• In the presence of multiscale dynamics in a reaction network, direct simulation methods become inefficient as they can only advance the system on the smallest scale. This work presents stochastic averaging techniques to accelerate computations for obtaining estimates of expected values and sensitivities with respect to the steady state distribution. A two-time-scale formulation is used to establish bounds on the bias induced by the averaging method. Further, this formulation provides a framework to create an accelerated `averaged' version of most single-scale sensitivity estimation method. In particular, we propose a new lower-variance ergodic likelihood ratio type estimator for steady-state estimation and show how one can adapt it to accelerated simulations of multiscale systems.Lastly, we develop an adaptive "batch-means" stopping rule for determining when to terminate the micro-equilibration process.
  • This paper proposes a control algorithm for a UAV to circumnavigate an unknown target at a fixed radius when the location information of the UAV is unavailable. By assuming that the UAV has a constant velocity, the control algorithm makes adjustments to the heading angle of the UAV based on range and range rate measurements from the target, which may be corrupted by additive measurement noise. The control algorithm has the added benefit of being globally smooth and bounded. Exploiting the relationship between range rate and bearing angle, we transform the system dynamics from Cartesian coordinate in terms of location and heading to polar coordinate in terms of range and bearing angle. We then formulate the addition of measurement errors as a stochastic differential equation. A recurrence result is established showing that the UAV will reach a neighborhood of the desired orbit in finite time. Some statistical measures of performance are obtained to support the technical analysis.
  • Motivated by reduction of computational complexity, this work develops sign-error adaptive filtering algorithms for estimating time-varying system parameters. Different from the previous work on sign-error algorithms, the parameters are time-varying and their dynamics are modeled by a discrete-time Markov chain. A distinctive feature of the algorithms is the multi-time-scale framework for characterizing parameter varia- tions and algorithm updating speeds. This is realized by considering the stepsize of the estimation algorithms and a scaling parameter that defines the transition rates of the Markov jump process. Depending on the relative time scales of these two pro- cesses, suitably scaled sequences of the estimates are shown to converge to either an ordinary differential equation, or a set of ordinary differential equations modulated by random switching, or a stochastic differential equation, or stochastic differential equa- tions with random switching. Using weak convergence methods, convergence and rates of convergence of the algorithms are obtained for all these cases.