formation models. To date, less than a handful of clusters are known to have Einstein radii exceeding $\sim40$" (for a source at $z_{s}\simeq2$, nominally). Here, we report an addition to that list of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) selected cluster, PLCK G287.0+32.9 ($z=0.38$), the second-highest SZ-mass ($M_{500}$) cluster from the Planck catalog. We present the first strong lensing analysis of the cluster, identifying 20 sets of multiply-imaged galaxies and candidates in new \emph{Hubble Space Telescope} data, including a long, $l\sim22$" giant arc, as well as a quadruply-imaged, apparently bright (magnified to J$_{F110W}=$25.3 AB), likely high-redshift dropout galaxy at $z_{phot}=6.90$ [6.13--8.43] (95\% C.I.). Our analysis reveals a very large critical area (1.55 arcmin$^{2}$, $z_{s}\simeq2$), corresponding to an effective Einstein radius of $\theta_{E}\sim42$". The model suggests the critical area will expand to 2.58 arcmin$^{2}$ ($\theta_{E}\sim54$") for sources at $z_{s}\sim10$. Our work adds to recent efforts to model very massive clusters towards the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope, in order to identify the most useful cosmic lenses for studying the early Universe. Spectroscopic redshifts for the multiply-imaged galaxies and additional HST data will be necessary for refining the lens model and verifying the nature of the $z\sim7$ dropout.
  • We derive relations between the effective radii $R_{\rm{eff}}$ of galaxies and the virial radii $R_{200c}$ of their dark matter halos over the redshift range $0 < z < 3$. For galaxies, we use the measured sizes from deep images taken with \emph{Hubble Space Telescope} for the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey; for halos, we use the inferred sizes from abundance matching to cosmological dark matter simulations via a stellar mass--halo mass (SMHM) relation. For this purpose, we derive a new SMHM relation based on the same selection criteria and other assumptions as for our sample of galaxies with size measurements. As a check on the robustness of our results, we also derive $R_{\rm{eff}}$--$R_{200c}$ relations for three independent SMHM relations from the literature. We find that galaxy $R_{\rm{eff}}$ is proportional on average to halo $R_{200c}$, confirming and extending to high redshifts the $z=0$ results of Kravtsov. Late-type galaxies (with low S\'ersic index and high specific star formation rate [sSFR]) follow a linear $R_{\rm{eff}}$--$R_{200c}$ relation, with effective radii at $0.5 < z < 3$ close to those predicted by simple models of disk formation; at $z < 0.5$, the sizes of late-type galaxies appear to be slightly below this prediction. Early-type galaxies (with high S\'ersic index and low sSFR) follow a roughly parallel $R_{\rm{eff}}$--$R_{200c}$ relation, $\sim$ 0.2--0.3 dex below the one for late-type galaxies. Our observational results, reinforced by recent hydrodynamical simulations, indicate that galaxies grow quasi-homologously with their dark matter halos.
  • We present the rest-1500\AA\ UV luminosity functions (LF) for star-forming galaxies during the cosmic \textit{high noon} -- the peak of cosmic star formation rate at $1.5<z<3$. We use deep NUV imaging data obtained as part of the \textit{Hubble} Ultra-Violet Ultra Deep Field (UVUDF) program, along with existing deep optical and NIR coverage on the HUDF. We select F225W, F275W and F336W dropout samples using the Lyman break technique, along with samples in the corresponding redshift ranges selected using photometric redshifts and measure the rest-frame UV LF at $z\sim1.7,2.2,3.0$ respectively, using the modified maximum likelihood estimator. We perform simulations to quantify the survey and sample incompleteness for the UVUDF samples to correct the effective volume calculations for the LF. We select galaxies down to $M_{UV}=-15.9,-16.3,-16.8$ and fit a faint-end slope of $\alpha=-1.20^{+0.10}_{-0.13}, -1.32^{+0.10}_{-0.14}, -1.39^{+0.08}_{-0.12}$ at $1.4<z<1.9$, $1.8<z<2.6$, and $2.4<z<3.6$, respectively. We compare the star formation properties of $z\sim2$ galaxies from these UV observations with results from H\alpha\ and UV$+$IR observations. We find a lack of high SFR sources in the UV LF compared to the H\alpha\ and UV$+$IR, likely due to dusty SFGs not being properly accounted for by the generic $IRX-\beta$ relation used to correct for dust. We compute a volume-averaged UV-to-H\alpha\ ratio by \textit{abundance matching} the rest-frame UV LF and H\alpha\ LF. We find an increasing UV-to-H\alpha\ ratio towards low mass galaxies ($M_\star \lesssim 5\times10^9$ M$_\odot$). We conclude that this could be due to a larger contribution from starbursting galaxies compared to the high-mass end.
  • Superluminous supernovae are beginning to be discovered at redshifts as early as the epoch of reionization. A number of candidate mechanisms is reviewed, together with the discovery programs.
  • Angular power spectra of optical and infrared background anisotropies at wavelengths between 0.5 to 5 $\mu$m are a useful probe of faint sources present during reionization, in addition to faint galaxies and diffuse signals at low redshift. The cross-correlation of these fluctuations with backgrounds at other wavelengths can be used to separate some of these signals. A previous study on the cross-correlation between X-ray and $Spitzer$ fluctuations at 3.6 $\mu$m and 4.5 $\mu$m has been interpreted as evidence for direct collapse blackholes (DCBHs) present at $z > 12$. Here we return to this cross-correlation and study its wavelength dependence from 0.5 to 4.5 $\mu$m using $Hubble$ and $Spitzer$ data in combination with a subset of the 4 Ms $Chandra$ observations in GOODS-S/ECDFS. Our study involves five $Hubble$ bands at 0.6, 0.7, 0.85, 1.25 and 1.6 $\mu$m, and two $Spitzer$-IRAC bands at 3.6 $\mu$m and 4.5 $\mu$m. We confirm the previously seen cross-correlation between 3.6 $\mu$m (4.5 $\mu$m) and X-rays with 3.7$\sigma$ (4.2$\sigma$) and 2.7$\sigma$ (3.7$\sigma$) detections in the soft [0.5-2] keV and hard [2-8] keV X-ray bands, respectively, at angular scales above 20 arcseconds. The cross-correlation of X-rays with $Hubble$ is largely anticorrelated, ranging between the levels of 1.4$-$3.5$\sigma$ for all the $Hubble$ and X-ray bands. This lack of correlation in the shorter optical/NIR bands implies the sources responsible for the cosmic infrared background at 3.6 and 4.5~$\mu$m are at least partly dissimilar to those at 1.6 $\mu$m and shorter.
  • We present $\mathrm{^{12}CO}$ and $\mathrm{^{13}CO}$ molecular gas data observed by ALMA, massive early stage young stellar objects identified by applying color-magnitude cuts to \textit{Spitzer} and \textit{Herschel} photometry, and low-mass late stage young stellar objects identified via H$\mathrm{\alpha}$ excess. Using dendrograms, we derive properties for the molecular cloud structures. This is the first time a dendrogram analysis has been applied to extragalactic clouds. The majority of clumps have a virial parameter equal to unity or less. The size-linewidth relations of $\mathrm{^{12}CO}$ and $\mathrm{^{13}CO}$ show the clumps in this study have a larger linewidth for a given size (by factor of 3.8 and 2.5, respectively) in comparison to several, but not all, previous studies. The larger linewidths in 30 Doradus compared to typical Milky Way quiescent clumps are probably due to the highly energetic environmental conditions of 30 Doradus. The slope of the size-linewidth relations of $\mathrm{^{12}CO}$, 0.65 $\pm$ 0.04, and $\mathrm{^{13}CO}$, 0.97 $\pm$ 0.12, are on the higher end but consistent within 3$\mathrm{\sigma}$ of previous studies. Massive star formation occurs in clumps with high masses ($> 1.83 \times 10^{2}\;\mathrm{M_{\odot}}$), high linewidths (v $> 1.18\;\mathrm{km/s}$), and high mass densities ($> 6.67 \times 10^{2}\;\mathrm{M_{\odot}\;pc^{-2}}$). The majority of embedded, massive young stellar objects are associated with a clump. However the majority of more evolved, low-mass young stellar objects are not associated with a clump.
  • We exploit the 7 Ms \textit{Chandra} observations in the \chandra\,Deep Field-South (\mbox{CDF-S}), the deepest X-ray survey to date, coupled with CANDELS/GOODS-S data, to measure the total X-ray emission arising from 2076 galaxies at $3.5\leq z < 6.5$. This aim is achieved by stacking the \textit{Chandra} data at the positions of optically selected galaxies, reaching effective exposure times of $\geq10^9\mathrm{s}$. We detect significant ($>3.7\sigma$) X-ray emission from massive galaxies at $z\approx4$. We also report the detection of massive galaxies at $z\approx5$ at a $99.7\%$ confidence level ($2.7\sigma$), the highest significance ever obtained for X-ray emission from galaxies at such high redshifts. No significant signal is detected from galaxies at even higher redshifts. The stacking results place constraints on the BHAD associated with the known high-redshift galaxy samples, as well as on the SFRD at high redshift, assuming a range of prescriptions for X-ray emission due to X- ray binaries. We find that the X-ray emission from our sample is likely dominated by processes related to star formation. Our results show that low-rate mass accretion onto SMBHs in individually X-ray-undetected galaxies is negligible, compared with the BHAD measured for samples of X-ray detected AGN, for cosmic SMBH mass assembly at high redshift. We also place, for the first time, constraints on the faint-end of the AGN X-ray luminosity function ($\mathrm{logL_X\sim42}$) at $z>4$, with evidence for fairly flat slopes. The implications of all of these findings are discussed in the context of the evolution of the AGN population at high redshift.
  • We present results from a survey of the internal kinematics of 49 star-forming galaxies at z$\,\sim\,$2 in the CANDELS fields with the Keck/MOSFIRE spectrograph (SIGMA, Survey in the near-Infrared of Galaxies with Multiple position Angles). Kinematics (rotation velocity $V_{rot}$ and integrated gas velocity dispersion $\sigma_g$) are measured from nebular emission lines which trace the hot ionized gas surrounding star-forming regions. We find that by z$\,\sim\,$2, massive star-forming galaxies ($\log\,M_*/M_{\odot}\gtrsim10.2$) have assembled primitive disks: their kinematics are dominated by rotation, they are consistent with a marginally stable disk model, and they form a Tully-Fisher relation. These massive galaxies have values of $V_{rot}/\sigma_g$ which are factors of 2-5 lower than local well-ordered galaxies at similar masses. Such results are consistent with findings by other studies. We find that low mass galaxies ($\log\,M_*/M_{\odot}\lesssim10.2$) at this epoch are still in the early stages of disk assembly: their kinematics are often supported by gas velocity dispersion and they fall from the Tully-Fisher relation to significantly low values of $V_{rot}$. This "kinematic downsizing" implies that the process(es) responsible for disrupting disks at z$\,\sim\,$2 have a stronger effect and/or are more active in low mass systems. In conclusion, we find that the period of rapid stellar mass growth at z$\,\sim\,$2 is coincident with the nascent assembly of low mass disks and the assembly and settling of high mass disks.
  • Dust attenuation affects nearly all observational aspects of galaxy evolution, yet very little is known about the form of the dust-attenuation law in the distant Universe. Here, we model the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies at z = 1.5--3 from CANDELS with rest-frame UV to near-IR imaging under different assumptions about the dust law, and compare the amount of inferred attenuated light with the observed infrared (IR) luminosities. Some individual galaxies show strong Bayesian evidence in preference of one dust law over another, and this preference agrees with their observed location on the plane of infrared excess (IRX, $L_{\text{TIR}}/L_{\text{UV}}$) and UV slope ($\beta$). We generalize the shape of the dust law with an empirical model, $A_{\lambda,\delta}=E(B-V)\ k_\lambda\ (\lambda/\lambda_V)^\delta$ where $k_\lambda$ is the dust law of Calzetti et al. (2000), and show that there exists a correlation between the color excess ${E(B-V)}$ and tilt $\delta$ with ${\delta=(0.62\pm0.05)\log(E(B-V))}$+ ${(0.26~\pm~0.02)}$. Galaxies with high color excess have a shallower, starburst-like law, and those with low color excess have a steeper, SMC-like law. Surprisingly, the galaxies in our sample show no correlation between the shape of the dust law and stellar mass, star-formation rate, or $\beta$. The change in the dust law with color excess is consistent with a model where attenuation is caused by by scattering, a mixed star-dust geometry, and/or trends with stellar population age, metallicity, and dust grain size. This rest-frame UV-to-near-IR method shows potential to constrain the dust law at even higher ($z>3$) redshifts.
  • Morphology is often used to infer the state of relaxation of galaxy clusters. The regularity, symmetry, and degree to which a cluster is centrally concentrated inform quantitative measures of cluster morphology. The Cluster Lensing and Supernova survey with Hubble Space Telescope (CLASH) used weak and strong lensing to measure the distribution of matter within a sample of 25 clusters, 20 of which were deemed to be relaxed based on their X-ray morphology and alignment of the X-ray emission with the BCG. Towards a quantitative characterization of this important sample of clusters, we present uniformly estimated X-ray morphological statistics for all 25 CLASH clusters. We compare X-ray morphologies of CLASH clusters with those identically measured for a large sample of simulated clusters from the MUSIC-2 simulations, selected by mass. We confirm a threshold in X-ray surface brightness concentration of C>0.4 for cool-core clusters, where C is the ratio of X-ray emission inside 100 kpc/h70 compared to inside 500 kpc/h70. We report and compare morphologies of these clusters inferred from Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect (SZE) maps of the hot gas and in from projected mass maps based on strong and weak lensing. We find a strong agreement in alignments of the orientation of major axes for the lensing, X-ray, and SZE maps of nearly all of the CLASH clusters at radii of 500 kpc (approximately 0.5R500 for these clusters). We also find a striking alignment of clusters shapes at the 500 kpc scale, as measured with X-ray, SZE, and lensing, with that of the near-infrared stellar light at 10 kpc scales for the 20 "relaxed" clusters. This strong alignment indicates a powerful coupling between the cluster- and galaxy-scale galaxy formation processes.
  • We developed an algorithm to find and characterize gravitationally lensed galaxies (arcs) to perform a comparison of the observed and simulated arc abundance. Observations are from the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). Simulated CLASH images are created using the MOKA package and also clusters selected from the high resolution, hydrodynamical simulations, MUSIC, over the same mass and redshift range as the CLASH sample. The algorithm' s arc elongation accuracy, completeness and false positive rate are determined and used to compute an estimate of the true arc abundance. We derive a lensing efficiency of $4 \pm 1$ arcs (with length $\ge 6"$ and length-to-width ratio $\ge 7$) per cluster for the X-ray selected CLASH sample, $4 \pm 1$ arcs per cluster for the MOKA simulated sample and $3 \pm 1$ arcs per cluster for the MUSIC simulated sample. The observed and simulated arc statistics are in full agreement. We measure the photometric redshifts of all detected arcs and find a median redshift $z_s = 1.9$ with 33% of the detected arcs having $z_s > 3$. We find that the arc abundance does not depend strongly on the source redshift distribution but is sensitive to the mass distribution of the dark matter halos (e.g. the $c-M$ relation). Our results show that consistency between the observed and simulated distributions of lensed arc sizes and axial ratios can be achieved by using cluster-lensing simulations that are carefully matched to the selection criteria used in the observations.
  • We have undertaken an ambitious program to visually classify all galaxies in the five CANDELS fields down to H<24.5 involving the dedicated efforts of 65 individual classifiers. Once completed, we expect to have detailed morphological classifications for over 50,000 galaxies up to z<4 over all the fields. Here, we present our detailed visual classification scheme, which was designed to cover a wide range of CANDELS science goals. This scheme includes the basic Hubble sequence types, but also includes a detailed look at mergers and interactions, the clumpiness of galaxies, $k$-corrections, and a variety of other structural properties. In this paper, we focus on the first field to be completed -- GOODS-S. The wide area coverage spanning the full field includes 7634 galaxies that have been classified by at least three different people. In the deep area of the field, 2534 galaxies have been classified by at least five different people at three different depths. With this paper, we release to the public all of the visual classifications in GOODS-S along with the GUI that we developed to classify galaxies. We find that the level of agreement among classifiers is good and depends on both the galaxy magnitude and the galaxy type, with disks showing the highest level of agreement and irregulars the lowest. A comparison of our classifications with the Sersic index and rest-frame colors shows a clear separation between disk and spheroid populations. Finally, we explore morphological k-corrections between the V-band and H-band observations and find that a small fraction (84 galaxies in total) are classified as being very different between these two bands. These galaxies typically have very clumpy and extended morphology or are very faint in the V-band.
  • We reconstruct the radial profile of the projected gravitational potential of the galaxy cluster MACS-J1206 from 592 spectroscopic measurements of velocities of cluster members. For doing so, we use a method we have developed recently based on the Richardson-Lucy deprojection algorithm and an inversion of the spherically-symmetric Jeans equation. We find that, within the uncertainties, our reconstruction agrees very well with a potential reconstruction from weak and strong gravitational lensing as well as with a potential obtained from X-ray measurements. In addition, our reconstruction is in good agreement with several common analytic profiles of the lensing potential. Varying the anisotropy parameter in the Jeans equation, we find that isotropy parameters which are either small, $\beta\lesssim0.2$, or decrease with radius yield potential profiles which strongly disagree with that obtained from gravitational lensing. We achieve the best agreement between our potential profile and the profile from gravitational lensing if the anisotropy parameter rises quite steeply to $\beta\approx0. 6$ within $\approx0.5\,\mathrm{Mpc}$ and stays constant further out.
  • The spatial fluctuations of the extragalactic background light trace the total emission from all stars and galaxies in the Universe. A multi-wavelength study can be used to measure the integrated emission from first galaxies during reionization when the Universe was about 500 million years old. Here we report arcminute-scale spatial fluctuations in one of the deepest sky surveys with the Hubble Space Telescope in five wavebands between 0.6 and 1.6 $\mu$m. We model-fit the angular power spectra of intensity fluctuation measurements to find the ultraviolet luminosity density of galaxies at $z$ > 8 to be $\log \rho_{\rm UV} = 27.4^{+0.2}_{-1.2}$ erg s$^{-1}$ Hz$^{-1}$ Mpc$^{-3}$ $(1\sigma)$. This level of integrated light emission allows for a significant surface density of fainter primeval galaxies that are below the point source detection level in current surveys.
  • Using a stellar mass limited sample of $\sim 46,600$ galaxies ($M_* > 10^{9.1}\,M_{\odot}$) at $0.5 < z < 2$, we show that the tellar mass, rather than the environment, is the main parameter controlling quenching of star formation in galaxies with $M_* > 10^{10}\,M_{\odot}$ out to $z=2$. On the other hand, the environmental quenching becomes efficient at $z < 1$ regardless of galaxy mass, and it serves as a main star formation quenching mechanism for lower mass galaxies. Our result is based on deep optical and near-infrared imaging data over 2800 arcmin$^2$, enabling us to negate cosmic variance and identify 46 galaxy cluster candidates with $M \sim 10^{14}\,M_{\odot}$. From $M_* \sim 10^{9.5}$ to $10^{10.5}\,M_{\odot}$, the fraction of quiescent galaxies increases by a factor of $\sim 10$ over the entire redshift range, but the difference between cluster and field environment is negligible. Rapid evolution in the quiescent fraction is seen from $z=2$ to $z=1.3$ for massive galaxies suggesting a build-up of massive quiescent galaxies at $z > 1.3$. For galaxies with $M_* < 10^{10}\,M_{\odot}$ at $z < 1.0$, the quiescent fraction is found to be as much as a factor of 2 larger in clusters than in field, showing the importance of environmental quenching in low mass galaxies at low redshift. Most high mass galaxies are already quenched at $z > 1$, therefore environmental quenching does not play a significant role for them, although the environmental quenching efficiency is nearly identical between high and low mass galaxies.
  • We present profiles of temperature (Tx), gas mass, and hydrostatic mass estimated from new and archival X-ray observations of CLASH clusters. We compare measurements derived from XMM and Chandra observations with one another and compare both to gravitational lensing mass profiles derived with CLASH HST and ground-based lensing data. Radial profiles of Chandra and XMM electron density and enclosed gas mass are nearly identical, indicating that differences in hydrostatic masses inferred from X-ray observations arise from differences in Tx measurements. Encouragingly, cluster Txs are consistent with one another at ~100-200 kpc radii but XMM Tx systematically decline relative to Chandra Tx at larger radii. The angular dependence of the discrepancy suggests additional investigation on systematics such as the XMM point spread function correction, vignetting and off-axis responses. We present the CLASH-X mass-profile comparisons in the form of cosmology-independent and redshift-independent circular-velocity profiles. Ratios of Chandra HSE mass profiles to CLASH lensing profiles show no obvious radial dependence in the 0.3-0.8 Mpc range. However, the mean mass biases inferred from the WL and SaWLens data are different. e.g., the weighted-mean value at 0.5 Mpc is <b> = 0.12 for the WL comparison and <b> = -0.11 for the SaWLens comparison. The ratios of XMM HSE mass profiles to CLASH lensing profiles show a pronounced radial dependence in the 0.3-1.0 Mpc range, with a weighted mean mass bias of value rising to <b>~0.3 at ~1 Mpc for the WL comparison and <b> of 0.25 for SaWLens comparison. The enclosed gas mass profiles from both Chandra and XMM rise to a value 1/8 times the total-mass profiles inferred from lensing at 0.5 Mpc and remain constant outside of that radius, suggesting that [8xMgas] profiles may be an excellent proxy for total-mass profiles at >0.5 Mpc in massive galaxy clusters.
  • Brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) are usually quiescent, but many exhibit star formation. Here we exploit the opportunity provided by rest-frame UV imaging of galaxy clusters in the CLASH (Cluster Lensing and Supernovae with Hubble) Multi-Cycle Treasury Project to reveal the diversity of UV morphologies in BCGs and to compare them with recent simulations of the cool, star-forming gas structures produced by precipitation-driven feedback. All of the CLASH BCGs are detected in the rest-frame UV (280 nm), regardless of their star-formation activity, because evolved stellar populations produce a modest amount of UV light that traces the relatively smooth, symmetric, and centrally peaked stellar distribution seen in the near infrared. Ultraviolet morphologies among the BCGs with strong UV excesses exhibit distinctive knots, multiple elongated clumps, and extended filaments of emission that distinctly differ from the smooth profiles of the UV-quiet BCGs. These structures, which are similar to those seen in the few star-forming BCGs observed in the UV at low redshift, are suggestive of bi-polar streams of clumpy star formation, but not of spiral arms or large, kpc-scale disks. Based on the number of streams and lack of culprit companion galaxies, these streams are unlikely to have arisen from multiple collisions with gas-rich galaxies. These star-forming UV structures are morphologically similar to the cold-gas structures produced in simulations of precipitation-driven AGN feedback in which jets uplift low-entropy gas to greater altitudes, causing it to condense. Unobscured star-formation rates estimated from CLASH UV images using the Kennicutt relation range up to 80 solar masses per year in the most extended and highly structured systems. The circumgalactic gas-entropy threshold for star formation in CLASH BCGs at z~0.2-0.5 is indistinguishable from that for clusters at z < 0.2.
  • We have conducted a detailed object-by-object study of a mass-complete (M*>10^11 M_sun) sample of 56 galaxies at 1.4 < z < 2 in the GOODS-South field, showing that an accurate de-blending in MIPS/24um images is essential to properly assign to each galaxy its own star formation rate (SFR), whereas an automatic procedure often fails. This applies especially to galaxies with SFRs below the Main Sequence (MS) value, which may be in their quenching phase. After that, the sample splits evenly between galaxies forming stars within a factor of 4 of the MS rate (~45%), and sub-MS galaxies with SFRs ~10-1000 times smaller (~55%). We did not find a well defined class of intermediate, transient objects below the MS, suggesting that the conversion of a massive MS galaxy into a quenched remnant may take a relatively short time (<1 Gyr), though a larger sample should be analyzed in the same way to set precise limits on the quenching timescale. X-ray detected AGNs represent a ~30% fraction of the sample, and are found among both star-forming and quenched galaxies. The morphological analysis revealed that ~50% of our massive objects are bulge-dominated, and almost all MS galaxies with a relevant bulge component host an AGN. We also found sub-MS SFRs in many bulge-dominated systems, providing support to the notion that bulge growth, AGN activity and quenching of star formation are closely related to each other.
  • We present results from a comprehensive lensing analysis in HST data, of the complete CLASH cluster sample. We identify new multiple-images previously undiscovered allowing improved or first constraints on the cluster inner mass distributions and profiles. We combine these strong-lensing constraints with weak-lensing shape measurements within the HST FOV to jointly constrain the mass distributions. The analysis is performed in two different common parameterizations (one adopts light-traces-mass for both galaxies and dark matter while the other adopts an analytical, elliptical NFW form for the dark matter), to provide a better assessment of the underlying systematics - which is most important for deep, cluster-lensing surveys, especially when studying magnified high-redshift objects. We find that the typical (median), relative systematic differences throughout the central FOV are $\sim40\%$ in the (dimensionless) mass density, $\kappa$, and $\sim20\%$ in the magnification, $\mu$. We show maps of these differences for each cluster, as well as the mass distributions, critical curves, and 2D integrated mass profiles. For the Einstein radii ($z_{s}=2$) we find that all typically agree within $10\%$ between the two models, and Einstein masses agree, typically, within $\sim15\%$. At larger radii, the total projected, 2D integrated mass profiles of the two models, within $r\sim2\arcmin$, differ by $\sim30\%$. Stacking the surface-density profiles of the sample from the two methods together, we obtain an average slope of $d\log (\Sigma)/d\log(r)\sim-0.64\pm0.1$, in the radial range [5,350] kpc. Lastly, we also characterize the behavior of the average magnification, surface density, and shear differences between the two models, as a function of both the radius from the center, and the best-fit values of these quantities.
  • We utilize the CLASH (Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble) observations of 25 clusters to search for extreme emission-line galaxies (EELGs). The selections are carried out in two central bands: F105W (Y105) and F125W (J125), as the flux of the central bands could be enhanced by the presence of [O III] 4959, 5007 at redshift of about 0.93-1.14 and 1.57-1.79, respectively. The multi-band observations help to constrain the equivalent widths of emission lines. Thanks to cluster lensing, we are able to identify 52 candidates down to an intrinsic limiting magnitude of 28.5 and to a rest-frame [O III] 4959,5007 equivalent width of about 3737 angstrom. Our samples include a number of EELGs at lower luminosities that are missed in other surveys, and the extremely high equivalent width can be only found in such faint galaxies. These EELGs can mimic the dropout feature similar to that of high redshift galaxies and contaminate the color-color selection of high redshift galaxies when the S/N ratio is limited or the band coverage is incomplete. We predict that the fraction of EELGs in the future high redshift galaxy selections cannot be neglected.