• We study rewritability of monadic disjunctive Datalog programs, (the complements of) MMSNP sentences, and ontology-mediated queries (OMQs) based on expressive description logics of the ALC family and on conjunctive queries. We show that rewritability into FO and into monadic Datalog (MDLog) are decidable, and that rewritability into Datalog is decidable when the original query satisfies a certain condition related to equality. We establish 2NExpTime-completeness for all studied problems except rewritability into MDLog for which there remains a gap between 2NExpTime and 3ExpTime. We also analyze the shape of rewritings, which in the MMSNP case correspond to obstructions, and give a new construction of canonical Datalog programs that is more elementary than existing ones and also applies to formulas with free variables.
  • We develop first-order logic and some extensions for incomplete information scenarios and consider related complexity issues.
  • It was recently shown by van den Broeck at al. that the symmetric weighted first-order model counting problem (WFOMC) for sentences of two-variable logic FO2 is in polynomial time, while it is Sharp-P_1 complete for some FO3-sentences. We extend the result for FO2 in two independent directions: to sentences of the form "phi and \forall\exists^=1 psi" with phi and psi in FO2, and to sentences formulated in the uniform one-dimensional fragment of FO, a recently introduced extension of two-variable logic with the capacity to deal with relation symbols of all arities. Note that the former generalizes the extension of FO2 with a functional relation symbol. We also identify a complete classification of first-order prefix classes according to whether WFOMC is in polynomial time or Sharp-P_1 complete.
  • We investigate the computational complexity of the satisfiability problem of modal inclusion logic. We distinguish two variants of the problem: one for the strict and another one for the lax semantics. Both problems turn out to be EXPTIME-complete on general structures. Finally, we show how for a specific class of structures NEXPTIME-completeness for these problems under strict semantics can be achieved.
  • We study pure coordination games where in every outcome, all players have identical payoffs, 'win' or 'lose'. We identify and discuss a range of 'purely rational principles' guiding the reasoning of rational players in such games and analyze which classes of coordination games can be solved by such players with no preplay communication or conventions. We observe that it is highly nontrivial to delineate a boundary between purely rational principles and other decision methods, such as conventions, for solving such coordination games.
  • We investigate the decidability of the emptiness problem for three classes of distributed automata. These devices operate on finite directed graphs, acting as networks of identical finite-state machines that communicate in an infinite sequence of synchronous rounds. The problem is shown to be decidable in LogSpace for a class of forgetful automata, where the nodes see the messages received from their neighbors but cannot remember their own state. When restricted to the appropriate families of graphs, these forgetful automata are equivalent to classical finite word automata, but strictly more expressive than finite tree automata. On the other hand, we also show that the emptiness problem is undecidable in general. This already holds for two heavily restricted classes of distributed automata: those that reject immediately if they receive more than one message per round, and those whose state diagram must be acyclic except for self-loops.
  • We define a semantics for first-order logic with generalized quantifiers based on double teams. We also define and investigate a notion of a generalized atom. Such atoms can be used in order to define extensions of first-order logic with a team-based semantics. We also define a game semantics and compare it with the double team semantics.
  • We introduce a new game-theoretic semantics (GTS) for the modal mu-calculus. Our so-called bounded GTS replaces parity games with novel alternative evaluation games where only finite paths arise. Infinite paths are not needed even when the considered transition system is infinite.
  • We introduce versions of game-theoretic semantics (GTS) for Alternating-Time Temporal Logic (ATL). In GTS, truth is defined in terms of existence of a winning strategy in a semantic evaluation game, and thus the game-theoretic perspective appears in the framework of ATL on two semantic levels: on the object level in the standard semantics of the strategic operators, and on the meta-level where game-theoretic logical semantics is applied to ATL. We unify these two perspectives into semantic evaluation games specially designed for ATL. The game-theoretic perspective enables us to identify new variants of the semantics of ATL based on limiting the time resources available to the verifier and falsifier in the semantic evaluation game. We introduce and analyse an unbounded and (ordinal) bounded GTS and prove these to be equivalent to the standard (Tarski-style) compositional semantics. We show that in these both versions of GTS, truth of ATL formulae can always be determined in finite time, i.e., without constructing infinite paths. We also introduce a non-equivalent finitely bounded semantics and argue that it is natural from both logical and game-theoretic perspectives.
  • Propositional and modal inclusion logic are formalisms that belong to the family of logics based on team semantics. This article investigates the model checking and validity problems of these logics. We identify complexity bounds for both problems, covering both lax and strict team semantics. By doing so, we come close to finalising the programme that ultimately aims to classify the complexities of the central reasoning problems for modal and propositional dependence, independence, and inclusion logics.
  • We develop game-theoretic semantics (GTS) for the fragment ATL+ of the full Alternating-time Temporal Logic ATL*, essentially extending a recently introduced GTS for ATL. We first show that the new game-theoretic semantics is equivalent to the standard semantics of ATL+ (based on perfect recall strategies). We then provide an analysis, based on the new semantics, of the memory and time resources needed for model checking ATL+. Based on that, we establish that strategies that use only a very limited amount of memory suffice for ATL+. Furthermore, using the GTS we provide a new algorithm for model checking of ATL+ and identify a natural hierarchy of tractable fragments of ATL+ that extend ATL.
  • This paper investigates formal logics for reasoning about determinacy and independence. Propositional Dependence Logic D and Propositional Independence Logic I are recently developed logical systems, based on team semantics, that provide a framework for such reasoning tasks. We introduce two new logics L_D and L_I, based on Kripke semantics, and propose them as alternatives for D and I, respectively. We analyze the relative expressive powers of these four logics and discuss the way these systems relate to natural language. We argue that L_D and L_I naturally resolve a range of interpretational problems that arise in D and I. We also obtain sound and complete axiomatizations for L_D and L_I.
  • We study the complexity of predicate logics based on team semantics. We show that the satisfiability problems of two-variable independence logic and inclusion logic are both NEXPTIME-complete. Furthermore, we show that the validity problem of two-variable dependence logic is undecidable, thereby solving an open problem from the team semantics literature. We also briefly analyse the complexity of the Bernays-Sch\"onfinkel-Ramsey prefix classes of dependence logic.
  • The uniform one-dimensional fragment of first-order logic, U1, is a recently introduced formalism that extends two-variable logic in a natural way to contexts with relations of all arities. We survey properties of U1 and investigate its relationship to description logics designed to accommodate higher arity relations, with particular attention given to DLR_reg. We also define a description logic version of a variant of U1 and prove a range of new results concerning the expressivity of U1 and related logics.
  • Uniform one-dimensional fragment UF1^= is a formalism obtained from first-order logic by limiting quantification to applications of blocks of existential (universal) quantifiers such that at most one variable remains free in the quantified formula. The fragment is closed under Boolean operations, but additional restrictions (called uniformity conditions) apply to combinations of atomic formulas with two or more variables. The fragment can be seen as a canonical generalization of two-variable logic, defined in order to be able to deal with relations of arbitrary arities. The fragment was introduced recently, and it was shown that the satisfiability problem of the equality-free fragment of UF1^= is decidable. In this article we establish that the satisfiability and finite satisfiability problems of UF1^= are NEXPTIME-complete. We also show that the corresponding problems for the extension of UF1^= with counting quantifiers are undecidable. In addition to decidability questions, we compare the expressivities of UF1^= and two-variable logic with counting quantifiers FOC^2. We show that while the logics are incomparable in general, UF1^= is strictly contained in FOC^2 when attention is restricted to vocabularies with the arity bound two.
  • The immediate past has witnessed an increased amount of interest in local algorithms, i.e., constant time distributed algorithms. In a recent survey of the topic (Suomela, ACM Computing Surveys, 2013), it is argued that local algorithms provide a natural framework that could be used in order to theoretically control infinite networks in finite time. We study a comprehensive collection of distributed computing models and prove that if infinite networks are included in the class of structures investigated, then every universally halting distributed algorithm is in fact a local algorithm. To contrast this result, we show that if only finite networks are allowed, then even very weak distributed computing models can define nonlocal algorithms that halt everywhere. The investigations in this article continue the studies in the intersection of logic and distributed computing initiated in (Hella et al., PODC 2012) and (Kuusisto, CSL 2013).
  • We introduce a natural Turing-complete extension of first-order logic FO. The extension adds two novel features to FO. The first one of these is the capacity to add new points to models and new tuples to relations. The second one is the possibility of recursive looping when a formula is evaluated using a semantic game. We first define a game-theoretic semantics for the logic and then prove that the expressive power of the logic corresponds in a canonical way to the recognition capacity of Turing machines. Finally, we show how to incorporate generalized quantifiers into the logic and argue for a highly natural connection between oracles and generalized quantifiers.
  • It is well known that dependence logic captures the complexity class NP, and it has recently been shown that inclusion logic captures P on ordered models. These results demonstrate that team semantics offers interesting new possibilities for descriptive complexity theory. In order to properly understand the connection between team semantics and descriptive complexity, we introduce an extension D* of dependence logic that can define exactly all recursively enumerable classes of finite models. Thus D* provides an approach to computation alternative to Turing machines. The essential novel feature in D* is an operator that can extend the domain of the considered model by a finite number of fresh elements. Due to the close relationship between generalized quantifiers and oracles, we also investigate generalized quantifiers in team semantics. We show that monotone quantifiers of type (1) can be canonically eliminated from quantifier extensions of first-order logic by introducing corresponding generalized dependence atoms.
  • We introduce a novel decidable fragment of first-order logic. The fragment is one-dimensional in the sense that quantification is limited to applications of blocks of existential (universal) quantifiers such that at most one variable remains free in the quantified formula. The fragment is closed under Boolean operations, but additional restrictions (called uniformity conditions) apply to combinations of atomic formulae with two or more variables. We argue that the notions of one-dimensionality and uniformity together offer a novel perspective on the robust decidability of modal logics. We also establish that minor modifications to the restrictions of the syntax of the one-dimensional fragment lead to undecidable formalisms. Namely, the two-dimensional and non-uniform one-dimensional fragments are shown undecidable. Finally, we prove that with regard to expressivity, the one-dimensional fragment is incomparable with both the guarded negation fragment and two-variable logic with counting. Our proof of the decidability of the one-dimensional fragment is based on a technique involving a direct reduction to the monadic class of first-order logic. The novel technique is itself of an independent mathematical interest.
  • Tarski initiated a logic-based approach to formal geometry that studies first-order structures with a ternary betweenness relation \beta, and a quaternary equidistance relation \equiv. Tarski established, inter alia, that the first-order (FO) theory of (R^2,\beta,\equiv) is decidable. Aiello and van Benthem (2002) conjectured that the FO-theory of expansions of (R^2,\beta) with unary predicates is decidable. We refute this conjecture by showing that for all n>1, the FO-theory of the class of expansions of (R^2,\beta) with just one unary predicate is not even arithmetical. We also define a natural and comprehensive class C of geometric structures (T,\beta), and show that for each structure (T,\beta) in C, the FO-theory of the class of expansions of (T,\beta) with a single unary predicate is undecidable. We then consider classes of expansions of structures (T,\beta) with a restricted unary predicate, for example a finite predicate, and establish a variety of related undecidability results. In addition to decidability questions, we briefly study the expressivities of universal MSO and weak universal MSO over expansions of (R^n,\beta). While the logics are incomparable in general, over expansions of (R^n,\beta), formulae of weak universal MSO translate into equivalent formulae of universal MSO.
  • This work presents a classification of weak models of distributed computing. We focus on deterministic distributed algorithms, and study models of computing that are weaker versions of the widely-studied port-numbering model. In the port-numbering model, a node of degree d receives messages through d input ports and sends messages through d output ports, both numbered with 1,2,...,d. In this work, VVc is the class of all graph problems that can be solved in the standard port-numbering model. We study the following subclasses of VVc: VV: Input port i and output port i are not necessarily connected to the same neighbour. MV: Input ports are not numbered; algorithms receive a multiset of messages. SV: Input ports are not numbered; algorithms receive a set of messages. VB: Output ports are not numbered; algorithms send the same message to all output ports. MB: Combination of MV and VB. SB: Combination of SV and VB. Now we have many trivial containment relations, such as SB \subseteq MB \subseteq VB \subseteq VV \subseteq VVc, but it is not obvious if, for example, either of VB \subseteq SV or SV \subseteq VB should hold. Nevertheless, it turns out that we can identify a linear order on these classes. We prove that SB \subsetneq MB = VB \subsetneq SV = MV = VV \subsetneq VVc. The same holds for the constant-time versions of these classes. We also show that the constant-time variants of these classes can be characterised by a corresponding modal logic. Hence the linear order identified in this work has direct implications in the study of the expressibility of modal logic. Conversely, one can use tools from modal logic to study these classes.
  • Tarski initiated a logic-based approach to formal geometry that studies first-order structures with a ternary betweenness relation (\beta) and a quaternary equidistance relation (\equiv). Tarski established, inter alia, that the first-order (FO) theory of (R^2,\beta,\equiv) is decidable. Aiello and van Benthem (2002) conjectured that the FO-theory of expansions of (R^2,\beta) with unary predicates is decidable. We refute this conjecture by showing that for all n>1, the FO-theory of monadic expansions of (R^2,\beta) is \Pi^1_1-hard and therefore not even arithmetical. We also define a natural and comprehensive class C of geometric structures (T,\beta), where T is a subset of R^2, and show that for each structure (T,\beta) in C, the FO-theory of the class of monadic expansions of (T,\beta) is undecidable. We then consider classes of expansions of structures (T,\beta) with restricted unary predicates, for example finite predicates, and establish a variety of related undecidability results. In addition to decidability questions, we briefly study the expressivity of universal MSO and weak universal MSO over expansions of (R^n,\beta). While the logics are incomparable in general, over expansions of (R^n,\beta), formulae of weak universal MSO translate into equivalent formulae of universal MSO. This is an extended version of a publication in the proceedings of the 21st EACSL Annual Conferences on Computer Science Logic (CSL 2012).
  • We study the two-variable fragments D^2 and IF^2 of dependence logic and independence-friendly logic. We consider the satisfiability and finite satisfiability problems of these logics and show that for D^2, both problems are NEXPTIME-complete, whereas for IF^2, the problems are undecidable. We also show that D^2 is strictly less expressive than IF^2 and that already in D^2, equicardinality of two unary predicates and infinity can be expressed (the latter in the presence of a constant symbol). This is an extended version of a publication in the proceedings of the 26th Annual IEEE Symposium on Logic in Computer Science (LICS 2011).