• We present two distributed methods for the estimation of the kinematic parameters, the dynamic parameters, and the kinematic state of an unknown planar body manipulated by a decentralized multi-agent system. The proposed approaches rely on the rigid body kinematics and dynamics, on nonlinear observation theory, and on consensus algorithms. The only three requirements are that each agent can exert a 2D wrench on the load, it can measure the velocity of its contact point, and that the communication graph is connected. Both theoretical nonlinear observability analysis and convergence proofs are provided. The first method assumes constant parameters while the second one can deal with time-varying parameters and can be applied in parallel to any task-oriented control law. For the cases in which a control law is not provided, we propose a distributed and safe control strategy satisfying the observability condition. The effectiveness and robustness of the estimation strategy is showcased by means of realistic MonteCarlo simulations.
  • In this paper, we prove that the dynamical model of a quadrotor subject to linear rotor drag effects is differentially flat in its position and heading. We use this property to compute feed-forward control terms directly from a reference trajectory to be tracked. The obtained feed-forward terms are then used in a cascaded, nonlinear feedback control law that enables accurate agile flight with quadrotors. Compared to state-of-the-art control methods, which treat the rotor drag as an unknown disturbance, our method reduces the trajectory tracking error significantly. Finally, we present a method based on a gradient-free optimization to identify the rotor drag coefficients, which are required to compute the feed-forward control terms. The new theoretical results are thoroughly validated trough extensive comparative experiments.
  • In this paper, we define a general class of abstract aerial robotic systems named Laterally Bounded Force (LBF) vehicles, in which most of the control authority is expressed along a principal thrust direction, while in the lateral directions a (smaller and possibly null) force may be exploited to achieve full-pose tracking. This class approximates well platforms endowed with non-coplanar/non-collinear rotors that can use the tilted propellers to slightly change the orientation of the total thrust w.r.t. the body frame. For this broad class of systems, we introduce a new geometric control strategy in SE(3) to achieve, whenever made possible by the force constraints, the independent tracking of position-plus-orientation trajectories. The exponential tracking of a feasible full-pose reference trajectory is proven using a Lyapunov technique in SE(3). The method can deal seamlessly with both under- and fully-actuated LBF platforms. The controller guarantees the tracking of at least the positional part in the case that an unfeasible full-pose reference trajectory is provided. The paper provides several experimental tests clearly showing the practicability of the approach and the sharp improvement with respect to state of-the-art approaches.
  • This paper presents a novel decentralized control strategy for a multi-robot system that enables parallel multi-target exploration while ensuring a time-varying connected topology in cluttered 3D environments. Flexible continuous connectivity is guaranteed by building upon a recent connectivity maintenance method, in which limited range, line-of-sight visibility, and collision avoidance are taken into account at the same time. Completeness of the decentralized multi-target exploration algorithm is guaranteed by dynamically assigning the robots with different motion behaviors during the exploration task. One major group is subject to a suitable downscaling of the main traveling force based on the traveling efficiency of the current leader and the direction alignment between traveling and connectivity force. This supports the leader in always reaching its current target and, on a larger time horizon, that the whole team realizes the overall task in finite time. Extensive Monte~Carlo simulations with a group of several quadrotor UAVs show the scalability and effectiveness of the proposed method and experiments validate its practicability.
  • We consider the problem of controlling an aerial robot connected to the ground by a passive cable or a passive rigid link. We provide a thorough characterization of this nonlinear dynamical robotic system in terms of fundamental properties such as differential flatness, controllability, and observability. We prove that the robotic system is differentially flat with respect to two output pairs: elevation of the link and attitude of the vehicle; elevation of the link and longitudinal link force (e.g., cable tension, or bar compression). We show the design of an almost globally convergent nonlinear observer of the full state that resorts only to an onboard accelerometer and a gyroscope. We also design two almost globally convergent nonlinear controllers to track any sufficiently smooth time-varying trajectory of the two output pairs. Finally we numerically test the robustness of the proposed method in several far-from-nominal conditions: nonlinear cross-coupling effects, parameter deviations, measurements noise and non ideal actuators.
  • In this paper we present a maneuver regulation scheme for Vertical Take-Off and Landing (VTOL) micro aerial vehicles (MAV). Differently from standard trajectory tracking, maneuver regulation has an intrinsic robustness due to the fact that the vehicle is not required to chase a virtual target, but just to stay on a (properly designed) desired path with a given velocity profile. In this paper we show how a robust maneuver regulation controller can be easily designed by converting an existing tracking scheme. The resulting maneuvering controller has three main appealing features, namely it: (i) inherits the robustness properties of the tracking controller, (ii) gains the appealing features of maneuver regulation, and (iii) does not need any additional tuning with respect to the tracking controller. We prove the correctness of the proposed scheme and show its effectiveness in experiments on a nano-quadrotor. In particular, we show on a nontrivial maneuver how external disturbances acting on the quadrotor cause instabilities in the standard tracking, while marginally affect the maneuver regulation scheme.
  • The goal of this work is to propose an extension of the popular leader-follower framework for multi-agent collective tracking and formation maintenance in presence of a time- varying leader. In particular, the leader is persistently selected online so as to optimize the tracking performance of an exogenous collective velocity command while also maintaining a desired formation via a (possibly time-varying) communication-graph topology. The effects of a change in the leader identity are theoretically analyzed and exploited for defining a suitable error metric able to capture the tracking performance of the multi- agent group. Both the group performance and the metric design are found to depend upon the spectral properties of a special directed graph induced by the identity of the chosen leader. By exploiting these results, as well as distributed estimation techniques, we are then able to detail a fully-decentralized adaptive strategy able to periodically select online the best leader among the neighbors of the current leader. Numerical simulations show that the application of the proposed technique results in an improvement of the overall performance of the group behavior w.r.t. other possible strategies.
  • We present a control framework for achieving encirclement of a target moving in 3D using a multi-robot system. Three variations of a basic control strategy are proposed for different versions of the encirclement problem, and their effectiveness is formally established. An extension ensuring maintenance of a safe inter-robot distance is also discussed. The proposed framework is fully decentralized and only requires local communication among robots; in particular, each robot locally estimates all the relevant global quantities. We validate the proposed strategy through simulations on kinematic point robots and quadrotor UAVs, as well as experiments on differential-drive wheeled mobile robots.
  • This work proposes a fully decentralized strategy for maintaining the formation rigidity of a multi-robot system using only range measurements, while still allowing the graph topology to change freely over time. In this direction, a first contribution of this work is an extension of rigidity theory to weighted frameworks and the rigidity eigenvalue, which when positive ensures the infinitesimal rigidity of the framework. We then propose a distributed algorithm for estimating a common relative position reference frame amongst a team of robots with only range measurements in addition to one agent endowed with the capability of measuring the bearing to two other agents. This first estimation step is embedded into a subsequent distributed algorithm for estimating the rigidity eigenvalue associated with the weighted framework. The estimate of the rigidity eigenvalue is finally used to generate a local control action for each agent that both maintains the rigidity property and enforces additional con- straints such as collision avoidance and sensing/communication range limits and occlusions. As an additional feature of our approach, the communication and sensing links among the robots are also left free to change over time while preserving rigidity of the whole framework. The proposed scheme is then experimentally validated with a robotic testbed consisting of 6 quadrotor UAVs operating in a cluttered environment.
  • This work considers the problem of estimating the unscaled relative positions of a multi-robot team in a common reference frame from bearing-only measurements. Each robot has access to a relative bearing measurement taken from the local body frame of the robot, and the robots have no knowledge of a common or inertial reference frame. A corresponding extension of rigidity theory is made for frameworks embedded in the \emph{special Euclidean group} $SE(2) = \mathbb{R}^2 \times \mathcal{S}^1$. We introduce definitions describing rigidity for $SE(2)$ frameworks and provide necessary and sufficient conditions for when such a framework is \emph{infinitesimally rigid} in $SE(2)$. Analogous to the rigidity matrix for point formations, we introduce the \emph{directed bearing rigidity matrix} and show that an $SE(2)$ framework is infinitesimally rigid if and only if the rank of this matrix is equal to $2|\mathcal{V}|-4$, where $|\mathcal{V}|$ is the number of agents in the ensemble. The directed bearing rigidity matrix and its properties are then used in the implementation and convergence proof of a distributed estimator to determine the {unscaled}{} relative positions in a common frame. Some simulation results are also given to support the analysis.
  • The subject of this work is the patrolling of an environment with the aid of a team of autonomous agents. We consider both the design of open-loop trajectories with optimal properties, and of distributed control laws converging to optimal trajectories. As performance criteria, the refresh time and the latency are considered, i.e., respectively, time gap between any two visits of the same region, and the time necessary to inform every agent about an event occurred in the environment. We associate a graph with the environment, and we study separately the case of a chain, tree, and cyclic graph. For the case of chain graph, we first describe a minimum refresh time and latency team trajectory, and we propose a polynomial time algorithm for its computation. Then, we describe a distributed procedure that steers the robots toward an optimal trajectory. For the case of tree graph, a polynomial time algorithm is developed for the minimum refresh time problem, under the technical assumption of a constant number of robots involved in the patrolling task. Finally, we show that the design of a minimum refresh time trajectory for a cyclic graph is NP-hard, and we develop a constant factor approximation algorithm.