• Constraints on models of the late time acceleration of the universe assume the cosmological principle of homogeneity and isotropy on large scales. However, small scale inhomogeneities can alter observational and dynamical relations, affecting the inferred cosmological parameters. For precision constraints on the properties of dark energy, it is important to assess the potential systematic effects arising from these inhomogeneities. In this study, we use the Type Ia supernova magnitude-redshift relation to constrain the inhomogeneities as described by the Dyer-Roeder distance relation and the effect they have on the dark energy equation of state ($w$), together with priors derived from the most recent results of the measurements of the power spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background and Baryon Acoustic Oscillations. We find that the parameter describing the inhomogeneities ($\eta$) is correlated with $w$. The best fit values $w = -0.933 \pm 0.065$ and $\eta = 0.61 \pm 0.37$ are consistent with homogeneity at $< 2 \sigma$ level. Assuming homogeneity ($\eta =1$), we find $w = -0.961 \pm 0.055$, indicating only a small change in $w$. For a time-dependent dark energy equation of state, $w_0 = -0.951 \pm 0.112$ and $w_a = 0.059 \pm 0.418$, to be compared with $w_0 = -0.983 \pm 0.127$ and $w_a = 0.07 \pm 0.432$ in the homogeneous case, which is also a very small change. Current data are not sufficient to constrain the fraction of dark matter (DM) in compact objects, $f_p$ at the 95$\%$ C.L., however at 68$\%$ C.L. $f_p < 0.73$. Future supernova surveys will improve the constraints on $\eta$, and $f_p$, by a factor of $\sim$ 10.
  • We present the discovery and measurements of a gravitationally lensed supernova (SN) behind the galaxy cluster MOO J1014+0038. Based on multi-band Hubble Space Telescope and Very Large Telescope (VLT) photometry of the supernova, and VLT spectroscopy of the host galaxy, we find a 97.5% probability that this SN is a SN Ia, and a 2.5% chance of a CC SN. Our typing algorithm combines the shape and color of the light curve with the expected rates of each SN type in the host galaxy. With a redshift of 2.2216, this is the highest redshift SN Ia discovered with a spectroscopic host-galaxy redshift. A further distinguishing feature is that the lensing cluster, at redshift 1.23, is the most distant to date to have an amplified SN. The SN lies in the middle of the color and light-curve shape distributions found at lower redshift, disfavoring strong evolution to z = 2.22. We estimate an amplification due to gravitational lensing of 2.8+0.6-0.5 (1.10 +- 0.23 mag)---compatible with the value estimated from the weak-lensing-derived mass and the mass-concentration relation from LambdaCDM simulations---making it the most amplified SN Ia discovered behind a galaxy cluster.
  • Observations of high-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe~Ia) are used to study the cosmic transparency at optical wavelengths. Assuming a flat $\Lambda$CDM cosmological model based on BAO and CMB results, redshift dependent deviations of SN~Ia distances are used to constrain mechanisms that would dim light. The analysis is based on the most recent Pantheon SN compilation, for which there is a $0.03\pm0.01 {\textrm \,(\rm stat)}$ mag discrepancy in the distant supernova distance moduli relative to the $\Lambda$CDM model anchored by supernovae at $z<0.05$. While there are known systematic uncertainties that combined could explain the observed offset, here we entertain the possibility that the discrepancy may instead be explained by scattering of supernova light in the intergalactic medium (IGM). We focus on two effects: Compton scattering by free electrons and extinction by dust in the IGM. We find that if the discrepancy is due entirely to dimming by dust, the measurements can be modeled with a cosmic dust density $\Omega_{\rm IGM}^{\rm dust} = 8 \cdot 10^{-5} (1+z)^{-1}$, corresponding to an average attenuation of $2\cdot 10^{-5}$ mag Mpc$^{-1}$ in V-band. Forthcoming SN~Ia studies may provide a definitive measurement of the IGM dust properties, while still providing an unbiased estimate of cosmological parameters by introducing additional parameters in the global fits to the observations.
  • We explore cosmological constraints on the sum of the three active neutrino masses $M_{\nu}$ in the context of dynamical dark energy (DDE) models with equation of state (EoS) parametrized as a function of redshift $z$ by $w(z)=w_0+w_a\,z/(1+z)$, and satisfying $w(z)\geq-1$ for all $z$. We perform a Bayesian analysis and show that, within these models, the bounds on $M_{\nu}$ \textit{do not degrade} with respect to those obtained in the $\Lambda$CDM case; in fact the bounds are slightly tighter, despite the enlarged parameter space. We explain our results based on the observation that, for fixed choices of $w_0\,,w_a$ such that $w(z)\geq-1$ (but not $w=-1$ for all $z$), the upper limit on $M_{\nu}$ is tighter than the $\Lambda$CDM limit because of the well-known degeneracy between $w$ and $M_{\nu}$. The Bayesian analysis we have carried out then integrates over the possible values of $w_0$-$w_a$ such that $w(z)\geq-1$, all of which correspond to tighter limits on $M_{\nu}$ than the $\Lambda$CDM limit. We find a 95\% confidence level (C.L.) upper bound of $M_{\nu}<0.13\,\mathrm{eV}$. This bound can be compared with $M_{\nu}<0.16\,\mathrm{eV}$ at 95\%~C.L., obtained within the $\Lambda$CDM model, and $M_{\nu}<0.41\,\mathrm{eV}$ at 95\%~C.L., obtained in a DDE model with arbitrary EoS (which allows values of $w < -1$). Contrary to the results derived for DDE models with arbitrary EoS, we find that a dark energy component with $w(z)\geq-1$ is unable to alleviate the tension between high-redshift observables and direct measurements of the Hubble constant $H_0$. Finally, in light of the results of this analysis, we also discuss the implications for DDE models of a possible determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy by laboratory searches. (abstract abridged)
  • Nearby type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), such as SN 2017cbv, are useful events to address the question of what the elusive progenitor systems of the explosions are. Hosseinzadeh et al. (2017) suggested that the early blue excess of the lightcurve of SN 2017cbv could be due to the supernova ejecta interacting with a non-degenerate companion star. Some SN Ia progenitor models suggest the existence of circumstellar (CS) environments in which strong outflows create low density cavities of different radii. Matter deposited at the edges of the cavities, should be at distances at which photoionisation due to early ultraviolet (UV) radiation of SNe Ia causes detectable changes to the observable Na I D and Ca II H&K absorption lines. To study possible narrow absorption lines from such material, we obtained a time-series of high-resolution spectra of SN 2017cbv at phases between $-14.8$ and $+83$ days with respect to $B$-band maximum, covering the time at which photoionisation is predicted to occur. Both narrow Na I D and Ca II H&K are detected in all spectra, with no measurable changes between the epochs. We use photoionisation models to rule out the presence of Na I and Ca II gas clouds along the line-of-sight of SN 2017cbv between $\sim8\times10^{16}$--$2\times10^{19}$~cm and $\sim10^{15}$--$10^{17}$~cm, respectively. Assuming typical abundances, the mass of a homogenous spherical CS gas shell with radius $R$ must be limited to $M^{\rm CSM}_{\rm HI}<3\times10^{-4}\times(R/10^{17}[{\rm cm}])^2$ M$_{\odot}$. The bounds point to progenitor models that deposit little gas in their CS environment.
  • The Theia Collaboration: Celine Boehm, Alberto Krone-Martins, Antonio Amorim, Guillem Anglada-Escude, Alexis Brandeker, Frederic Courbin, Torsten Ensslin, Antonio Falcao, Katherine Freese, Berry Holl, Lucas Labadie, Alain Leger, Fabien Malbet, Gary Mamon, Barbara McArthur, Alcione Mora, Michael Shao, Alessandro Sozzetti, Douglas Spolyar, Eva Villaver, Conrado Albertus, Stefano Bertone, Herve Bouy, Michael Boylan-Kolchin, Anthony Brown, Warren Brown, Vitor Cardoso, Laurent Chemin, Riccardo Claudi, Alexandre C. M. Correia, Mariateresa Crosta, Antoine Crouzier, Francis-Yan Cyr-Racine, Mario Damasso, Antonio da Silva, Melvyn Davies, Payel Das, Pratika Dayal, Miguel de Val-Borro, Antonaldo Diaferio, Adrienne Erickcek, Malcolm Fairbairn, Morgane Fortin, Malcolm Fridlund, Paulo Garcia, Oleg Gnedin, Ariel Goobar, Paulo Gordo, Renaud Goullioud, Nigel Hambly, Nathan Hara, David Hobbs, Erik Hog, Andrew Holland, Rodrigo Ibata, Carme Jordi, Sergei Klioner, Sergei Kopeikin, Thomas Lacroix, Jacques Laskar, Christophe Le Poncin-Lafitte, Xavier Luri, Subhabrata Majumdar, Valeri Makarov, Richard Massey, Bertrand Mennesson, Daniel Michalik, Andre Moitinho de Almeida, Ana Mourao, Leonidas Moustakas, Neil Murray, Matthew Muterspaugh, Micaela Oertel, Luisa Ostorero, Angeles Perez-Garcia, Imants Platais, Jordi Portell i de Mora, Andreas Quirrenbach, Lisa Randall, Justin Read, Eniko Regos, Barnes Rory, Krzysztof Rybicki, Pat Scott, Jean Schneider, Jakub Scholtz, Arnaud Siebert, Ismael Tereno, John Tomsick, Wesley Traub, Monica Valluri, Matt Walker, Nicholas Walton, Laura Watkins, Glenn White, Dafydd Wyn Evans, Lukasz Wyrzykowski, Rosemary Wyse
    July 2, 2017 astro-ph.IM
    In the context of the ESA M5 (medium mission) call we proposed a new satellite mission, Theia, based on relative astrometry and extreme precision to study the motion of very faint objects in the Universe. Theia is primarily designed to study the local dark matter properties, the existence of Earth-like exoplanets in our nearest star systems and the physics of compact objects. Furthermore, about 15 $\%$ of the mission time was dedicated to an open observatory for the wider community to propose complementary science cases. With its unique metrology system and "point and stare" strategy, Theia's precision would have reached the sub micro-arcsecond level. This is about 1000 times better than ESA/Gaia's accuracy for the brightest objects and represents a factor 10-30 improvement for the faintest stars (depending on the exact observational program). In the version submitted to ESA, we proposed an optical (350-1000nm) on-axis TMA telescope. Due to ESA Technology readiness level, the camera's focal plane would have been made of CCD detectors but we anticipated an upgrade with CMOS detectors. Photometric measurements would have been performed during slew time and stabilisation phases needed for reaching the required astrometric precision.
  • Recent re-calibration of the Type Ia supernova (SNe~Ia) magnitude-redshift relation combined with cosmic microwave background (CMB) and baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) data have provided excellent constraints on the standard cosmological model. Here, we examine particular classes of alternative cosmologies, motivated by various physical mechanisms, e.g. scalar fields, modified gravity and phase transitions to test their consistency with observations of SNe~Ia and the ratio of the angular diameter distances from the CMB and BAO. Using a model selection criterion for a relative comparison of the models (the Bayes Factor), we find moderate to strong evidence that the data prefer flat $\Lambda$ CDM over models invoking a thawing behaviour of the quintessence scalar field. However, some exotic models like the growing neutrino mass cosmology and vacuum metamorphosis still present acceptable evidence values. The bimetric gravity model with only the linear interaction term can be ruled out by the combination of SNe~Ia and CMB/BAO datasets whereas the model with linear and quadratic interaction terms has a comparable evidence value to standard $\Lambda$ CDM. Thawing models are found to have significantly poorer evidence compared to flat $\Lambda$ CDM cosmology under the assumption that the CMB compressed likelihood provides an adequate description for these non-standard cosmologies. We also present estimates for constraints from future data and find that geometric probes from oncoming surveys can put severe limits on non-standard cosmological models.
  • We present a ground-based near-infrared search for lensed supernovae behind the massive cluster Abell 1689 at z=0.18, one of the most powerful gravitational telescopes that nature provides. Our survey was based on multi-epoch $J$-band observations with the HAWK-I instrument on VLT, with supporting optical data from the Nordic Optical Telescope. Our search resulted in the discovery of five high-redshift, $0.671<z<1.703$, photometrically classified core-collapse supernovae with magnifications in the range $\Delta m$ = $-0.31$ to $-1.58$ mag, as calculated from lensing models in the literature. Thanks to the power of the lensing cluster, the survey had the sensitivity to detect supernovae up to very high-redshifts, $z$$\sim$$3$, albeit for a limited region of space. We present a study of the core-collapse supernova rates for $0.4\leq z< 2.9$, and find good agreement with both previous estimates, and the predictions from the star formation history. During our survey, we also discovered 2 type Ia supernovae in A1689 cluster members, which allowed us to determine the cluster Ia rate to be $0.14^{+0.19}_{-0.09}\pm0.01$ $\rm{SNuB}$$\,h^2$ (SNuB$\equiv 10^{-12} \,\rm{SNe} \, L^{-1}_{\odot,B} yr^{-1}$). The cluster rate normalized by the stellar mass is $0.10^{+0.13}_{-0.06}\pm0.02$ in $\rm SNuM$$\,h^2$ (SNuM$\equiv 10^{-12} \,\rm{SNe} \, M^{-1}_{\odot} yr^{-1}$). Furthermore, we explore the optimal future survey for improving the core-collapse supernova rate measurements at $z\gtrsim2$ using gravitational telescopes, as well as for the detections with multiply lensed images, and find that the planned WFIRST space mission has excellent prospects. Massive clusters can be used as gravitational telescopes to significantly expand the survey range of supernova searches, with important implications for the study of the high-$z$ transient universe.
  • We present results of an optical search for Cepheid variable stars using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in 19 hosts of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and the maser-host galaxy NGC 4258, conducted as part of the SH0ES project (Supernovae and H0 for the Equation of State of dark energy). The targets include 9 newly imaged SN Ia hosts using a novel strategy based on a long-pass filter that minimizes the number of HST orbits required to detect and accurately determine Cepheid properties. We carried out a homogeneous reduction and analysis of all observations, including new universal variability searches in all SN Ia hosts, that yielded a total of 2200 variables with well-defined selection criteria -- the largest such sample identified outside the Local Group. These objects are used in a companion paper to determine the local value of H0 with a total uncertainty of 2.4%.
  • (abridged) Observations of Faraday rotation for extragalactic sources probe magnetic fields both inside and outside the Milky Way. Building on our earlier estimate of the Galactic contribution, we set out to estimate the extragalactic contributions. We discuss the problems involved; in particular, we point out that taking the difference between the observed values and the Galactic foreground reconstruction is not a good estimate for the extragalactic contributions. We point out a degeneracy between the contributions to the observed values due to extragalactic magnetic fields and observational noise and comment on the dangers of over-interpreting an estimate without taking into account its uncertainty information. To overcome these difficulties, we develop an extended reconstruction algorithm based on the assumption that the observational uncertainties are accurately described for a subset of the data, which can overcome the degeneracy with the extragalactic contributions. We present a probabilistic derivation of the algorithm and demonstrate its performance using a simulation, yielding a high quality reconstruction of the Galactic Faraday rotation foreground, a precise estimate of the typical extragalactic contribution, and a well-defined probabilistic description of the extragalactic contribution for each data point. We then apply this reconstruction technique to a catalog of Faraday rotation observations. We vary our assumptions about the data, showing that the dispersion of extragalactic contributions to observed Faraday depths is most likely lower than 7 rad/m^2, in agreement with earlier results, and that the extragalactic contribution to an individual data point is poorly constrained by the data in most cases.
  • Since the discovery of the unusual prototype SN 2002cx, the eponymous class of low-velocity, hydrogen-poor supernovae has grown to include at most another two dozen members identified from several heterogeneous surveys, in some cases ambiguously. Here we present the results of a systematic study of 1077 hydrogen-poor supernovae discovered by the Palomar Transient Factory, leading to nine new members of this peculiar class. Moreover we find there are two distinct subclasses based on their spectroscopic, photometric, and host galaxy properties: The "SN 2002cx-like" supernovae tend to be in later-type or more irregular hosts, have more varied and generally dimmer luminosities, have longer rise times, and lack a Ti II trough when compared to the "SN 2002es-like" supernovae. None of our objects show helium, and we counter a previous claim of two such events. We also find that these transients comprise 5.6+17-3.7% (90% confidence) of all SNe Ia, lower compared to earlier estimates. Combining our objects with the literature sample, we propose that these subclasses have two distinct physical origins.
  • In this paper we use near-infrared (NIR) spectral observations of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) to study the uncertainties inherent to NIR K corrections. To do so, 75 previously published NIR spectra of 33 SNe Ia are employed to determine K-correction uncertainties in the YJHK_s passbands as a function of temporal phase and redshift. The resultant K corrections are then fed into an interpolation algorithm that provides mean K corrections as a function of temporal phase and robust estimates of the associated errors. These uncertainties are both statistical and intrinsic --- i.e., due to the diversity of spectral features from object to object --- and must be included in the overall error budget of cosmological parameters constrained through the use of NIR observations of SNe Ia. Intrinsic variations are likely the dominant source of error for all four passbands at maximum light. Given the present data, the total Y-band K-correction uncertainties at maximum are smallest, amounting to +/- 0.04 mag at a redshift of z = 0.08. The J-band K-term errors are also reasonably small (+/- 0.06 mag), but intrinsic variations of spectral features and noise introduced by telluric corrections in the H band currently limit the total K-correction errors at maximum to +/- 0.10 mag at z = 0.08. Finally, uncertainties in the K_s-band K terms at maximum amount to +/- 0.07 mag at this same redshift. These results are largely constrained by the small number of published NIR spectra of SNe Ia, which do not yet allow spectral templates to be constructed as a function of the light curve decline rate.
  • This paper describes the data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey conducted between 2005 and 2007. Light curves, spectra, classifications, and ancillary data are presented for 10,258 variable and transient sources discovered through repeat ugriz imaging of SDSS Stripe 82, a 300 deg2 area along the celestial equator. This data release is comprised of all transient sources brighter than r~22.5 mag with no history of variability prior to 2004. Dedicated spectroscopic observations were performed on a subset of 889 transients, as well as spectra for thousands of transient host galaxies using the SDSS-III BOSS spectrographs. Photometric classifications are provided for the candidates with good multi-color light curves that were not observed spectroscopically. From these observations, 4607 transients are either spectroscopically confirmed, or likely to be, supernovae, making this the largest sample of supernova candidates ever compiled. We present a new method for SN host-galaxy identification and derive host-galaxy properties including stellar masses, star-formation rates, and the average stellar population ages from our SDSS multi-band photometry. We derive SALT2 distance moduli for a total of 1443 SN Ia with spectroscopic redshifts as well as photometric redshifts for a further 677 purely-photometric SN Ia candidates. Using the spectroscopically confirmed subset of the three-year SDSS-II SN Ia sample and assuming a flat Lambda-CDM cosmology, we determine Omega_M = 0.315 +/- 0.093 (statistical error only) and detect a non-zero cosmological constant at 5.7 sigmas.
  • The Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) SN 2000cx was one of the most peculiar transients ever discovered, with a rise to maximum brightness typical of a SN Ia, but a slower decline and a higher photospheric temperature. Thirteen years later SN 2013bh (aka iPTF13abc), a near identical twin, was discovered and we obtained optical and near-IR photometry and low-resolution optical spectroscopy from discovery until about 1 month past r-band maximum brightness. The spectra of both objects show iron-group elements (Co II, Ni II, Fe II, Fe III, and high-velocity features [HVFs] of Ti II), intermediate-mass elements (Si II, Si III, and S II), and separate normal velocity features (~12000 km/s) and HVFs (~24000 km/s) of Ca II. Persistent absorption from Fe III and Si III, along with the colour evolution, imply high blackbody temperatures for SNe 2013bh and 2000cx (~12000 K). Both objects lack narrow Na I D absorption and exploded in the outskirts of their hosts, indicating that the SN environments were relatively free of interstellar or circumstellar material and may imply that the progenitors came from a relatively old and low-metallicity stellar population. Models of SN 2000cx, seemingly applicable to SN 2013bh, imply the production of up to ~1 M_Sun of Ni-56 and (4.3-5.5)e-3 M_Sun of fast-moving Ca ejecta.
  • We report upper limits on dust emission at far-infrared (IR) wavelengths from three nearby Type Ia supernovae: SNe 2011by, 2011fe and 2012cg. Observations were carried out at 70 um and 160 um with the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) on board the Herschel Space Observatory. None of the supernovae were detected in the far-IR, allowing us to place upper limits on the amount of pre-existing dust in the circumstellar environment. Due to its proximity, SN 2011fe provides the tightest constraints, M_dust < 7 * 10^-3 M_sun at a 3 sigma-level for dust temperatures T_dust ~500 K assuming silicate or graphite dust grains of size a = 0.1 um. For SNe 2011by and 2012cg the corresponding upper limits are less stringent, with M_dust < 0.1 M_sun for the same assumptions.
  • Massive galaxy clusters at intermediate redshifts act as gravitational lenses that can magnify supernovae (SNe) occurring in background galaxies. We assess the possibility to use lensed SNe to put constraints on the mass models of galaxy clusters and the Hubble parameter at high redshift. Due to the standard candle nature of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), observational information on the lensing magnification from an intervening galaxy cluster can be used to constrain the model for the cluster mass distribution. A statistical analysis using parametric cluster models was performed to investigate the possible improvements from lensed SNe Ia for the accurately modeled galaxy cluster A1689 and the less well constrained cluster A2204. Time delay measurements obtained from SNe lensed by accurately modeled galaxy clusters can be used to measure the Hubble parameter. For a survey of A1689 we estimate the expected rate of detectable SNe Ia and of multiply imaged SNe. The velocity dispersion and core radius of the main cluster potential show strong correlations with the predicted magnifications and can therefore be constrained by observations of SNe Ia in background galaxies. This technique proves especially powerful for galaxy clusters with only few known multiple image systems. The main uncertainty for measurements of the Hubble parameter from the time delay of strongly lensed SNe is due to cluster model uncertainties. For the extremely well modeled cluster A1689, a single time delay measurement could be used to determine the Hubble parameter with a precision of ~ 10%. We conclude that observations of SNe Ia behind galaxy clusters can be used to improve the mass modeling of the large scale component of galaxy clusters and thus the distribution of dark matter. Time delays from SNe strongly lensed by accurately modeled galaxy clusters can be used to measure the Hubble constant at high redshifts.
  • It has been suggested that multiple scattering on circumstellar dust could explain the non-standard reddening observed in the line-of-sight to Type Ia supernovae. In this work we use Monte Carlo simulations to examine how the scattered light would affect the shape of optical lightcurves and spectral features. We find that the effects on the lightcurve widths, apparent time evolution of color excess and blending of spectral features originating at different photospheric velocities should allow for tests of the circumstellar dust hypothesis on a case by case basis. Our simulations also show that for circumstellar shells with radii r=1e16-1e19 cm, the lightcurve modifications are well described by the empirical Dm_15 parameter and intrinsic color variations of order sigma_{BV}=0.05-0.1 arise naturally. For large shell radii an excess lightcurve tail is expected in B-band, as observed in e.g. SN2006X.
  • We present the temporal evolution of line profiles ranging from near ultraviolet to optical wavelengths by analyzing 59 Subaru telescope spectra of normal Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) in the intermediate redshift range (0.05 < z < 0.4) discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. We derive line velocities, peak wavelengths and pseudo-equivalent widths (pEWs) of these lines. Additionally, we compare the line profiles around the date of maximum brightness with those from their nearby counterparts. We find that line profiles represented by their velocities and pEWs for intermediate redshift SNe Ia are consistent with their nearby counterparts within 2 $\sigma$. These findings support the picture that SNe Ia are a "standard" candle for the intermediate redshift range as has been shown between SNe Ia at nearby and high redshifts. There is a hint that the "MgII \lambda 4300" pEW distribution for intermediate redshift SNe Ia is larger than for the nearby sample, which could be interpreted as a difference in the progenitor abundance.
  • The discovery of dark energy by the first generation of high-redshift supernova surveys has generated enormous interest beyond cosmology and has dramatic implications for fundamental physics. Distance measurements using supernova explosions are the most direct probes of the expansion history of the Universe, making them extremely useful tools to study the cosmic fabric and the properties of gravity at the largest scales. The past decade has seen the confirmation of the original results. Type Ia supernovae are among the leading techniques to obtain high-precision measurements of the dark energy equation of state parameter, and in the near future, its time dependence. The success of these efforts depends on our ability to understand a large number of effects, mostly of astrophysical nature, influencing the observed flux at Earth. The frontier now lies in understanding if the observed phenomenon is due to vacuum energy, albeit its unnatural density, or some exotic new physics. Future surveys will address the systematic effects with improved calibration procedures and provide thousands of supernovae for detailed studies.
  • We present an analysis of the host galaxy dependencies of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) from the full three year sample of the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. We rediscover, to high significance, the strong correlation between host galaxy typeand the width of the observed SN light curve, i.e., fainter, quickly declining SNe Ia favor passive host galaxies, while brighter, slowly declining Ia's favor star-forming galaxies. We also find evidence (at between 2 to 3 sigma) that SNe Ia are ~0.1 magnitudes brighter in passive host galaxies, than in star-forming hosts, after the SN Ia light curves have been standardized using the light curve shape and color variations: This difference in brightness is present in both the SALT2 and MCLS2k2 light curve fitting methodologies. We see evidence for differences in the SN Ia color relationship between passive and star-forming host galaxies, e.g., for the MLCS2k2 technique, we see that SNe Ia in passive hosts favor a dust law of R_V ~1, while SNe Ia in star-forming hosts require R_V ~2. The significance of these trends depends on the range of SN colors considered. We demonstrate that these effects can be parameterized using the stellar mass of the host galaxy (with a confidence of >4 sigma) and including this extra parameter provides a better statistical fit to our data. Our results suggest that future cosmological analyses of SN Ia samples should include host galaxy information.
  • We present multi-band photometry and multi-epoch spectroscopy of the peculiar Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2007qd, discovered by the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. It possesses physical properties intermediate to those of the peculiar SN 2002cx and the extremely low-luminosity SN 2008ha. Optical photometry indicates that it had an extraordinarily fast rise time of <= 10 days and a peak absolute B magnitude of -15.4 +/- 0.2 at most, making it one of the most subluminous SN Ia ever observed. Follow-up spectroscopy of SN 2007qd near maximum brightness unambiguously shows the presence of intermediate-mass elements which are likely caused by carbon/oxygen nuclear burning. Near maximum brightness, SN 2007qd had a photospheric velocity of only 2800 km/s, similar to that of SN 2008ha but about 4000 and 7000 km/s less than that of SN 2002cx and normal SN Ia, respectively. We show that the peak luminosities of SN 2002cx-like objects are highly correlated with both their light-curve stretch and photospheric velocities. Its strong apparent connection to other SN 2002cx-like events suggests that SN 2007qd is also a pure deflagration of a white dwarf, although other mechanisms cannot be ruled out. It may be a critical link between SN 2008ha and the other members of the SN 2002cx-like class of objects.
  • Large planned photometric surveys will discover hundreds of thousands of supernovae (SNe), outstripping the resources available for spectroscopic follow-up and necessitating the development of purely photometric methods to exploit these events for cosmological study. We present a light-curve fitting technique for SN Ia photometric redshift (photo-z) estimation in which the redshift is determined simultaneously with the other fit parameters. We implement this "LCFIT+Z" technique within the frameworks of the MLCS2k2 and SALT-II light-curve fit methods and determine the precision on the redshift and distance modulus. This method is applied to a spectroscopically confirmed sample of 296 SNe Ia from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey and 37 publicly available SNe Ia from the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). We have also applied the method to a large suite of realistic simulated light curves for existing and planned surveys, including SDSS, SNLS, and LSST. When intrinsic SN color fluctuations are included, the photo-z precision for the simulation is consistent with that in the data. Finally, we compare the LCFIT+Z photo-z precision with previous results using color-based SN photo-z estimates.
  • We present a measurement of the volumetric Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The adopted sample of supernovae (SNe) includes 516 SNe Ia at redshift z \lesssim 0.3, of which 270 (52%) are spectroscopically identified as SNe Ia. The remaining 246 SNe Ia were identified through their light curves; 113 of these objects have spectroscopic redshifts from spectra of their host galaxy, and 133 have photometric redshifts estimated from the SN light curves. Based on consideration of 87 spectroscopically confirmed non-Ia SNe discovered by the SDSS-II SN Survey, we estimate that 2.04+1.61-0.95 % of the photometric SNe Ia may be misidentified. The sample of SNe Ia used in this measurement represents an order of magnitude increase in the statistics for SN Ia rate measurements in the redshift range covered by the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. If we assume a SN Ia rate that is constant at low redshift (z < 0.15), then the SN observations can be used to infer a value of the SN rate of rV = (2.69+0.34+0.21-0.30-0.01) x10^{-5} SNe yr^{-1} Mpc-3 (H0 /(70 km s^{-1} Mpc^{-1}))^{3} at a mean redshift of ~ 0.12, based on 79 SNe Ia of which 72 are spectroscopically confirmed. However, the large sample of SNe Ia included in this study allows us to place constraints on the redshift dependence of the SN Ia rate based on the SDSS-II Supernova Survey data alone. Fitting a power-law model of the SN rate evolution, r_V(z) = A_p x ((1 + z)/(1 + z0))^{\nu}, over the redshift range 0.0 < z < 0.3 with z0 = 0.21, results in A_p = (3.43+0.15-0.15) x 10^{-5} SNe yr^{-1} Mpc-3 (H0 /(70 km s^{-1} Mpc^{-1}))^{3} and \nu = 2.04+0.90-0.89.
  • ABRIDGED We present measurements of the Type Ia supernova (SN) rate in galaxy clusters based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The cluster SN Ia rate is determined from 9 SN events in a set of 71 C4 clusters at z <0.17 and 27 SN events in 492 maxBCG clusters at 0.1 < z < 0.3$. We find values for the cluster SN Ia rate of $({0.37}^{+0.17+0.01}_{-0.12-0.01}) \mathrm{SNu}r h^{2}$ and $({0.55}^{+0.13+0.02}_{-0.11-0.01}) \mathrm{SNu}r h^{2}$ ($\mathrm{SNu}x = 10^{-12} L_{x\sun}^{-1} \mathrm{yr}^{-1}$) in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively, where the quoted errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. The SN rate for early-type galaxies is found to be $({0.31}^{+0.18+0.01}_{-0.12-0.01}) \mathrm{SNu}r h^{2}$ and $({0.49}^{+0.15+0.02}_{-0.11-0.01})$ $\mathrm{SNu}r h^{2}$ in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate for the brightest cluster galaxies (BCG) is found to be $({2.04}^{+1.99+0.07}_{-1.11-0.04}) \mathrm{SNu}r h^{2}$ and $({0.36}^{+0.84+0.01}_{-0.30-0.01}) \mathrm{SNu}r h^{2}$ in C4 and maxBCG clusters. The ratio of the SN Ia rate in cluster early-type galaxies to that of the SN Ia rate in field early-type galaxies is ${1.94}^{+1.31+0.043}_{-0.91-0.015}$ and ${3.02}^{+1.31+0.062}_{-1.03-0.048}$, for C4 and maxBCG clusters. The SN rate in galaxy clusters as a function of redshift...shows only weak dependence on redshift. Combining our current measurements with previous measurements, we fit the cluster SN Ia rate data to a linear function of redshift, and find $r_{L} = $ $[(0.49^{+0.15}_{-0.14}) +$ $(0.91^{+0.85}_{-0.81}) \times z]$ $\mathrm{SNu}B$ $h^{2}$. A comparison of the radial distribution of SNe in cluster to field early-type galaxies shows possible evidence for an enhancement of the SN rate in the cores of cluster early-type galaxies... we estimate the fraction of cluster SNe that are hostless to be $(9.4^+8._3-5.1)%$.
  • We apply the Standardized Candle Method (SCM) for Type II Plateau supernovae (SNe II-P), which relates the velocity of the ejecta of a SN to its luminosity during the plateau, to 15 SNe II-P discovered over the three season run of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey - II Supernova Survey. The redshifts of these SNe - 0.027 < z < 0.144 - cover a range hitherto sparsely sampled in the literature; in particular, our SNe II-P sample contains nearly as many SNe in the Hubble flow (z > 0.01) as all of the current literature on the SCM combined. We find that the SDSS SNe have a very small intrinsic I-band dispersion (0.22 mag), which can be attributed to selection effects. When the SCM is applied to the combined SDSS-plus-literature set of SNe II-P, the dispersion increases to 0.29 mag, larger than the scatter for either set of SNe separately. We show that the standardization cannot be further improved by eliminating SNe with positive plateau decline rates, as proposed in Poznanski et al. (2009). We thoroughly examine all potential systematic effects and conclude that for the SCM to be useful for cosmology, the methods currently used to determine the Fe II velocity at day 50 must be improved, and spectral templates able to encompass the intrinsic variations of Type II-P SNe will be needed.