• Due to the scarcity of quantitative details about biological phenomena, quantitative modeling in systems biology can be compromised, especially at the subcellular scale. One way to get around this is qualitative modeling because it requires few to no quantitative information. One of the most popular qualitative modeling approaches is the Boolean network formalism. However, Boolean models allow variables to take only two values, which can be too simplistic in some cases. The present work proposes a modeling approach derived from Boolean networks where continuous logical operators are used and where edges can be tuned. Using continuous logical operators allows variables to be more finely valued while remaining qualitative. To consider that some biological interactions can be slower or weaker than other ones, edge states are also computed in order to modulate in speed and strength the signal they convey. The proposed formalism is illustrated on a toy network coming from the epidermal growth factor receptor signaling pathway. The obtained simulations show that continuous results are produced, thus allowing finer analysis. The simulations also show that modulating the signal conveyed by the edges allows to incorporate knowledge about the interactions they model. The goal is to provide enhancements in the ability of qualitative models to simulate the dynamics of biological networks while limiting the need of quantitative information.
  • In a previous article, an algorithm for identifying therapeutic targets in Boolean networks modeling pathological mechanisms was introduced. In the present article, the improvements made on this algorithm, named kali, are described. These improvements are i) the possibility to work on asynchronous Boolean networks, ii) a finer assessment of therapeutic targets and iii) the possibility to use multivalued logic. kali assumes that the attractors of a dynamical system, such as a Boolean network, are associated with the phenotypes of the modeled biological system. Given a logic-based model of pathological mechanisms, kali searches for therapeutic targets able to reduce the reachability of the attractors associated with pathological phenotypes, thus reducing their likeliness. kali is illustrated on an example network and used on a biological case study. The case study is a published logic-based model of bladder tumorigenesis from which kali returns consistent results. However, like any computational tool, kali can predict but can not replace human expertise: it is a supporting tool for coping with the complexity of biological systems in the field of drug discovery.
  • Target identification, one of the steps of drug discovery, aims at identifying biomolecules whose function should be therapeutically altered in order to cure the considered pathology. This work proposes an algorithm for in silico target identification using Boolean network attractors. It assumes that attractors of dynamical systems, such as Boolean networks, correspond to phenotypes produced by the modeled biological system. Under this assumption, and given a Boolean network modeling a pathophysiology, the algorithm identifies target combinations able to remove attractors associated with pathological phenotypes. It is tested on a Boolean model of the mammalian cell cycle bearing a constitutive inactivation of the retinoblastoma protein, as seen in cancers, and its applications are illustrated on a Boolean model of Fanconi anemia. The results show that the algorithm returns target combinations able to remove attractors associated with pathological phenotypes and then succeeds in performing the proposed in silico target identification. However, as with any in silico evidence, there is a bridge to cross between theory and practice, thus requiring it to be used in combination with wet lab experiments. Nevertheless, it is expected that the algorithm is of interest for target identification, notably by exploiting the inexpensiveness and predictive power of computational approaches to optimize the efficiency of costly wet lab experiments.