• In this paper we improve the deterministic complexity of two fundamental communication primitives in the classical model of ad-hoc radio networks with unknown topology: broadcasting and wake-up. We consider an unknown radio network, in which all nodes have no prior knowledge about network topology, and know only the size of the network $n$, the maximum in-degree of any node $\Delta$, and the eccentricity of the network $D$. For such networks, we first give an algorithm for wake-up, based on the existence of small universal synchronizers. This algorithm runs in $O(\frac{\min\{n, D \Delta\} \log n \log \Delta}{\log\log \Delta})$ time, the fastest known in both directed and undirected networks, improving over the previous best $O(n \log^2n)$-time result across all ranges of parameters, but particularly when maximum in-degree is small. Next, we introduce a new combinatorial framework of block synchronizers and prove the existence of such objects of low size. Using this framework, we design a new deterministic algorithm for the fundamental problem of broadcasting, running in $O(n \log D \log\log\frac{D \Delta}{n})$ time. This is the fastest known algorithm for the problem in directed networks, improving upon the $O(n \log n \log \log n)$-time algorithm of De Marco (2010) and the $O(n \log^2 D)$-time algorithm due to Czumaj and Rytter (2003). It is also the first to come within a log-logarithmic factor of the $\Omega(n \log D)$ lower bound due to Clementi et al.\ (2003). Our results also have direct implications on the fastest \emph{deterministic leader election} and \emph{clock synchronization} algorithms in both directed and undirected radio networks, tasks which are commonly used as building blocks for more complex procedures.
  • The \emph{beep model} is a very weak communications model in which devices in a network can communicate only via beeps and silence. As a result of its weak assumptions, it has broad applicability to many different implementations of communications networks. This comes at the cost of a restrictive environment for algorithm design. Despite being only recently introduced, the beep model has received considerable attention, in part due to its relationship with other communication models such as that of ad-hoc radio networks. However, there has been no definitive published result for several fundamental tasks in the model. We aim to rectify this with our paper. We present algorithms and lower bounds for a variety of fundamental global communications tasks in the model.
  • In this paper we present a framework for leader election in multi-hop radio networks which yield randomized leader election algorithms taking $O(\text{broadcasting time})$ in expectation, and another which yields algorithms taking fixed $O(\sqrt{\log n})$-times broadcasting time. Both succeed with high probability. We show how to implement these frameworks in radio networks without collision detection, and in networks with collision detection (in fact in the strictly weaker beep model). In doing so, we obtain the first optimal expected-time leader election algorithms in both settings, and also improve the worst-case running time in directed networks without collision detection by an $O(\sqrt {\log n})$ factor.
  • We initiate the study of property testing in arbitrary planar graphs. We prove that bipartiteness can be tested in constant time, improving on the previous bound of $\tilde{O}(\sqrt{n})$ for graphs on $n$ vertices. The constant-time testability was only known for planar graphs with bounded degree. Our algorithm is based on random walks. Since planar graphs have good separators, i.e., bad expansion, our analysis diverges from standard techniques that involve the fast convergence of random walks on expanders. We reduce the problem to the task of detecting an odd-parity cycle in a multigraph induced by constant-length cycles. We iteratively reduce the length of cycles while preserving the detection probability, until the multigraph collapses to a collection of easily discoverable self-loops. Our approach extends to arbitrary minor-free graphs. We also believe that our techniques will find applications to testing other properties in arbitrary minor-free graphs.
  • For over a decade now we have been witnessing the success of {\em massive parallel computation} (MPC) frameworks, such as MapReduce, Hadoop, Dryad, or Spark. One of the reasons for their success is the fact that these frameworks are able to accurately capture the nature of large-scale computation. In particular, compared to the classic distributed algorithms or PRAM models, these frameworks allow for much more local computation. The fundamental question that arises in this context is though: can we leverage this additional power to obtain even faster parallel algorithms? A prominent example here is the {\em maximum matching} problem---one of the most classic graph problems. It is well known that in the PRAM model one can compute a 2-approximate maximum matching in $O(\log{n})$ rounds. However, the exact complexity of this problem in the MPC framework is still far from understood. Lattanzi et al. showed that if each machine has $n^{1+\Omega(1)}$ memory, this problem can also be solved $2$-approximately in a constant number of rounds. These techniques, as well as the approaches developed in the follow up work, seem though to get stuck in a fundamental way at roughly $O(\log{n})$ rounds once we enter the near-linear memory regime. It is thus entirely possible that in this regime, which captures in particular the case of sparse graph computations, the best MPC round complexity matches what one can already get in the PRAM model, without the need to take advantage of the extra local computation power. In this paper, we finally refute that perplexing possibility. That is, we break the above $O(\log n)$ round complexity bound even in the case of {\em slightly sublinear} memory per machine. In fact, our improvement here is {\em almost exponential}: we are able to deliver a $(2+\epsilon)$-approximation to maximum matching, for any fixed constant $\epsilon>0$, in $O((\log \log n)^2)$ rounds.
  • We study two fundamental communication primitives: broadcasting and leader election in the classical model of multi-hop radio networks with unknown topology and without collision detection mechanisms. It has been known for almost 20 years that in undirected networks with n nodes and diameter D, randomized broadcasting requires Omega(D log n/D + log^2 n) rounds in expectation, assuming that uninformed nodes are not allowed to communicate (until they are informed). Only very recently, Haeupler and Wajc (PODC'2016) showed that this bound can be slightly improved for the model with spontaneous transmissions, providing an O(D log n loglog n / log D + log^O(1) n)-time broadcasting algorithm. In this paper, we give a new and faster algorithm that completes broadcasting in O(D log n/log D + log^O(1) n) time, with high probability. This yields the first optimal O(D)-time broadcasting algorithm whenever D is polynomial in n. Furthermore, our approach can be applied to design a new leader election algorithm that matches the performance of our broadcasting algorithm. Previously, all fast randomized leader election algorithms have been using broadcasting as their subroutine and their complexity have been asymptotically strictly bigger than the complexity of broadcasting. In particular, the fastest previously known randomized leader election algorithm of Ghaffari and Haeupler (SODA'2013) requires O(D log n/D min{loglog n, log n/D} + log^O(1) n)-time with high probability. Our new algorithm requires O(D log n / log D + log^O(1) n) time with high probability, and it achieves the optimal O(D) time whenever D is polynomial in n.
  • We present a new, distributed method to compute approximate Nash equilibria in bimatrix games. In contrast to previous approaches that analyze the two payoff matrices at the same time (for example, by solving a single LP that combines the two players payoffs), our algorithm first solves two independent LPs, each of which is derived from one of the two payoff matrices, and then compute approximate Nash equilibria using only limited communication between the players. Our method has several applications for improved bounds for efficient computations of approximate Nash equilibria in bimatrix games. First, it yields a best polynomial-time algorithm for computing \emph{approximate well-supported Nash equilibria (WSNE)}, which guarantees to find a 0.6528-WSNE in polynomial time. Furthermore, since our algorithm solves the two LPs separately, it can be used to improve upon the best known algorithms in the limited communication setting: the algorithm can be implemented to obtain a randomized expected-polynomial-time algorithm that uses poly-logarithmic communication and finds a 0.6528-WSNE. The algorithm can also be carried out to beat the best known bound in the query complexity setting, requiring $O(n \log n)$ payoff queries to compute a 0.6528-WSNE. Finally, our approach can also be adapted to provide the best known communication efficient algorithm for computing \emph{approximate Nash equilibria}: it uses poly-logarithmic communication to find a 0.382-approximate Nash equilibrium.
  • We study the problem of recognizing the cluster structure of a graph in the framework of property testing in the bounded degree model. Given a parameter $\varepsilon$, a $d$-bounded degree graph is defined to be $(k, \phi)$-clusterable, if it can be partitioned into no more than $k$ parts, such that the (inner) conductance of the induced subgraph on each part is at least $\phi$ and the (outer) conductance of each part is at most $c_{d,k}\varepsilon^4\phi^2$, where $c_{d,k}$ depends only on $d,k$. Our main result is a sublinear algorithm with the running time $\widetilde{O}(\sqrt{n}\cdot\mathrm{poly}(\phi,k,1/\varepsilon))$ that takes as input a graph with maximum degree bounded by $d$, parameters $k$, $\phi$, $\varepsilon$, and with probability at least $\frac23$, accepts the graph if it is $(k,\phi)$-clusterable and rejects the graph if it is $\varepsilon$-far from $(k, \phi^*)$-clusterable for $\phi^* = c'_{d,k}\frac{\phi^2 \varepsilon^4}{\log n}$, where $c'_{d,k}$ depends only on $d,k$. By the lower bound of $\Omega(\sqrt{n})$ on the number of queries needed for testing graph expansion, which corresponds to $k=1$ in our problem, our algorithm is asymptotically optimal up to polylogarithmic factors.
  • The $\varepsilon$-well-supported Nash equilibrium is a strong notion of approximation of a Nash equilibrium, where no player has an incentive greater than $\varepsilon$ to deviate from any of the pure strategies that she uses in her mixed strategy. The smallest constant $\varepsilon$ currently known for which there is a polynomial-time algorithm that computes an $\varepsilon$-well-supported Nash equilibrium in bimatrix games is slightly below $2/3$. In this paper we study this problem for symmetric bimatrix games and we provide a polynomial-time algorithm that gives a $(1/2+\delta)$-well-supported Nash equilibrium, for an arbitrarily small positive constant $\delta$.
  • We present sublinear-time (randomized) algorithms for finding simple cycles of length at least $k\geq 3$ and tree-minors in bounded-degree graphs. The complexity of these algorithms is related to the distance of the graph from being $C_k$-minor-free (resp., free from having the corresponding tree-minor). In particular, if the graph is far (i.e., $\Omega(1)$-far) {from} being cycle-free, i.e. if one has to delete a constant fraction of edges to make it cycle-free, then the algorithm finds a cycle of polylogarithmic length in time $\tildeO(\sqrt{N})$, where $N$ denotes the number of vertices. This time complexity is optimal up to polylogarithmic factors. The foregoing results are the outcome of our study of the complexity of {\em one-sided error} property testing algorithms in the bounded-degree graphs model. For example, we show that cycle-freeness of $N$-vertex graphs can be tested with one-sided error within time complexity $\tildeO(\poly(1/\e)\cdot\sqrt{N})$. This matches the known $\Omega(\sqrt{N})$ query lower bound, and contrasts with the fact that any minor-free property admits a {\em two-sided error} tester of query complexity that only depends on the proximity parameter $\e$. For any constant $k\geq3$, we extend this result to testing whether the input graph has a simple cycle of length at least $k$. On the other hand, for any fixed tree $T$, we show that $T$-minor-freeness has a one-sided error tester of query complexity that only depends on the proximity parameter $\e$. Our algorithm for finding cycles in bounded-degree graphs extends to general graphs, where distances are measured with respect to the actual number of edges. Such an extension is not possible with respect to finding tree-minors in $o(\sqrt{N})$ complexity.
  • Let P be a set of n points in the Euclidean plane and let O be the origin point in the plane. In the k-tour cover problem (called frequently the capacitated vehicle routing problem), the goal is to minimize the total length of tours that cover all points in P, such that each tour starts and ends in O and covers at most k points from P. The k-tour cover problem is known to be NP-hard. It is also known to admit constant factor approximation algorithms for all values of k and even a polynomial-time approximation scheme (PTAS) for small values of k, i.e., k=O(log n / log log n). We significantly enlarge the set of values of k for which a PTAS is provable. We present a new PTAS for all values of k <= 2^{log^{\delta}n}, where \delta = \delta(\epsilon). The main technical result proved in the paper is a novel reduction of the k-tour cover problem with a set of n points to a small set of instances of the problem, each with O((k/\epsilon)^O(1)) points.