• Crystalline symmetries can generate exotic band-crossing features, which can lead to unconventional fermionic excitations with interesting physical properties. We show how a cubic Dirac point---a four-fold-degenerate band-crossing point with cubic dispersion in a plane and a linear dispersion in the third direction---can be stabilized through the presence of a nonsymmorphic glide mirror symmetry in the space group of the crystal. Notably, the cubic Dirac point in our case appears on a threefold axis, even though it has been believed previously that such a point can only appear on a sixfold axis. We show that a cubic Dirac point involving a threefold axis can be realized close to the Fermi level in the non-ferroelectric phase of LiOsO$_3$. Upon lowering temperature, LiOsO$_3$ has been shown experimentally to undergo a structural phase transition from the non-ferroelectric phase to the ferroelectric phase with spontaneously broken inversion symmetry. Remarkably, we find that the broken symmetry transforms the cubic Dirac point into three mutually-crossed nodal rings. There also exist several linear Dirac points in the low-energy band structure of LiOsO$_3$, each of which is transformed into a single nodal ring across the phase transition.
  • Weyl semimetals are novel topological conductors that host Weyl fermions as emergent quasiparticles. While the Weyl fermions in high-energy physics are strictly defined as the massless solution of the Dirac equation and uniquely fixed by Lorentz symmetry, there is no such constraint for a topological metal in general. Specifically, the Weyl quasiparticles can arise by breaking either the space-inversion ($\mathcal{I}$) or time-reversal ($\mathcal{T}$) symmetry. They can either respect Lorentz symmetry (type-I) or strongly violate it (type-II). To date, different types of Weyl fermions have been predicted to occur only in different classes of materials. In this paper, we present a significant materials breakthrough by identifying a large class of Weyl materials in the RAlX (R=Rare earth, Al, X=Ge, Si) family that can realize all different types of emergent Weyl fermions ($\mathcal{I}$-breaking, $\mathcal{T}$-breaking, type-I or type-II), depending on a suitable choice of the rare earth elements. Specifically, RAlX can be ferromagnetic, nonmagnetic or antiferromagnetic and the electronic band topology and topological nature of the Weyl fermions can be tuned. The unparalleled tunability and the large number of compounds make the RAlX family of compounds a unique Weyl semimetal class for exploring the wide-ranging topological phenomena associated with different types of emergent Weyl fermions in transport, spectroscopic and device-based experiments.
  • We use photoemission spectroscopy to discover the first topological magnet in three dimensions, the material Co$_2$MnGa.
  • We propose that the quasi-one-dimensional molybdenum selenide compound Tl2-xMo6Se6 is a time-reversal-invariant topological superconductor induced by inter-sublattice pairing, even in the absence of spin-orbit coupling (SOC). No noticeable change in superconductivity is observed in Tl-deficient (0<=x<=0.1) compounds. At weak SOC, the superconductor prefers the triplet d vector lying perpendicular to the chain direction and two-dimensional E2u symmetry, which is driven to a nematic order by spontaneous rotation symmetry breaking. The locking energy of the d vector is estimated to be weak and hence the proof of its direction would rely on tunnelling or phase-sensitive measurements.
  • Chiral fermions in three-dimensional condensed matter systems display dramatic examples of a topological bulk-boundary correspondence: the surface projections of the bulk chiral nodes, typically conventional $C=\pm 1$ Weyl fermions, appear connected by Fermi arcs. However, Weyl fermions have thus far only been experimentally realized in narrowly separated pairs, for which the Fermi arcs effects are weak. Recent works have introduced unconventional chiral Fermions, including single threefold-degenerate and double sixfold-degenerate spin-1 Weyl nodes. We report that in space group (SG) 198 $P2_{1}3$, the absence of rotoinversions permits at Brillouin zone corner $R$ a sixfold-degenerate double spin-1 Weyl point with nonzero Chern number. Furthermore, using a simple tight-binding model, we demonstrate that the minimal band connectivity of SG 198 displays this unconventional fermion, as well as a previously uncharacterized fourfold-degenerate chiral fermion at $\Gamma$. We perform first-principles electronic structure calculations demonstrating RhSi as representative of this physics. We find that in RhSi crystals, these two chiral fermions lie close to the Fermi energy and are connected by an otherwise large bulk gap. Each unconventional fermion displays Chern number $\pm4$ and their projections are connected by large surface Fermi arcs. We conclude with an analysis of the modified bulk photogalvanic effect in these unconventional Weyl semimetals.
  • Motivated by the recent experiments indicating superconductivity in metal-decorated graphene sheets, we investigate their quasi-particle structure within the framework of an effective tight-binding Hamiltonian augmented by appropriate BCS-like pairing terms for p-type order parameter. The normal state band structure of graphene is modified not only through interaction with adsorbed metal atoms, but also due to the folding of bands at Brillouin zone boundaries resulting from a $\sqrt{3}\times\sqrt{3}R30^{\circ}$ reconstruction. Several different types of pairing symmetries are analyzed utilizing Nambu-Gorkov Green's function techniques to show that $p+ip$-symmetric nearest-neighbor pairing yields the most enhanced superconducting gap. The character of the order parameter depends on the nature of the atomic orbitals involved in the pairing process and exhibits interesting angular and radial asymmetries. Finally, we suggest a method to distinguish between singlet and triplet type superconductivity in the presence of magnetic substitutional impurities using scanning tunneling spectroscopy.
  • Topological nodal-line semimetals are exotic conductors that host symmetry-protected conducting nodal-lines in their bulk electronic spectrum and nontrivial drumhead states on the surface. Based on first-principles calculations and an effective model analysis, we identify the presence of topological nodal-line semimetal states in the TT'X family of compounds (T, T' = transition metal, X= Si, or Ge) in the absence of spin-orbit coupling (SOC). Taking ZrPtGe as an exemplar system, we show that this material harbors a single nodal line on the $k_y=0$ plane, which is protected by the $M_y$ mirror plane symmetry. Surface electronic structure calculations further reveal the existence of a drumhead surface state nested inside the nodal line projection on the (010) surface with a saddle-like energy dispersion. When the SOC is included, the nodal line gaps out and the system transitions to a strong topological insulator state with $Z_2=(1;000)$. The topological surface state evolves from the drumhead surface state via the sharing of its saddle-like energy dispersion within the bulk energy gap. These features differ remarkably from those of the currently known topological surface states in topological insulators such as Bi$_2$Se$_3$ with Dirac-cone-like energy dispersions.
  • Weyl semimetals are extremely interesting. Although the first Weyl semimetal was recently discovered in TaAs, research progress is still significantly hindered due to the lack of robust and ideal materials candidates. In order to observe the many predicted exotic phenomena that arise from Weyl fermions, it is of critical importance to find robust and ideal Weyl semimetals, which have fewer Weyl nodes and more importantly whose Weyl nodes are well separated in momentum space and are located close to the chemical potential in energy. In this paper, we propose by far the most robust and ideal Weyl semimetal candidate in the inversion breaking, single crystalline compound tantalum sulfide Ta$_3$S$_2$ with new and novel properties beyond TaAs. We find that Ta$_3$S$_2$ has only 8 Weyl nodes, all of which have the same energy that is merely 10 meV below the chemical potential. Crucially, our results show that Ta$_3$S$_2$ has the largest $k$-space separation between Weyl nodes among known Weyl semimetal candidates, which is about twice larger than TaAs and twenty times larger than the predicted value in WTe$_2$. Moreover, we predict that increasing the lattice by $<4\%$ can annihilate all Weyl nodes, driving a novel topological metal-to-insulator transition from a Weyl semimetal state to a topological insulator state. We further discover that changing the lattice constant can move the Weyl nodes and the van Hove singularities with enhanced density of states to the chemical potential. Our prediction provides a critically needed robust candidate for this rapidly developing field. The well separated Weyl nodes, the topological metal-to-insulator transition and the remarkable tunabilities suggest Ta$_3$S$_2$'s potential as the ideal platform in future device-applications based on Weyl semimetals.
  • We combine quasiparticle interference simulation (theory) and atomic resolution scanning tunneling spectro-microscopy (experiment) to visualize the interference patterns on a type-II Weyl semimetal Mo$_{x}$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ for the first time. Our simulation based on first-principles band topology theoretically reveals the surface electron scattering behavior. We identify the topological Fermi arc states and reveal the scattering properties of the surface states in Mo$_{0.66}$W$_{0.34}$Te$_2$. In addition, our result reveals an experimental signature of the topology via the interconnectivity of bulk and surface states, which is essential for understanding the unusual nature of this material.
  • We report the first observation of coherent surface states on cubic perovskite oxide SrVO3(001) thin films through spectroscopic imaging scanning tunneling microscopy. A direct link between the observed atomic-scale interference patterns and the formation of a dxy-derived surface state is supported by first-principles calculations. Furthermore, we show that the apical oxygens on the topmost VO2 plane play a critical role in controlling the spectral weight of the observed coherent surface state.
  • Recently, noncentrosymmetric superconductor BiPd has attracted considerable research interest due to the possibility of hosting topological superconductivity. Here we report a systematic high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and spin-resolved ARPES study of the normal state electronic and spin properties of BiPd. Our experimental results show the presence of a surface state at higher-binding energy with the location of Dirac point at around 700 meV below the Fermi level. The detailed photon energy, temperature-dependent and spin-resolved ARPES measurements complemented by our first principles calculations demonstrate the existence of the spin polarized surface states at high-binding energy. The absence of such spin-polarized surface states near the Fermi level negates the possibility of a topological superconducting behavior on the surface. Our direct experimental observation of spin-polarized surface states in BiPd provides critical information that will guide the future search for topological superconductivity in noncentrosymmetric materials.
  • Topological insulators are attracting considerable interest due to their potential for technological applications and as platforms for exploring wide-ranging fundamental science questions. In order to exploit, fine-tune, control and manipulate the topological surface states, spectroscopic tools which can effectively probe their properties are of key importance. Here, we demonstrate that positrons provide a sensitive probe for topological states, and that the associated annihilation spectrum provides a new technique for characterizing these states. Firm experimental evidence for the existence of a positron surface state near Bi$_2$Te$_2$Se with a binding energy of $E_b = 2.7 \pm 0.2 \, \text{eV}$ is presented, and is confirmed by first-principles calculations. Additionally, the simulations predict a significant signal originating from annihilation with the topological surface states and shows the feasibility to detect their spin-texture through the use of spin-polarized positron beams.
  • Discovering Dirac fermions with novel properties has become an important front in condensed matter and materials sciences. Here, we report the observation of unusual Dirac fermion states in a strongly-correlated electron setting, which are uniquely distinct from those of graphene and conventional topological insulators. In strongly-correlated cerium monopnictides, we find two sets of highly anisotropic Dirac fermions that interpenetrate each other with negligible hybridization, and show a peculiar four-fold degeneracy where their Dirac nodes overlap. Despite the lack of protection by crystalline or time-reversal symmetries, this four-fold degeneracy is robust across magnetic phase transitions. Comparison of these experimental findings with our theoretical calculations suggests that the observed surface Dirac fermions arise from bulk band inversions at an odd number of high-symmetry points, which is analogous to the band topology which describes a $\mathbb{Z}_{2}$-topological phase. Our findings open up an unprecedented and long-sought-for platform for exploring novel Dirac fermion physics in a strongly-correlated semimetal.
  • We report theoretical and experimental discovery of Lorentz-violating Weyl fermion semimetal type-II state in the LaAlGe class of materials. Previously type-II Weyl state was predicted in WTe2 materials which remains unrealized in surface experiments. We show theoretically and experimentally that LaAlGe class of materials are the robust platforms for the study of type-II Weyl physics.
  • Superconductivity in topological band structures is a platform for many novel exotic quantum phenomena such as emergent supersymmetry. This potential nourishes the search for topological materials with intrinsic superconducting instabilities, in which Cooper pairing is introduced to electrons with helical spin texture such as the Dirac states of topological insulators and Dirac Semimetals, forming a natural topological superconductor of helical kind. We employ first-principles calculations, ARPES experiments and new theoretical analysis to reveal that PbTaSe2, a non-centrosymmetric superconductor, possesses a nonzero Z2 topological invariant and fully spin-polarized Dirac states. Moreover, we analyze the phonon spectrum of PbTaSe2 to show how superconductivity can emerge due to a stiffening of phonons by the Pb intercalation, which diminishes a competing charge-density-wave instability. Our work establishes PbTaSe2 as a stoichiometric superconductor with nontrivial Z2 topological band structure, and shows that it holds great promise for studying novel forms of topological superconductivity not realized previously.
  • The first-principles band theory paradigm has been a key player not only in the process of discovering new classes of topologically interesting materials, but also for identifying salient characteristics of topological states, enabling direct and sharpened confrontation between theory and experiment. We begin this review by discussing underpinnings of the topological band theory, which basically involves a layer of analysis and interpretation for assessing topological properties of band structures beyond the standard band theory construct. Methods for evaluating topological invariants are delineated, including crystals without inversion symmetry and interacting systems. The extent to which theoretically predicted properties and protections of topological states have been verified experimentally is discussed, including work on topological crystalline insulators, disorder/interaction driven topological insulators (TIs), topological superconductors, Weyl semimetal phases, and topological phase transitions. Successful strategies for new materials discovery process are outlined. A comprehensive survey of currently predicted 2D and 3D topological materials is provided. This includes binary, ternary and quaternary compounds, transition metal and f-electron materials, Weyl and 3D Dirac semimetals, complex oxides, organometallics, skutterudites and antiperovskites. Also included is the emerging area of 2D atomically thin films beyond graphene of various elements and their alloys, functional thin films, multilayer systems, and ultra-thin films of 3D TIs, all of which hold exciting promise of wide-ranging applications. We conclude by giving a perspective on research directions where further work will broadly benefit the topological materials field.
  • Positron Two Dimensional Angular Correlation of Annihilation Radiation (2D-ACAR) measurements reveal modifications of the electronic structure and composition at the surfaces of PbSe quantum dots (QDs), deposited as thin films, produced by various ligands containing either oxygen or nitrogen atoms. In particular, the 2D-ACAR measurements on thin films of colloidal PbSe QDs capped with oleic acid ligands yield an increased intensity in the electron momentum density (EMD) at high momenta compared to PbSe quantum dots capped with oleylamine. Moreover, the EMD of PbSe QDs is strongly affected by the small ethylediamine ligands, since these molecules lead to small distances between QDs and favor neck formation between near neighbor QDs, inducing electronic coupling between neighboring QDs. The high sensitivity to the presence of oxygen atoms at the surface can be also exploited to monitor the surface oxidation of PbSe QDs upon exposure to air. Our study clearly demonstrates that positron annihilation spectroscopy applied to thin films can probe surface transformations of colloidal semiconductor QDs embedded in functional layers.
  • The recent discovery of the first Weyl semimetal in TaAs provides the first observation of a Weyl fermion in nature and demonstrates a novel type of anomalous surface state, the Fermi arc. Like topological insulators, the bulk topological invariants of a Weyl semimetal are uniquely fixed by the surface states of a bulk sample. Here, we present a set of distinct conditions, accessible by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), each of which demonstrates topological Fermi arcs in a surface state band structure, with minimal reliance on calculation. We apply these results to TaAs and NbP. For the first time, we rigorously demonstrate a non-zero Chern number in TaAs by counting chiral edge modes on a closed loop. We further show that it is unreasonable to directly observe Fermi arcs in NbP by ARPES within available experimental resolution and spectral linewidth. Our results are general and apply to any new material to demonstrate a Weyl semimetal.
  • Weyl semimetals are expected to open up new horizons in physics and materials science because they provide the first realization of Weyl fermions and exhibit protected Fermi arc surface states. However, they had been found to be extremely rare in nature. Recently, a family of compounds, consisting of TaAs, TaP, NbAs and NbP was predicted as Weyl semimetal candidates. Here, we experimentally realize a Weyl semimetal state in TaP. Using photoemission spectroscopy, we directly observe the Weyl fermion cones and nodes in the bulk and the Fermi arcs on the surface. Moreover, we find that the surface states show an unexpectedly rich structure, including both topological Fermi arcs and several topologically-trivial closed contours in the vicinity of the Weyl points, which provides a promising platform to study the interplay between topological and trivial surface states on a Weyl semimetal's surface. We directly demonstrate the bulk-boundary correspondence and hence establish the topologically nontrivial nature of the Weyl semimetal state in TaP, by resolving the net number of chiral edge modes on a closed path that encloses the Weyl node. This also provides, for the first time, an experimentally practical approach to demonstrating a bulk Weyl fermion from a surface state dispersion measured in photoemission.
  • The recent discovery of the first Weyl semimetal in TaAs provides the first observation of a Weyl fermion in nature. Such a topological semimetal features a novel type of anomalous surface state, the Fermi arc, which connects a pair of Weyl nodes through the boundary of the crystal. Here, we present theoretical calculations of the quasi-particle interference (QPI) patterns that arise from the surface states including the topological Fermi arcs in the Weyl semimetals TaAs and NbP. Most importantly, we discover that the QPI exhibits termination-points that are fingerprints of the Weyl nodes in the interference pattern. Our results, for the first time, propose an interference signature of the topological Fermi arcs in TaAs, which provides important guidelines for STM measurements on this prototypical Weyl semimetal compound. The scattering channels presented here is relevant to transport phenomena on the surface of the TaAs class of Weyl semimetals. Our work is also the first systematic calculation of the quantum interferences from the Fermi arc surface states, which is in general useful for future STM studies on other Weyl semimetals.
  • Weyl semimetals may open a new era in condensed matter physics, materials science and nanotech after graphene and topological insulators. We report the first atomic scale view of the surface states of a Weyl semimetal (NbP) using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy. We observe coherent quantum interference patterns that arise from the scattering of quasiparticles near point defects on the surface. The measurements reveal the surface electronic structure both below and above the chemical potential in both real and reciprocal spaces. Moreover, the interference maps uncover the scattering processes of NbP's exotic surface states. Through comparison between experimental data and theoretical calculations, we further discover that the scattering channels are largely restricted by the orbital and/or spin texture of the surface band. The visualization of the scattering processes can help design novel transport effects and electronics on the topological surface of a Weyl semimetal.
  • A Weyl semimetal is a new state of matter that host Weyl fermions as quasiparticle excitations. The Weyl fermions at zero energy correspond to points of bulk band degeneracy, Weyl nodes, which are separated in momentum space and are connected only through the crystal's boundary by an exotic Fermi arc surface state. We experimentally measure the spin polarization of the Fermi arcs in the first experimentally discovered Weyl semimetal TaAs. Our spin data, for the first time, reveal that the Fermi arcs' spin polarization magnitude is as large as 80% and possesses a spin texture that is completely in-plane. Moreover, we demonstrate that the chirality of the Weyl nodes in TaAs cannot be inferred by the spin texture of the Fermi arcs. The observed non-degenerate property of the Fermi arcs is important for the establishment of its exact topological nature, which reveal that spins on the arc form a novel type of 2D matter. Additionally, the nearly full spin polarization we observed (~80%) may be useful in spintronic applications.
  • We present high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies of trivalent CeB6 and divalent BaB6 rare-earth hexaborides. We find that the Fermi surface electronic structure of CeB6 consists of large oval-shape pockets around the X points of the Brillouin zone, while the states around the zone centre 'Gamma' point are strongly renormalized. Our first-principles calculations agree with data around the X points, but not at the 'Gamma' points, indicating areas of strong renormalization located around 'Gamma'. The Ce quasi-particle states participate in formation of hotspots at the Fermi surface, while the incoherent f states hybridize and lead to the emergence of dispersive features absent in non-f counterpart BaB6. These experimental and theoretical results provide a new understanding of rare-earth hexaboride materials.
  • The recent experimental discovery of a Weyl semimetal in TaAs provides the first observation of a Weyl fermion in nature and demonstrates a novel type of anomalous surface state band structure, consisting of Fermi arcs. So far, work has focused on Weyl semimetals with strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC). However, Weyl semimetals with weak SOC may allow tunable spin-splitting for device applications and may exhibit a crossover to a spinless topological phase, such as a Dirac line semimetal in the case of spinless TaAs. NbP, isostructural to TaAs, may realize the first Weyl semimetal in the limit of weak SOC. Here we study the surface states of NbP by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and we find that we $\textit{cannot}$ show Fermi arcs based on our experimental data alone. We present an $\textit{ab initio}$ calculation of the surface states of NbP and we find that the Weyl points are too close and the Fermi level is too low to show Fermi arcs either by (1) directly measuring an arc or (2) counting chiralities of edge modes on a closed path. Nonetheless, the excellent agreement between our experimental data and numerical calculations suggests that NbP is a Weyl semimetal, consistent with TaAs, and that we observe trivial surface states which evolve continuously from the topological Fermi arcs above the Fermi level. Based on these results, we propose a slightly different criterion for a Fermi arc which, unlike (1) and (2) above, does not require us to resolve Weyl points or the spin splitting of surface states. We propose that raising the Fermi level by $> 20$ meV would make it possible to observe a Fermi arc using this criterion in NbP. Our work offers insight into Weyl semimetals with weak spin-orbit coupling, as well as the crossover from the spinful topological Weyl semimetal to the spinless topological Dirac line semimetal.
  • We have investigated spin reorientation phenomena and interaction driven effects under the presence of applied strains on the (001) surface of Pb$_{1-x}$Sn$_x$(Te, Se) topological crystalline insulators, which host multiple Dirac cones. Our analysis is based on a four-band $k\cdot p$ model, which captures the spin and orbital textures of the surface states at low energies around the $\bar{X}$ and $\bar{Y}$ points, including the Lifshitz transition. Even without breaking the time-reversal symmetry, we find that certain strains which break the mirror symmetry can induce hedgehog-like spin texture associated with gap formation at the Dirac points. The Chern number of the gapped surface ground state is shown to be tunable through the interplay of strains and a perpendicular Zeeman field. We also consider effects of strain in the presence of interactions in driving competing orders, and obtain the associated phase diagram at the mean-field level. Potential applications of our results for low power consuming electronics are discussed.