• We show how general linear optical quantum entanglement experiments with probabilistic sources can be described using graph theory. By introducing complex weights in undirected graphs, we can naturally work with quantum superpositions. This immediately leads to many interesting results, some of which we present here. Firstly, we identify a conceptually new and experimentally completely unexplored method to solve classically intractable problems with quantum experiments. The problem is in the complexity class #P-complete, and deals with the computation of a generalization of the matrix function Permanent. Second, we show that a recent no-go result applies generally to linear optical quantum experiments, thus revealing important insights to quantum state generation with current photonic technology. Third, we show how to easily understand in a graphical way quantum experiments such as entanglement swapping. This connection offers a novel perspective on a widely used technology, and immediately raises many new questions.
  • Techniques for the distribution of quantum-secured cryptographic keys have reached a level of maturity allowing them to be implemented in all kinds of environments, away from any form of laboratory infrastructure. Here, we detail the distribution of entanglement between Malta and Sicily over a 96 km-long submarine telecommunications optical fibre cable. We used this standard telecommunications fibre as a quantum channel to distribute polarisation-entangled photons and were able to observe around 257 photon pairs per second, with a polarisation visibility above 90%. Our experiment demonstrates the feasibility of using deployed submarine telecommunications optical fibres as long-distance quantum channels for polarisation-entangled photons. This opens up a plethora of possibilities for future experiments and technological applications using existing infrastructure.
  • Beams of light with a large topological charge significantly change their spatial structure when they are focussed strongly. Physically, it can be explained by an emerging electromagnetic field component in the direction of propagation, which is neglected in the simplified scalar wave picture in optics. Here we ask: Is this a specific photonic behavior, or can similar phenomena also be predicted for other species of particles? We show that the exact same phenomenon also exists for relativistic electrons as well as for focused gravitational waves, but for different physical reasons. For electrons, which are described by the Dirac equation, the additional intensity arises from a Spin-Orbit coupling in the relativistic regime. In gravitational waves described with linearized general relativity, the curvature of space-time between the transverse and propagation direction leads to the additional intensity contribution. Thus, this universal phenomenon exists for both massive and massless elementary particles with Spin 1/2, 1 and 2. It would be very interesting whether other types of particles such as composite systems (neutrons or C$_{60}$) or neutrinos show a similar behaviour and how this phenomenon can be explained in a unified physical way.
  • How useful can machine learning be in a quantum laboratory? Here we raise the question of the potential of intelligent machines in the context of scientific research. A major motivation for the present work is the unknown reachability of various entanglement classes in quantum experiments. We investigate this question by using the projective simulation model, a physics-oriented approach to artificial intelligence. In our approach, the projective simulation system is challenged to design complex photonic quantum experiments that produce high-dimensional entangled multiphoton states, which are of high interest in modern quantum experiments. The artificial intelligence system learns to create a variety of entangled states, and improves the efficiency of their realization. In the process, the system autonomously (re)discovers experimental techniques which are only now becoming standard in modern quantum optical experiments - a trait which was not explicitly demanded from the system but emerged through the process of learning. Such features highlight the possibility that machines could have a significantly more creative role in future research.
  • We perform decoy-state quantum key distribution between a low-Earth-orbit satellite and multiple ground stations located in Xinglong, Nanshan, and Graz, which establish satellite-to-ground secure keys with ~kHz rate per passage of the satellite Micius over a ground station. The satellite thus establishes a secure key between itself and, say, Xinglong, and another key between itself and, say, Graz. Then, upon request from the ground command, Micius acts as a trusted relay. It performs bitwise exclusive OR operations between the two keys and relays the result to one of the ground stations. That way, a secret key is created between China and Europe at locations separated by 7600 km on Earth. These keys are then used for intercontinental quantum-secured communication. This was on the one hand the transmission of images in a one-time pad configuration from China to Austria as well as from Austria to China. Also, a videoconference was performed between the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the Chinese Academy of Sciences, which also included a 280 km optical ground connection between Xinglong and Beijing. Our work points towards an efficient solution for an ultralong-distance global quantum network, laying the groundwork for a future quantum internet.
  • Models of quantum systems on curved space-times lack sufficient experimental verification. Some speculative theories suggest that quantum properties, such as entanglement, may exhibit entirely different behavior to purely classical systems. By measuring this effect or lack thereof, we can test the hypotheses behind several such models. For instance, as predicted by Ralph and coworkers [T C Ralph, G J Milburn, and T Downes, Phys. Rev. A, 79(2):22121, 2009, T C Ralph and J Pienaar, New Journal of Physics, 16(8):85008, 2014], a bipartite entangled system could decohere if each particle traversed through a different gravitational field gradient. We propose to study this effect in a ground to space uplink scenario. We extend the above theoretical predictions of Ralph and coworkers and discuss the scientific consequences of detecting/failing to detect the predicted gravitational decoherence. We present a detailed mission design of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Space QUEST (Space - Quantum Entanglement Space Test) mission, and study the feasibility of the mission schema.
  • We present an in principle lossless sorter for radial modes of light, using accumulated Gouy phases. The experimental setups have been found by a computer algorithm, and can be intuitively understood in a geometric way. Together with the ability to sort angular-momentum modes, we now have access to the complete 2-dimensional transverse plane of light. The device can readily be used in multiplexing classical information. On a quantum level, it is an analog of the Stern-Gerlach experiment -- significant for the discussion of fundamental concepts in quantum physics. As such, it can be applied in high-dimensional and multi-photonic quantum experiments.
  • Quantum information science and quantum information technology have seen a virtual explosion world-wide. It is all based on the observation that fundamental quantum phenomena on the individual particle or system-level lead to completely novel ways of encoding, processing and transmitting information. Quantum mechanics, a child of the first third of the 20th century, has found numerous realizations and technical applications, much more than was thought at the beginning. Decades later, it became possible to do experiments with individual quantum particles and quantum systems. This was due to technological progress, and for light in particular, the development of the laser. Hitherto, nearly all experiments and also nearly all realizations in the fields have been performed with qubits, which are two-level quantum systems. We suggest that this limitation is again mainly a technological one, because it is very difficult to create, manipulate and measure more complex quantum systems. Here, we provide a specific overview of some recent developments with higher-dimensional quantum systems. We mainly focus on Orbital Angular Momentum (OAM) states of photons and possible applications in quantum information protocols. Such states form discrete higher-dimensional quantum systems, also called qudits. Specifically, we will first address the question what kind of new fundamental properties exist and the quantum information applications which are opened up by such novel systems. Then we give an overview of recent developments in the field by discussing several notable experiments over the past 2-3 years. Finally, we conclude with several important open questions which will be interesting for investigations in the future.
  • The Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) argument provides an all-or-nothing contradiction between quantum mechanics and local-realistic theories. In its original formulation, GHZ investigated three and four particles entangled in two dimensions only. Very recently, higher dimensional contradictions especially in three dimensions and three particles have been discovered but it has remained unclear how to produce such states. In this article we experimentally show how to generate a three-dimensional GHZ state from two-photon orbital-angular-momentum entanglement. The first suggestion for a setup which generates three-dimensional GHZ entanglement from these entangled pairs came from using the computer algorithm Melvin. The procedure employs novel concepts significantly beyond the qubit case. Our experiment opens up the possibility of a truly high-dimensional test of the GHZ-contradiction which, interestingly, employs non-Hermitian operators.
  • We show that it is possible to generate a novel single-photon fringe pattern by using two spatially separated identical bi-photon sources. The fringes are similar to the ones observed in a Michelson interferometer and possess certain remarkable properties with potential applications. A striking feature of the fringes is that although the pattern is obtained by detecting only one photon of each photon pair, the fringes shift due to a change in the optical path traversed by the undetected photon. The fringe shift is characterized by a combination of wavelengths of both photons, which implies that the wavelength of a photon can be measured without detecting it. Furthermore, the visibility of the fringes diminishes as the correlation between the transverse momenta of twin photons decreases: visibility is unity for maximum momentum correlation and zero for no momentum correlation. We also show that the momentum correlation between the two photons of a pair can be determined from the single-photon interference pattern. We thus for the first time propose a method of measuring a two-photon correlation without coincidence or heralded detection.
  • The Bell basis is a distinctive set of maximally entangled two-particle quantum states that forms the foundation for many quantum protocols such as teleportation, dense coding and entanglement swapping. While the generation, manipulation, and measurement of two-level quantum states is well understood, the same is not true in higher dimensions. Here we present the experimental generation of a complete set of Bell states in a four-dimensional Hilbert space, comprising of 16 orthogonal entangled Bell-like states encoded in the orbital angular momentum of photons. The states are created by the application of generalized high-dimensional Pauli gates on an initial entangled state. Our results pave the way for the application of high-dimensional quantum states in complex quantum protocols such as quantum dense coding.
  • We introduce unitary quantum gates for photon pair creation in spontaneous parametric down-conversion nonlinear crystals (NLs) and for photon path alignment. These are the two key ingredients for the method of "induced coherence without induced emission" and many ensuing variations thereof. The difficulty in doing so stems from an apparent mixing of the mode picture (such as the polarization of photons) and the Fock picture (such as the existence of the photons). We illustrate utility of these gates by obtaining quantum circuits for the experimental setups of the frustrated generation of photon pairs, identification of a point-like object with undetected photons, and creation of a Bell state. We also introduce an effective nonunitary description for the action of NLs in experiments where all the NLs are pumped coherently. As an example, by using this simplifying picture, we show how NLs can be used to create superposition of given quantum states in a modular fashion.
  • We show a surprising link between experimental setups to realize high-dimensional multipartite quantum states and Graph Theory. In these setups, the paths of photons are identified such that the photon-source information is never created. We find that each of these setups correspond to an undirected graph, and every undirected graph corresponds to an experimental setup. Every term in the emerging quantum superposition corresponds to a perfect matching in the grpah. Calculating the final quantum state is in the complexity class #P-complete, thus cannot be done efficiently. To strengthen the link further, theorems from Graph Theory -- such as Hall's marriage problem -- are rephrased in the language of pair creation in quantum experiments. This link allows to answer questions about quantum experiments (such as which classes of entangled states can be created) with graph theoretical methods, and potentially simulate problems in Graph Theory with quantum experiments.
  • Transformations on quantum states form a basic building block of every quantum information system. From photonic polarization to two-level atoms, complete sets of quantum gates for a variety of qubit systems are well known. For multi-level quantum systems beyond qubits, the situation is more challenging. The orbital angular momentum modes of photons comprise one such high-dimensional system for which generation and measurement techniques are well-studied. However, arbitrary transformations for such quantum states are not known. Here we experimentally demonstrate a four-dimensional generalization of the Pauli X-gate and all of its integer powers on single photons carrying orbital angular momentum. Together with the well-known Z-gate, this forms the first complete set of high-dimensional quantum gates implemented experimentally. The concept of the X-gate is based on independent access to quantum states with different parities and can thus be easily generalized to other photonic degrees-of-freedom, as well as to other quantum systems such as ions and superconducting circuits.
  • Quantum entanglement is one of the most prominent features of quantum mechanics and forms the basis of quantum information technologies. Here we present a novel method for the creation of quantum entanglement in multipartite and high-dimensional systems. The two ingredients are 1) superposition of photon pairs with different origins and 2) aligning photons such that their paths are identical. We explain the experimentally feasible creation of various classes of multiphoton entanglement encoded in polarization as well as in high-dimensional Hilbert spaces -- starting only from non-entangled photon pairs. For two photons, arbitrary high-dimensional entanglement can be created. The idea of generating entanglement by path identity could also apply to other quantum entities than photons. We discovered the technique by analyzing the output of a computer algorithm. This shows that computer designed quantum experiments can be inspirations for new techniques.
  • Bell's theorem states that some predictions of quantum mechanics cannot be reproduced by a local-realist theory. That conflict is expressed by Bell's inequality, which is usually derived under the assumption that there are no statistical correlations between the choices of measurement settings and anything else that can causally affect the measurement outcomes. In previous experiments, this "freedom of choice" was addressed by ensuring that selection of measurement settings via conventional "quantum random number generators" was space-like separated from the entangled particle creation. This, however, left open the possibility that an unknown cause affected both the setting choices and measurement outcomes as recently as mere microseconds before each experimental trial. Here we report on a new experimental test of Bell's inequality that, for the first time, uses distant astronomical sources as "cosmic setting generators." In our tests with polarization-entangled photons, measurement settings were chosen using real-time observations of Milky Way stars while simultaneously ensuring locality. Assuming fair sampling for all detected photons, and that each stellar photon's color was set at emission, we observe statistically significant $\gtrsim 7.31 \sigma$ and $\gtrsim 11.93 \sigma$ violations of Bell's inequality with estimated $p$-values of $ \lesssim 1.8 \times 10^{-13}$ and $\lesssim 4.0 \times 10^{-33}$, respectively, thereby pushing back by $\sim$600 years the most recent time by which any local-realist influences could have engineered the observed Bell violation.
  • The phenomenon of molecular optical activity manifests itself as the rotation of the plane of linear polarization when light passes through chiral media. Measurements of optical activity and its wavelength dependence, optical rotatory dispersion, can reveal information about intricate properties of molecules, such as the 3D arrangement of atoms comprising a molecule. Given a limited probe power, quantum metrology offers the possibility to outperform classical measurements. This holds particular appeal when samples may be damaged by high powers, a potential concern for chiroptical studies. Here we show the first experiment in which multi-wavelength polarization-entangled photon pairs are used to measure the optical activity and optical rotatory dispersion exhibited by a solution of chiral molecules. Our work paves the way for quantum-enhanced measurements of chirality, with potential applications in chemistry, biology, materials science, and the pharmaceutical industry. The scheme we employ for probing the wavelength dependence allows to surpass the information extracted per photon in a classical measurement, and can also be used for more general differential measurements.
  • The secure communication of information plays an ever increasing role in our society today. Classical methods of encryption inherently rely on the difficulty of solving a problem such as finding prime factors of large numbers and can, in principle, be cracked by a fast enough machine. The burgeoning field of quantum communication relies on the fundamental laws of physics to offer unconditional information security. Here we introduce the key concepts of quantum superposition and entanglement as well as the no-cloning theorem that form the basis of this field. Then, we review basic quantum communication schemes with single and entangled photons and discuss recent experimental progress in ground and space-based quantum communication. Finally, we discuss the emerging field of high-dimensional quantum communication, which promises increased data rates and higher levels of security than ever before. We discuss recent experiments that use the orbital angular momentum of photons for sharing large amounts of information in a secure fashion.
  • We report a measurement of the transverse momentum correlation between two photons by detecting only one of them. Our method uses two identical sources in an arrangement, in which the phenomenon of induced coherence without induced emission is observed. In this way, we produce an interference pattern in the superposition of one beam from each source. We quantify the transverse momentum correlation by analyzing the visibility of this pattern. Our approach might be useful for the characterization of correlated photon pair sources and may lead to an experimental measure of continuous variable entanglement, which relies on the detection of only one of two entangled particles.
  • We observe spatial fringes in the interference of two beams, which are controlled by a third beam through the phenomenon of induced coherence without induced emission. We show that the interference pattern depends on the alignment of this beam in an analogous way as fringes created in a traditional division-of-amplitude interferometer depend on the relative alignment of the two interfering beams. We demonstrate that the pattern is characterized by an equivalent wavelength, which corresponds to a combination of the wavelengths of the involved physical light beams.
  • The identification of orbital angular momentum (OAM) as a fundamental property of a beam of light nearly twenty-five years ago has led to an extensive body of research around this topic. The possibility that single photons can carry OAM has made this degree of freedom an ideal candidate for the investigation of complex quantum phenomena and their applications. Research in this direction has ranged from experiments on complex forms of quantum entanglement to the interaction between light and quantum states of matter. Furthermore, the use of OAM in quantum information has generated a lot of excitement, as it allows for encoding large amounts of information on a single photon. Here we explain the intuition that led to the first quantum experiment with OAM fifteen years ago. We continue by reviewing some key experiments investigating fundamental questions on photonic OAM and the first steps into applying these properties in novel quantum protocols. In the end, we identify several interesting open questions that could form the subject of future investigations with OAM.
  • Photons with a twisted phase front carry a quantized amount of orbital angular momentum (OAM) and have become important in various fields of optics, such as quantum and classical information science or optical tweezers. Because no upper limit on the OAM content per photon is known, they are also interesting systems to experimentally challenge quantum mechanical prediction for high quantum numbers. Here, we take advantage of a recently developed technique to imprint unprecedented high values of OAM, namely spiral phase mirrors (SPM), to generate photons with more than 10,000 quanta of OAM. Moreover, we demonstrate quantum entanglement between these large OAM quanta of one photon and the polarization of its partner photon. To our knowledge, this corresponds to entanglement with the largest quantum number that has been demonstrated in an experiment. The results may also open novel ways to couple single photons to massive objects, enhance angular resolution and highlight OAM as a promising way to increase the information capacity of a single photon.
  • Spatial modes of light can potentially carry a vast amount of information, making them promising candidates for both classical and quantum communication. However, the distribution of such modes over large distances remains difficult. Intermodal coupling complicates their use with common fibers, while free-space transmission is thought to be strongly influenced by atmospheric turbulence. Here we show the transmission of orbital angular momentum modes of light over a distance of 143 kilometers between two Canary Islands, which is 50 times greater than the maximum distance achieved previously. As a demonstration of the transmission quality, we use superpositions of these modes to encode a short message. At the receiver, an artificial neural network is used for distinguishing between the different twisted light superpositions. The algorithm is able to identify different mode superpositions with an accuracy of more than 80% up to the third mode order, and decode the transmitted message with an error rate of 8.33%. Using our data, we estimate that the distribution of orbital angular momentum entanglement over more than 100 kilometers of free space is feasible. Moreover, the quality of our free-space link can be further improved by the use of state-of-the-art adaptive optics systems.
  • In addition to being a workhorse for modern quantum technologies, entanglement plays a key role in fundamental tests of quantum mechanics. The entanglement of photons in multiple levels, or dimensions, explores the limits of how large an entangled state can be, while also greatly expanding its applications in quantum information. Here we show how a high-dimensional quantum state of two photons entangled in their orbital angular momentum can be split into two entangled states with a smaller dimensionality structure. Our work demonstrates that entanglement is a quantum property that can be subdivided into spatially separated parts. In addition, our technique has vast potential applications in quantum as well as classical communication systems.
  • The wave-particle duality dates back to Einstein's explanation of the photoelectric effect through quanta of light and de Broglie's hypothesis of matter waves. Quantum mechanics uses an abstract description for the behavior of physical systems such as photons, electrons, or atoms. Whether quantum predictions for single systems in an interferometric experiment allow an intuitive understanding in terms of the particle or wave picture, depends on the specific configuration which is being used. In principle, this leaves open the possibility that quantum systems always either behave definitely as a particle or definitely as a wave in every experimental run by a priori adapting to the specific experimental situation. This is precisely what is tried to be excluded by delayed-choice experiments, in which the observer chooses to reveal the particle or wave character -- or even a continuous transformation between the two -- of a quantum system at a late stage of the experiment. We review the history of delayed-choice gedanken experiments, which can be traced back to the early days of quantum mechanics. Then we discuss their experimental realizations, in particular Wheeler's delayed choice in interferometric setups as well as delayed-choice quantum erasure and entanglement swapping. The latter is particularly interesting, because it elevates the wave-particle duality of a single quantum system to an entanglement-separability duality of multiple systems.