• We study the problem of variable selection for linear models under the high-dimensional asymptotic setting, where the number of observations $n$ grows at the same rate as the number of predictors $p$. We consider two-stage variable selection techniques (TVS) in which the first stage uses bridge estimators to obtain an estimate of the regression coefficients, and the second stage simply thresholds this estimate to select the "important" predictors. The asymptotic false discovery proportion (AFDP) and true positive proportion (ATPP) of these TVS are evaluated. We prove that for a fixed ATPP, in order to obtain a smaller AFDP, one should pick a bridge estimator with smaller asymptotic mean square error in the first stage of TVS. Based on such principled discovery, we present a sharp comparison of different TVS, via an in-depth investigation of the estimation properties of bridge estimators. Rather than "order-wise" error bounds with loose constants, our analysis focuses on precise error characterization. Various interesting signal-to-noise ratio and sparsity settings are studied. Our results offer new and thorough insights into high-dimensional variable selection. For instance, we prove that a TVS with Ridge in its first stage outperforms TVS with other bridge estimators in large noise settings; two-stage LASSO becomes inferior when the signal is rare and weak. As a by-product, we show that two-stage methods outperform some standard variable selection techniques, such as LASSO and Sure Independence Screening, under certain conditions.
  • We consider an $\ell_2$-regularized non-convex optimization problem for recovering signals from their noisy phaseless observations. We design and study the performance of a message passing algorithm that aims to solve this optimization problem. We consider the asymptotic setting $m,n \rightarrow \infty$, $m/n \rightarrow \delta$ and obtain sharp performance bounds, where $m$ is the number of measurements and $n$ is the signal dimension. We show that for complex signals the algorithm can perform accurate recovery with only $m= \left(\frac{64}{\pi^2}-4\right)n \approx 2.5n$ measurements. Also, we provide sharp analysis on the sensitivity of the algorithm to noise. We highlight the following facts about our message passing algorithm: (i) Adding $\ell_2$ regularization to the non-convex loss function can be beneficial. (ii) Spectral initialization has marginal impact on the performance of the algorithm. The sharp analyses in this paper, not only enable us to compare the performance of our method with other phase recovery schemes, but also shed light on designing better iterative algorithms for other non-convex optimization problems.
  • The class of Lq-regularized least squares (LQLS) are considered for estimating a p-dimensional vector \b{eta} from its n noisy linear observations y = X\b{eta}+w. The performance of these schemes are studied under the high-dimensional asymptotic setting in which p grows linearly with n. In this asymptotic setting, phase transition diagrams (PT) are often used for comparing the performance of different estimators. Although phase transition analysis is shown to provide useful information for compressed sensing, the fact that it ignores the measurement noise not only limits its applicability in many application areas, but also may lead to misunderstandings. For instance, consider a linear regression problem in which n > p and the signal is not exactly sparse. If the measurement noise is ignored in such systems, regularization techniques, such as LQLS, seem to be irrelevant since even the ordinary least squares (OLS) returns the exact solution. However, it is well-known that if n is not much larger than p then the regularization techniques improve the performance of OLS. In response to this limitation of PT analysis, we consider the low-noise sensitivity analysis. We show that this analysis framework (i) reveals the advantage of LQLS over OLS, (ii) captures the difference between different LQLS estimators even when n > p, and (iii) provides a fair comparison among different estimators in high signal-to-noise ratios. As an application of this framework, we will show that under mild conditions LASSO outperforms other LQLS even when the signal is dense. Finally, by a simple transformation we connect our low-noise sensitivity framework to the classical asymptotic regime in which n/p goes to infinity and characterize how and when regularization techniques offer improvements over ordinary least squares, and which regularizer gives the most improvement when the sample size is large.
  • We propose a scalable closed-form formula ($\text{ALO}_{\lambda}$) to estimate the extra-sample prediction error of regularized estimators. Our approach employs existing heuristic arguments to approximate the leave-one-out perturbations. We theoretically prove the accuracy of $\text{ALO}_{\lambda}$ in the high-dimensional setting where the number of predictors is proportional to the number of observations. We show how this approach can be applied to popular non-differentiable regularizers, such as LASSO, and compare its results with other popular risk estimation techniques, such as Stein's unbiased risk estimate (SURE). Our theoretical findings are illustrated using simulations and real recordings from spatially sensitive neurons (grid cells) in the medial entorhinal cortex of a rat.
  • We study the problem of estimating $\beta \in \mathbb{R}^p$ from its noisy linear observations $y= X\beta+ w$, where $w \sim N(0, \sigma_w^2 I_{n\times n})$, under the following high-dimensional asymptotic regime: given a fixed number $\delta$, $p \rightarrow \infty$, while $n/p \rightarrow \delta$. We consider the popular class of $\ell_q$-regularized least squares (LQLS) estimators, a.k.a. bridge, given by the optimization problem: \begin{equation*} \hat{\beta} (\lambda, q ) \in \arg\min_\beta \frac{1}{2} \|y-X\beta\|_2^2+ \lambda \|\beta\|_q^q, \end{equation*} and characterize the almost sure limit of $\frac{1}{p} \|\hat{\beta} (\lambda, q )- \beta\|_2^2$. The expression we derive for this limit does not have explicit forms and hence are not useful in comparing different algorithms, or providing information in evaluating the effect of $\delta$ or sparsity level of $\beta$. To simplify the expressions, researchers have considered the ideal "no-noise" regime and have characterized the values of $\delta$ for which the almost sure limit is zero. This is known as the phase transition analysis. In this paper, we first perform the phase transition analysis of LQLS. Our results reveal some of the limitations and misleading features of the phase transition analysis. To overcome these limitations, we propose the study of these algorithms under the low noise regime. Our new analysis framework not only sheds light on the results of the phase transition analysis, but also makes an accurate comparison of different regularizers possible.
  • This paper deals with linear equalization in massive multi-user multiple-input multiple-output (MU-MIMO) wireless systems. We first provide simple conditions on the antenna configuration for which the well-known linear minimum mean-square error (L-MMSE) equalizer provides near-optimal spectral efficiency, and we analyze its performance in the presence of parameter mismatches in the signal and/or noise powers. We then propose a novel, optimally-tuned NOnParametric Equalizer (NOPE) for massive MU-MIMO systems, which avoids knowledge of the transmit signal and noise powers altogether. We show that NOPE achieves the same performance as that of the L-MMSE equalizer in the large-antenna limit, and we demonstrate its efficacy in realistic, finite-dimensional systems. From a practical perspective, NOPE is computationally efficient and avoids dedicated training that is typically required for parameter estimation
  • Modern image and video compression codes employ elaborate structures existing in such signals to encode them into few number of bits. Compressed sensing recovery algorithms on the other hand use such signals' structures to recover them from few linear observations. Despite the steady progress in the field of compressed sensing, structures that are often used for signal recovery are still much simpler than those employed by state-of-the-art compression codes. The main goal of this paper is to bridge this gap through answering the following question: Can one employ a given compression code to build an efficient (polynomial time) compressed sensing recovery algorithm? In response to this question, the compression-based gradient descent (C-GD) algorithm is proposed. C-GD, which is a low-complexity iterative algorithm, is able to employ a generic compression code for compressed sensing and therefore elevates the scope of structures used in compressed sensing to those used by compression codes. The convergence performance of C-GD and its required number of measurements in terms of the rate-distortion performance of the compression code are theoretically analyzed. It is also shown that C-GD is robust to additive white Gaussian noise. Finally, the presented simulation results show that combining C-GD with commercial image compression codes such as JPEG2000 yields state-of-the-art performance in imaging applications.
  • Consider the problem of estimating parameters $X^n \in \mathbb{R}^n $, generated by a stationary process, from $m$ response variables $Y^m = AX^n+Z^m$, under the assumption that the distribution of $X^n$ is known. This is the most general version of the Bayesian linear regression problem. The lack of computationally feasible algorithms that can employ generic prior distributions and provide a good estimate of $X^n$ has limited the set of distributions researchers use to model the data. In this paper, a new scheme called Q-MAP is proposed. The new method has the following properties: (i) It has similarities to the popular MAP estimation under the noiseless setting. (ii) In the noiseless setting, it achieves the "asymptotically optimal performance" when $X^n$ has independent and identically distributed components. (iii) It scales favorably with the dimensions of the problem and therefore is applicable to high-dimensional setups. (iv) The solution of the Q-MAP optimization can be found via a proposed iterative algorithm which is provably robust to the error (noise) in the response variables.
  • Let $ K(X_1, \ldots, X_n)$ and $H(X_n | X_{n-1}, \ldots, X_1)$ denote the Kolmogorov complexity and Shannon's entropy rate of a stationary and ergodic process $\{X_i\}_{i=-\infty}^\infty$. It has been proved that \[ \frac{K(X_1, \ldots, X_n)}{n} - H(X_n | X_{n-1}, \ldots, X_1) \rightarrow 0, \] almost surely. This paper studies the convergence rate of this asymptotic result. In particular, we show that if the process satisfies certain mixing conditions, then there exists $\sigma<\infty$ such that $$\sqrt{n}\left(\frac{K(X_{1:n})}{n}- H(X_0|X_1,\dots,X_{-\infty})\right) \rightarrow_d N(0,\sigma^2).$$ Furthermore, we show that under slightly stronger mixing conditions one may obtain non-asymptotic concentration bounds for the Kolmogorov complexity.
  • Expectation Maximization (EM) is among the most popular algorithms for estimating parameters of statistical models. However, EM, which is an iterative algorithm based on the maximum likelihood principle, is generally only guaranteed to find stationary points of the likelihood objective, and these points may be far from any maximizer. This article addresses this disconnect between the statistical principles behind EM and its algorithmic properties. Specifically, it provides a global analysis of EM for specific models in which the observations comprise an i.i.d. sample from a mixture of two Gaussians. This is achieved by (i) studying the sequence of parameters from idealized execution of EM in the infinite sample limit, and fully characterizing the limit points of the sequence in terms of the initial parameters; and then (ii) based on this convergence analysis, establishing statistical consistency (or lack thereof) for the actual sequence of parameters produced by EM.
  • We investigate the performance of mismatched data detection in large multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems, where the prior distribution of the transmit signal used in the data detector differs from the true prior. To minimize the performance loss caused by this prior mismatch, we include a tuning stage into our recently-proposed large MIMO approximate message passing (LAMA) algorithm, which allows us to develop mismatched LAMA algorithms with optimal as well as sub-optimal tuning. We show that carefully-selected priors often enable simpler and computationally more efficient algorithms compared to LAMA with the true prior while achieving near-optimal performance. A performance analysis of our algorithms for a Gaussian prior and a uniform prior within a hypercube covering the QAM constellation recovers classical and recent results on linear and non-linear MIMO data detection, respectively.
  • In many application areas we are faced with the following question: Can we recover a sparse vector $x_o \in \mathbb{R}^N$ from its undersampled set of noisy observations $y \in \mathbb{R}^n$, $y=A x_o+w$. The last decade has witnessed a surge of algorithms and theoretical results addressing this question. One of the most popular algorithms is the $\ell_p$-regularized least squares (LPLS) given by the following formulation: \[ \hat{x}(\gamma,p )\in \arg\min_x \frac{1}{2}\|y - Ax\|_2^2+\gamma\|x\|_p^p, \] where $p \in [0,1]$. Despite the non-convexity of these problems for $p<1$, they are still appealing because of the following folklores in compressed sensing: (i) $\hat{x}(\gamma,p )$ is closer to $x_o$ than $\hat{x}(\gamma,1)$. (ii) If we employ iterative methods that aim to converge to a local minima of LPLS, then under good initialization these algorithms converge to a solution that is closer to $x_o$ than $\hat{x}(\gamma,1)$. In spite of the existence of plenty of empirical results that support these folklore theorems, the theoretical progress to establish them has been very limited. This paper aims to study the above folklore theorems and establish their scope of validity. Starting with approximate message passing algorithm as a heuristic method for solving LPLS, we study the impact of initialization on the performance of AMP. Then, we employ the replica analysis to show the connection between the solution of AMP and $\hat{x}(\gamma, p)$ in the asymptotic settings. This enables us to compare the accuracy of $\hat{x}(\gamma,p)$ for $p \in [0,1]$. In particular, we will characterize the phase transition and noise sensitivity of LPLS for every $0\leq p\leq 1$ accurately. Our results in the noiseless setting confirm that LPLS exhibits the same phase transition for every $0\leq p <1$ and this phase transition is much higher than that of LASSO.
  • A denoising algorithm seeks to remove noise, errors, or perturbations from a signal. Extensive research has been devoted to this arena over the last several decades, and as a result, today's denoisers can effectively remove large amounts of additive white Gaussian noise. A compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction algorithm seeks to recover a structured signal acquired using a small number of randomized measurements. Typical CS reconstruction algorithms can be cast as iteratively estimating a signal from a perturbed observation. This paper answers a natural question: How can one effectively employ a generic denoiser in a CS reconstruction algorithm? In response, we develop an extension of the approximate message passing (AMP) framework, called Denoising-based AMP (D-AMP), that can integrate a wide class of denoisers within its iterations. We demonstrate that, when used with a high performance denoiser for natural images, D-AMP offers state-of-the-art CS recovery performance while operating tens of times faster than competing methods. We explain the exceptional performance of D-AMP by analyzing some of its theoretical features. A key element in D-AMP is the use of an appropriate Onsager correction term in its iterations, which coerces the signal perturbation at each iteration to be very close to the white Gaussian noise that denoisers are typically designed to remove.
  • We consider the problem of recovering a vector $\beta_o \in \mathbb{R}^p$ from $n$ random and noisy linear observations $y= X\beta_o + w$, where $X$ is the measurement matrix and $w$ is noise. The LASSO estimate is given by the solution to the optimization problem $\hat{\beta}_{\lambda} = \arg \min_{\beta} \frac{1}{2} \|y-X\beta\|_2^2 + \lambda \| \beta \|_1$. Among the iterative algorithms that have been proposed for solving this optimization problem, approximate message passing (AMP) has attracted attention for its fast convergence. Despite significant progress in the theoretical analysis of the estimates of LASSO and AMP, little is known about their behavior as a function of the regularization parameter $\lambda$, or the thereshold parameters $\tau^t$. For instance the following basic questions have not yet been studied in the literature: (i) How does the size of the active set $\|\hat{\beta}^\lambda\|_0/p$ behave as a function of $\lambda$? (ii) How does the mean square error $\|\hat{\beta}_{\lambda} - \beta_o\|_2^2/p$ behave as a function of $\lambda$? (iii) How does $\|\beta^t - \beta_o \|_2^2/p$ behave as a function of $\tau^1, \ldots, \tau^{t-1}$? Answering these questions will help in addressing practical challenges regarding the optimal tuning of $\lambda$ or $\tau^1, \tau^2, \ldots$. This paper answers these questions in the asymptotic setting and shows how these results can be employed in deriving simple and theoretically optimal approaches for tuning the parameters $\tau^1, \ldots, \tau^t$ for AMP or $\lambda$ for LASSO. It also explores the connection between the optimal tuning of the parameters of AMP and the optimal tuning of LASSO.
  • Optimal data detection in multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) communication systems with a large number of antennas at both ends of the wireless link entails prohibitive computational complexity. In order to reduce the computational complexity, a variety of sub-optimal detection algorithms have been proposed in the literature. In this paper, we analyze the optimality of a novel data-detection method for large MIMO systems that relies on approximate message passing (AMP). We show that our algorithm, referred to as individually-optimal (IO) large-MIMO AMP (short IO-LAMA), is able to perform IO data detection given certain conditions on the MIMO system and the constellation set (e.g., QAM or PSK) are met.
  • Real-world transceiver designs for multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) wireless communication systems are affected by a number of hardware impairments that already appear at the transmit side, such as amplifier non-linearities, quantization artifacts, and phase noise. While such transmit-side impairments are routinely ignored in the data-detection literature, they often limit reliable communication in practical systems. In this paper, we present a novel data-detection algorithm, referred to as large-MIMO approximate message passing with transmit impairments (short LAMA-I), which takes into account a broad range of transmit-side impairments in wireless systems with a large number of transmit and receive antennas. We provide conditions in the large-system limit for which LAMA-I achieves the error-rate performance of the individually-optimal (IO) data detector. We furthermore demonstrate that LAMA-I achieves near-IO performance at low computational complexity in realistic, finite dimensional large-MIMO systems.
  • Iterative thresholding algorithms are well-suited for high-dimensional problems in sparse recovery and compressive sensing. The performance of this class of algorithms depends heavily on the tuning of certain threshold parameters. In particular, both the final reconstruction error and the convergence rate of the algorithm crucially rely on how the threshold parameter is set at each step of the algorithm. In this paper, we propose a parameter-free approximate message passing (AMP) algorithm that sets the threshold parameter at each iteration in a fully automatic way without either having an information about the signal to be reconstructed or needing any tuning from the user. We show that the proposed method attains both the minimum reconstruction error and the highest convergence rate. Our method is based on applying the Stein unbiased risk estimate (SURE) along with a modified gradient descent to find the optimal threshold in each iteration. Motivated by the connections between AMP and LASSO, it could be employed to find the solution of the LASSO for the optimal regularization parameter. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work concerning parameter tuning that obtains the fastest convergence rate with theoretical guarantees.
  • This paper concerns the performance of the LASSO (also knows as basis pursuit denoising) for recovering sparse signals from undersampled, randomized, noisy measurements. We consider the recovery of the signal $x_o \in \mathbb{R}^N$ from $n$ random and noisy linear observations $y= Ax_o + w$, where $A$ is the measurement matrix and $w$ is the noise. The LASSO estimate is given by the solution to the optimization problem $x_o$ with $\hat{x}_{\lambda} = \arg \min_x \frac{1}{2} \|y-Ax\|_2^2 + \lambda \|x\|_1$. Despite major progress in the theoretical analysis of the LASSO solution, little is known about its behavior as a function of the regularization parameter $\lambda$. In this paper we study two questions in the asymptotic setting (i.e., where $N \rightarrow \infty$, $n \rightarrow \infty$ while the ratio $n/N$ converges to a fixed number in $(0,1)$): (i) How does the size of the active set $\|\hat{x}_\lambda\|_0/N$ behave as a function of $\lambda$, and (ii) How does the mean square error $\|\hat{x}_{\lambda} - x_o\|_2^2/N$ behave as a function of $\lambda$? We then employ these results in a new, reliable algorithm for solving LASSO based on approximate message passing (AMP).
  • Can compression algorithms be employed for recovering signals from their underdetermined set of linear measurements? Addressing this question is the first step towards applying compression algorithms for compressed sensing (CS). In this paper, we consider a family of compression algorithms $\mathcal{C}_r$, parametrized by rate $r$, for a compact class of signals $\mathcal{Q} \subset \mathds{R}^n$. The set of natural images and JPEG at different rates are examples of $\mathcal{Q}$ and $\mathcal{C}_r$, respectively. We establish a connection between the rate-distortion performance of $\mathcal{C}_r$, and the number of linear measurements required for successful recovery in CS. We then propose compressible signal pursuit (CSP) algorithm and prove that, with high probability, it accurately and robustly recovers signals from an underdetermined set of linear measurements. We also explore the performance of CSP in the recovery of infinite dimensional signals.
  • The nascent field of compressed sensing is founded on the fact that high-dimensional signals with "simple structure" can be recovered accurately from just a small number of randomized samples. Several specific kinds of structures have been explored in the literature, from sparsity and group sparsity to low-rankness. However, two fundamental questions have been left unanswered, namely: What are the general abstract meanings of "structure" and "simplicity"? And do there exist universal algorithms for recovering such simple structured objects from fewer samples than their ambient dimension? In this paper, we address these two questions. Using algorithmic information theory tools such as the Kolmogorov complexity, we provide a unified definition of structure and simplicity. Leveraging this new definition, we develop and analyze an abstract algorithm for signal recovery motivated by Occam's Razor.Minimum complexity pursuit (MCP) requires just O(3\kappa) randomized samples to recover a signal of complexity \kappa and ambient dimension n. We also discuss the performance of MCP in the presence of measurement noise and with approximately simple signals.
  • We consider the problem of recovering a block (or group) sparse signal from an underdetermined set of random linear measurements, which appear in compressed sensing applications such as radar and imaging. Recent results of Donoho, Johnstone, and Montanari have shown that approximate message passing (AMP) in combination with Stein's shrinkage outperforms group LASSO for large block sizes. In this paper, we prove that, for a fixed block size and in the strong undersampling regime (i.e., having very few measurements compared to the ambient dimension), AMP cannot improve upon group LASSO, thereby complementing the results of Donoho et al.
  • Recovering a sparse signal from an undersampled set of random linear measurements is the main problem of interest in compressed sensing. In this paper, we consider the case where both the signal and the measurements are complex. We study the popular reconstruction method of $\ell_1$-regularized least squares or LASSO. While several studies have shown that the LASSO algorithm offers desirable solutions under certain conditions, the precise asymptotic performance of this algorithm in the complex setting is not yet known. In this paper, we extend the approximate message passing (AMP) algorithm to the complex signals and measurements and obtain the complex approximate message passing algorithm (CAMP). We then generalize the state evolution framework recently introduced for the analysis of AMP, to the complex setting. Using the state evolution, we derive accurate formulas for the phase transition and noise sensitivity of both LASSO and CAMP.
  • It has recently been proved that the popular nonlocal means (NLM) denoising algorithm does not optimally denoise images with sharp edges. Its weakness lies in the isotropic nature of the neighborhoods it uses to set its smoothing weights. In response, in this paper we introduce several theoretical and practical anisotropic nonlocal means (ANLM) algorithms and prove that they are near minimax optimal for edge-dominated images from the Horizon class. On real-world test images, an ANLM algorithm that adapts to the underlying image gradients outperforms NLM by a significant margin.
  • The L1-regularized maximum likelihood estimation problem has recently become a topic of great interest within the machine learning, statistics, and optimization communities as a method for producing sparse inverse covariance estimators. In this paper, a proximal gradient method (G-ISTA) for performing L1-regularized covariance matrix estimation is presented. Although numerous algorithms have been proposed for solving this problem, this simple proximal gradient method is found to have attractive theoretical and numerical properties. G-ISTA has a linear rate of convergence, resulting in an O(log e) iteration complexity to reach a tolerance of e. This paper gives eigenvalue bounds for the G-ISTA iterates, providing a closed-form linear convergence rate. The rate is shown to be closely related to the condition number of the optimal point. Numerical convergence results and timing comparisons for the proposed method are presented. G-ISTA is shown to perform very well, especially when the optimal point is well-conditioned.
  • A host of problems involve the recovery of structured signals from a dimensionality reduced representation such as a random projection; examples include sparse signals (compressive sensing) and low-rank matrices (matrix completion). Given the wide range of different recovery algorithms developed to date, it is natural to ask whether there exist "universal" algorithms for recovering "structured" signals from their linear projections. We recently answered this question in the affirmative in the noise-free setting. In this paper, we extend our results to the case of noisy measurements.