• We leverage new high-quality data from Hubble Space Telescope program GO-14164 to explore the variation in horizontal branch morphology among globular clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Our new observations lead to photometry with a precision commensurate with that available for the Galactic globular cluster population. Our analysis indicates that, once metallicity is accounted for, clusters in the LMC largely share similar horizontal branch morphologies regardless of their location within the system. Furthermore, the LMC clusters possess, on average, slightly redder morphologies than most of the inner halo Galactic population; we find, instead, that their characteristics tend to be more similar to those exhibited by clusters in the outer Galactic halo. Our results are consistent with previous studies showing a correlation between horizontal branch morphology and age.
  • The Canarias InfraRed Camera Experiment (CIRCE) is a near-infrared (1-2.5 micron) imager, polarimeter and low-resolution spectrograph operating as a visitor instrument for the Gran Telescopio Canarias 10.4-meter telescope. It was designed and built largely by graduate students and postdocs, with help from the UF astronomy engineering group, and is funded by the University of Florida and the U.S. National Science Foundation. CIRCE is intended to help fill the gap in near-infrared capabilities prior to the arrival of EMIR to the GTC, and will also provide the following scientific capabilities to compliment EMIR after its arrival: high-resolution imaging, narrowband imaging, high-time-resolution photometry, imaging polarimetry, low resolution spectroscopy. In this paper, we review the design, fabrication, integration, lab testing, and on-sky performance results for CIRCE. These include a novel approach to the opto-mechanical design, fabrication, and alignment.
  • We analyze Hubble Space Telescope observations of six globular clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud from program GO-14164 in Cycle 23. These are the deepest available observations of the LMC globular cluster population; their uniformity facilitates a precise comparison with globular clusters in the Milky Way. Measuring the magnitude of the main sequence turnoff point relative to template Galactic globular clusters allows the relative ages of the clusters to be determined with a mean precision of 8.4%, and down to 6% for individual objects. We find that the mean age of our LMC cluster ensemble is identical to the mean age of the oldest metal-poor clusters in the Milky Way halo to 0.2 $\pm$ 0.4 Gyr. This provides the most sensitive test to date of the synchronicity of the earliest epoch of globular cluster formation in two independent galaxies. Horizontal branch magnitudes and subdwarf fitting to the main sequence allow us to determine distance estimates for each cluster, and examine their geometric distribution in the LMC. Using two different methods, we find an average distance to the LMC of 18.52 $\pm$ 0.05.
  • We examine the properties of the Magellanic Bridge connecting the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds using ab-type RR Lyrae variables from the extensive dataset of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE), Phase IV data release. The metallicities of the RR Lyraes are determined from the characteristics of their light curves, with an average abundance of [Fe/H] = -1.790 +/- 0.011 (sem) in the Magellanic Bridge. From the individual reddenings of these stars, derived via their minimum light curve colors, we determined a median color excess of E(V-I) = 0.101 +/- 0.007 (sem) (implying E(B-V) $\approx$ 0.077). The peak distance modulus of 18.57 +/- 0.048 (sem) places the Bridge stars at distances between the two systems. The metallicity and distance distributions probe the structure of the Magellanic system as a whole, revealing a smooth transition that connects the galaxies. An examination of the HI content does not find a clear correlation between HI emission strength and RR Lyrae spatial distribution, suggesting that the old stellar populations may trace the overlapping halo distributions of the two Magellanic Clouds.
  • The UV-initiative Hubble Space Telescope Treasury survey of Galactic globular clusters provides a new window into the phenomena that shape the morphological features of the horizontal branch (HB). Using this large and homogeneous catalog of UV and blue photometry, we demonstrate that the HB exhibits discontinuities that are remarkably consistent in color (effective temperature). This consistency is apparent even among some of the most massive clusters hosting multiple distinct sub-populations (such as NGC 2808, omega Cen, and NGC 6715), demonstrating that these phenomena are primarily driven by atmospheric physics that is independent of the underlying population properties. However, inconsistencies arise in the metal-rich clusters NGC 6388 and NGC 6441, where the discontinuity within the blue HB (BHB) distribution shifts ~1,000 K to 2,000 K hotter. We demonstrate that this shift is likely due to a large helium enhancement in the BHB stars of these clusters, which in turn affects the surface convection and evolution of such stars. Our survey also increases the number of Galactic globular clusters known to host blue-hook stars (also known as late hot flashers) from 6 to 23 clusters. These clusters are biased toward the bright end of the globular cluster luminosity function, confirming that blue-hook stars tend to form in the most massive clusters with significant self-enrichment.
  • We have probed the pulsating variable star content of the isolated Local Group dwarf galaxy, DDO210 (Aquarius), using archival Advanced Camera for Surveys/$Hubble$ $Space$ $Telescope$ imaging in the F475W and F814W passbands. We find a total of 32 RR Lyrae stars (24 ab-type, 8 c-type) and 75 Cepheid variables. The mean periods of the ab-type and c-type RR Lyrae stars are calculated to be $\langle$P$_{\mathrm{ab}}\rangle = 0.609\pm0.011$ and $\langle$P$_{\mathrm{c}}\rangle = 0.359\pm0.025$ days, respectively. The light curve properties of the fundamental mode RR Lyrae stars yield a mean metallicity of $\langle$[Fe/H]$\rangle$ = -1.63$\pm$0.11 dex for this ancient population, consistent with a recent synthetic colour-magnitude diagram analysis. We find this galaxy to be Oosterhoff-intermediate and lacking in high-amplitude, short-period ab-type RR Lyrae, consistent with behavior recently observed for many dwarf spheroidals and ultra-faint dwarfs in the Local Group. We find a distance modulus of $\mu = 25.07\pm 0.12$ as determined by the RR Lyrae stars, slightly larger but agreeing with recent distance estimates from the red giant branch tip. We also find a sizable population of Cepheid variables in this galaxy. We provide evidence in favor of most if not all of these stars being short-period classical Cepheids. Assuming all of these stars to be classical Cepheids, we find that most of these Cepheids are $\sim$300 Myr old, with the youngest Cepheids being offset from the older Cepheids and the centre of the galaxy. We conclude that this may have resulted from a migration of star formation in DDO210.
  • We present new near-infrared Cepheid Period-Wesenheit relations in the LMC using time-series observations from the Large Magellanic Cloud Near-Infrared Synoptic Survey. We also derive optical$+$near-infrared P-W relations using $V$ and $I$~magnitudes from OGLE-III. We employ our new $JHK_s$ data to determine an independent distance to the LMC of $\mu_{\rm LMC} = 18.47\pm0.07 {\textit{(statistical)}}$~mag, using an absolute calibration of the Galactic relations based on several distance determination methods and accounting for the intrinsic scatter of each technique. We also derive new near-infrared Period-Luminosity and Wesenheit relations for Cepheids in M31 using observations from the PHAT survey. We use the absolute calibrations of the Galactic and LMC $W_{J,H}$ relations to determine the distance modulus of M31, $\mu_{\rm M31} = 24.46\pm0.20$~mag. We apply a simultaneous fit to Cepheids in several Local Group galaxies covering a range of metallicities ($7.7<12+\log[O/H]<8.6$~dex) to determine a global slope of -$3.244\pm0.016$~mag/dex for the $W_{J,K_s}$ relation and obtain robust distance estimates. Our distances are in good agreement with recent TRGB based distance estimates and we do not find any evidence for a metallicity dependence in the near-infrared P-W relations.
  • We present precision radial velocities and stellar population parameters for 77 star clusters in the Local Group galaxy M33. Our GTC and WHT observations sample both young, massive clusters and known/candidate globular clusters, spanning ages ~ 10^6 - 10^10 yr, and metallicities, [M/H] ~-1.7 to solar. The cluster system exhibits an age-metallicity relation; the youngest clusters are the most metal-rich. When compared to HI data, clusters with [M/H] ~ -1.0 and younger than ~ 4 Gyr are clearly identified as a disc population. The clusters show evidence for strong time evolution in the disc radial metallicity gradient (d[M/H]dt / dR = 0.03 dex/kpc/Gyr). The oldest clusters have stronger, more negative gradients than the youngest clusters in M33. The clusters also show a clear age-velocity dispersion relation. The line of sight velocity dispersions of the clusters increases with age similar to Milky Way open clusters and stars. The general shape of the relation is reproduced by disc heating simulations, and the similarity between the relations in M33 and the Milky Way suggests that heating by substructure, and cooling of the ISM both play a role in shaping this relation. We identify 12 "classical" GCs, six of which are newly identified GC candidates. The GCs are more metal-rich than Milky Way halo clusters, and show weak rotation. The inner (R < 4.5 kpc) GCs exhibit a steep radial metallicity gradient (d[M/H]/dR = -0.29+-0.11 dex/kpc) and an exponential-like surface density profile. We argue that these inner GCs are thick disc rather than halo objects.
  • We have tested the reliability of the red giant branch (RGB) as a metallicity indicator accounting for observational errors as well as the complexity of star formation histories (SFHs) and chemical evolution histories observed in various stellar systems. We generate model color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) produced with a variety of evolutionary histories and compare the resultant metallicity estimates from the colors and magnitudes of RGB stars to the true input metallicities. We include realistic models for photometric errors and completeness in our synthetic CMDs. As expected, for simple simple stellar populations dominated by old stars, the RGB provides a very accurate estimate of the modular metallicity value for a population. An error in the age of a system targeted for this type of study may produce metallicity errors of a few tenths of a dex. The size of this metallicity error depends linearly on the age error, and we find this dependence to be stronger with more precise photometry. If the population has experienced any significant star formation within the last $\sim$6 Gyr, the metallicity estimates, [M/H], derived from the RGB may be in error by up to $\sim$0.5 dex. Perhaps the most important consideration for this technique is an accurate, independent estimate of the average age for the target stellar system, especially if it is probable that a significant fraction of the population formed less than $\sim$6 Gyr ago.
  • We construct a stellar cluster catalog for the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey using image classifications collected from the Andromeda Project citizen science website. We identify 2,753 clusters and 2,270 background galaxies within ~0.5 deg$^2$ of PHAT imaging searched, or ~400 kpc$^2$ in deprojected area at the distance of the Andromeda galaxy (M31). These identifications result from 1.82 million classifications of ~20,000 individual images (totaling ~7 gigapixels) by tens of thousands of volunteers. We show that our crowd-sourced approach, which collects >80 classifications per image, provides a robust, repeatable method of cluster identification. The high spatial resolution Hubble Space Telescope images resolve individual stars in each cluster and are instrumental in the factor of ~6 increase in the number of clusters known within the survey footprint. We measure integrated photometry in six filter passbands, ranging from the near-UV to the near-IR. PHAT clusters span a range of ~8 magnitudes in F475W (g-band) luminosity, equivalent to ~4 decades in cluster mass. We perform catalog completeness analysis using >3000 synthetic cluster simulations to determine robust detection limits and demonstrate that the catalog is 50% complete down to ~500 solar masses for ages <100 Myr. We include catalogs of clusters, background galaxies, remaining unselected candidates, and synthetic cluster simulations, making all information publicly available to the community. The catalog published here serves as the definitive base data product for PHAT cluster science, providing a census of star clusters in an L$^*$ spiral galaxy with unmatched sensitivity and quality.
  • Current generation stellar isochrone models exhibit non-negligible discrepancies due to variations in the input physics. The success of each model is determined by how well it fits the observations, and this paper aims to disentangle contributions from the various physical inputs. New deep, wide-field optical and near-infrared photometry ($UBVRIJHK_S$) of the cluster M35 is presented, against which several isochrone systems are compared: Padova, PARSEC, Dartmouth and Y$^2$. Two different atmosphere models are applied to each isochrone: ATLAS9 and BT-Settl. For any isochrone set and atmosphere model, observed data are accurately reproduced for all stars more massive then $0.7$ M$_\odot$. For stars less massive than 0.7 M$_\odot$, Padova and PARSEC isochrones consistently produce higher temperatures than observed. Dartmouth and Y$^2$ isochrones with BT-Settl atmospheres reproduce optical data accurately, however they appear too blue in IR colors. It is speculated that molecular contributions to stellar spectra in the near-infrared may not be fully explored, and that future study may reconcile these differences.
  • We present the first detailed study of the RR Lyrae variable population in the Local Group dSph/dIrr transition galaxy, Phoenix, using previously obtained HST/WFPC2 observations of the galaxy. We utilize template light curve fitting routines to obtain best fit light curves for RR Lyrae variables in Phoenix. Our technique has identified 78 highly probable RR Lyrae stars (54 ab-type; 24 c-type) with about 40 additional candidates. We find mean periods for the two populations of $\langle P_{ab}\rangle = 0.60 \pm 0.03$ days and $\langle P_{c}\rangle = 0.353 \pm 0.002$ days. We use the properties of these light curves to extract, among other things, a metallicity distribution function for ab-type RR Lyrae. Our analysis yields a mean metallicity of $\langle [Fe/H]\rangle = -1.68 \pm 0.06$ dex for the RRab stars. From the mean period and metallicity calculated from the ab-type RR Lyrae, we conclude that Phoenix is more likely of intermediate Oosterhoff type; however the morphology of the Bailey diagram for Phoenix RR Lyraes appears similar to that of an Oosterhoff type I system. Using the RRab stars, we also study the chemical enrichment law for Phoenix. We find that our metallicity distribution is reasonably well fitted by a closed-box model. The parameters of this model are compatible with the findings of Hidalgo et al. (2009) further supporting the idea that Phoenix appears to have been chemically enriched as a closed-box-like system during the early stage of its formation and evolution.
  • We present the results of our analysis of the RR Lyrae (RRL) variable stars detected in two transition-type dwarf galaxies (dTrans), ESO294-G010 and ESO410-G005 in the Sculptor group, which is known to be one of the closest neighboring galaxy groups to our Local Group. Using deep archival images from the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we have identified a sample of RR Lyrae candidates in both dTrans galaxies [219 RRab (RR0) and 13 RRc (RR1) variables in ESO294-G010; 225 RRab and 44 RRc stars in ESO410-G005]. The metallicities of the individual RRab stars are calculated via the period-amplitude-[Fe/H] relation derived by Alcock et al. This yields mean metallicities of <[Fe/H]>_{ESO294} = -1.77 +/- 0.03 and <[Fe/H]>_{ESO410} = -1.64 +/- 0.03. The RRL metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) are investigated further via simple chemical evolution models; these reveal the relics of the early chemical enrichment processes for these two dTrans galaxies. In the case of both galaxies, the shapes of the RRL MDFs are well-described by pre-enrichment models. This suggests two possible channels for the early chemical evolution for these Sculptor group dTrans galaxies: 1) The ancient stellar populations of our target dwarf galaxies might have formed from the star forming gas which was already enriched through "prompt initial enrichment" or an "initial nucleosynthetic spike" from the very first massive stars, or 2) this pre-enrichment state might have been achieved by the end products from more evolved systems of their nearest neighbor, NGC 55.
  • In this study we compare the photometric data of 34 Milky Way globular clusters, observed within the ACS Treasury Program (PI: Ata Sarajedini) with the corresponding ground-based data, provided by the Photometric Standard Field Catalogs of Stetson (2000, 2005). We focus on the transformation between the HST/ACS F606W to V-band and F814W to I-band only. The goal is to assess the validity of the filter transformation equations by Sirianni et al.(2005) with respect to their dependence on metallicity, Horizontal Branch morphology, mass and integrated (V-I) colour of the various globular clusters. Such a dependence is expected due to the fact that the transformation equations are based on the observations of only one globular cluster, i.e., NGC 2419. Surprisingly, the correlation between offset and metallicity is found to be weak, with a low level significance. The correlation between offset and Horizontal Branch structure, as well as total cluster mass is still weaker. Based on the available data we do not find the photometric offset to be linked to multiple stellar populations, e.g., as found in NGC 0288, NGC 1851, and NGC 5139. The results of this study show that there are small systematic offsets between the transformed ACS- and observed ground based photometry, and that these are only weakly correlated, if at all, with various cluster parameters and their underlying stellar populations. As a result, investigators wishing to transform globular cluster photometry from the Sirianni et al.(2005) ground-based V, I system onto the Stetson (2000) system simply need to add 0.040 (+/-0.012) to the V-band magnitudes and 0.047 (+/-0.011) to the I-band magnitudes. This in turn means that the transformed ACS (V-I) colours match the ground-based values from Stetson (2000) to within ~0.01 mag.
  • We have conducted a near-infrared spectroscopic survey of 47 candidate counterparts to X-ray sources discovered by the Chandra X-ray Observatory near the Galactic Center (GC). Though a significant number of these astrometric matches are likely to be spurious, we sought out spectral characteristics of active stars and interacting binaries, such as hot, massive spectral types or emission lines in order to corroborate the X-ray activity and certify the authenticity of the match. We present three new spectroscopic identifications, including a Be high mass X-ray binary (HMXB) or a gamma Cassiopeiae (Cas) system, a symbiotic X-ray binary and an O-type star of unknown luminosity class. The Be HMXB/gamma Cas system and the symbiotic X-ray binary are the first of their classes to be spectroscopically identified in the GC region.
  • We present results from a study of ab-type RR Lyrae variables in the Large Magellanic Cloud using the extensive dataset from phase III of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE). The metallicities of the RR Lyraes, determined from the periods and amplitudes of their light curves, reveal a statistically significant radial abundance gradient that is approximately one-half of what is seen in the disks of the Milky Way and M33. The RR Lyrae abundance gradient agrees with that of the old and metal-poor LMC globular clusters. The reddenings of the OGLE RR Lyraes have been calculated using their minimum light colors and reveal a mean value of E(V-I) = 0.12 +/- 0.05, where the quoted uncertainty represents the standard deviation of the mean. The distribution of RR Lyrae extinctions across the face of the LMC is well-correlated with the distribution and emission intensity of CO clouds based on recent millimeter wave surveys. In addition, we find that the old LMC globulars tend to be located in regions of low extinction. This underscores the need to survey the higher extinction regions with the specific aim of increasing the sample of old LMC globular clusters. Finally, we examine the distance distribution of the RR Lyraes in order to probe the structure of the LMC and investigate the possibility that some of the RR Lyraes may reside in a kinematically hot halo population. In addition to calculating a mean LMC distance of (m-M)o = 18.55 +/- 0.10 mag, we conclude that some fraction of the RR Lyraes in our sample could be members of the LMC halo.
  • (abridged) We use newly available empirical binary fractions for globular clusters to carry out a direct test of the binary evolution hypothesis, and of collisional channels that involve binary stars. More specifically, using the previously reported correlation between blue straggler numbers and core mass as a benchmark, we test for correlations with the number of binary stars, as well as with the rates of single-single, single-binary, and binary-binary encounters. Surprisingly, we find that the simple correlation with core mass remains by far the strongest predictor of blue straggler population size, even in our joint models. This is despite the fact that the binary fractions themselves strongly anti-correlate with core mass, just as expected in the binary evolution model. At first sight, these results do not fit neatly with either binary evolution or collisional models in their simplest forms. Arguably the simplest and most intriguing possibility to explain this unexpected result is that observational errors on the core binary fractions are larger than the true intrinsic dispersion associated with their dependence on core mass. In the context of the binary evolution model, this would explain why the combination of binary fraction and core mass is a poorer predictor of blue straggler numbers than core mass alone. It would also imply that core mass is a remarkably clean predictor of core binary fractions. This would be of considerable importance for the dynamical evolution of globular clusters, and provides an important benchmark for models attempting to understand their present-day properties.
  • We present time-series photometry of two fields near M32 using archival observations from ACS/WFC onboard HST. One field is centered about 2 arcmin from M32 while the other is located 15 arcmin to the southeast of M31. We identify a total of 1139 RR Lyrae variables of which 821 are ab-type and 318 are c-type. In the field near M32, we find a radial gradient in the density of RR Lyraes relative to the center of M32. This gradient is consistent with the surface brightness profile of M32 suggesting that a significant number of the RR Lyraes in this region belong to M32. This provides further confirmation that M32 contains an ancient stellar population formed around the same time as the oldest population in M31 and the Milky Way. The RR Lyrae stars in M32 exhibit a mean metal abundance of [Fe/H] ~ -1.42 +/- 0.02, which is ~15 times lower than the metal abundance of the overall M32 stellar population. Moreover, the abundance of RR Lyrae stars normalized to the luminosity of M32 in the field analyzed further indicates that the ancient metal-poor population in M32 represents only a very minor component of this galaxy, consistent with the 1% to 4.5% in mass inferred from the CMD analysis of Monachesi et al. In the other field, we find unprecedented evidence for two populations of RR Lyraes in M31 as shown by two distinct sequences among the ab-type variables in the Bailey Diagram. When interpreted in terms of metal abundance, one population exhibits a peak at [Fe/H] ~ -1.3 and the other is at [Fe/H] ~ -1.9. One possible interpretation of this result is that the more metal-rich population represents the dominant M31 halo, while the metal-poorer group could be a disrupted dwarf satellite galaxy orbiting M31. If true, this represents a further indication that the formation of the M31 spheroid has been significantly influenced by the merger and accretion of dwarf galaxy satellites. [abridged]
  • We present the morphological properties of 161 star clusters in M33 using the Advanced Camera For Surveys Wide Field Channel onboard the Hubble Space Telescope using observations with the F606W and F814W filters. We obtain, for the first time, ellipticities, position angles, and surface brightness profiles for a significant number of clusters. On average, M33 clusters are more flattened than those of the Milky Way and M31, and more similar to clusters in the Small Magellanic Cloud. The ellipticities do not show any correlation with age or mass, suggesting that rotation is not the main cause of elongation in the M33 clusters. The position angles of the clusters show a bimodality with a strong peak perpendicular to the position angle of the galaxy major axis. These results support the notion that tidal forces are the reason for the cluster flattening. We fit King and EFF models to the surface brightness profiles and derive structural parameters including core radii, concentration, half-light radii and central surface brightness for both filters. The surface brightness profiles of a significant number of clusters show irregularities such as bumps and dips. Young clusters (Log age < 8) are notably better fitted by models with no radial truncation (EFF models), while older clusters show no significant differences between King or EFF fits. M33 star clusters seem to have smaller sizes, smaller concentrations, and smaller central surface brightness as compared to clusters in the MW, M31, LMC and SMC. Analysis of the structural parameters presents a age-radius relation also detected in other star cluster systems. The overall analysis shows differences in the structural evolution between the M33 cluster system and cluster systems in nearby galaxies. These differences could have been caused by the strong differences in these various environments.
  • The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey is an on-going Hubble Space Telescope (HST) multi-cycle program to obtain high spatial resolution imaging of one-third of the M31 disk at ultraviolet through near-infrared wavelengths. In this paper, we present the first installment of the PHAT stellar cluster catalog. When completed, the PHAT cluster catalog will be among the largest and most comprehensive surveys of resolved star clusters in any galaxy. The exquisite spatial resolution achieved with HST has allowed us to identify hundreds of new clusters that were previously inaccessible with existing ground-based surveys. We identify 601 clusters in the Year 1 sample, representing more than a factor of four increase over previous catalogs within the current survey area (390 arcmin^2). This work presents results derived from the first \sim25% of the survey data; we estimate that the final sample will include \sim2500 clusters. For the Year 1 objects, we present a catalog with positions, radii, and six-band integrated photometry. Along with a general characterization of the cluster luminosities and colors, we discuss the cluster luminosity function, the cluster size distributions, and highlight a number of individually interesting clusters found in the Year 1 search.
  • We present a new technique to quantify cluster-to-cluster variations in the observed present-day stellar mass functions of a large sample of star clusters. Our method quantifies these differences as a function of both the stellar mass and the total cluster mass, and offers the advantage that it is insensitive to the precise functional form of the mass function. We applied our technique to data taken from the ACS Survey for Globular Clusters, from which we obtained completeness-corrected stellar mass functions in the mass range 0.25-0.75 M$_{\odot}$ for a sample of 27 clusters. The results of our observational analysis were then compared to Monte Carlo simulations for globular cluster evolution spanning a range of initial mass functions, total numbers of stars, concentrations, and virial radii. We show that the present-day mass functions of the clusters in our sample can be reproduced by assuming an universal initial mass function for all clusters, and that the cluster-to-cluster differences are consistent with what is expected from two-body relaxation. A more complete exploration of the initial cluster conditions will be needed in future studies to better constrain the precise functional form of the initial mass function. This study is a first step toward using our technique to constrain the dynamical histories of a large sample of old Galactic star clusters and, by extension, star formation in the early Universe.
  • We present a study of the stellar populations in two faint M31 dwarf satellites, Andromeda XI and Andromeda XIII. Using archival images from the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we characterize the horizontal branch (HB) morphologies and the RR Lyrae (RRL) populations of these two faint dwarf satellites. Our new template light curve fitting routine (RRFIT) has been used to detect and characterize RRL populations in both galaxies. The mean periods of RRab (RR0) stars in And XI and And XIII are $<P_{ab}>$=0.621 $\pm$ 0.026 (error1) $\pm$ 0.022 (error2), and $<P_{ab}>$=0.648 $\pm$ 0.026 (error1) $\pm$ 0.022 (error2) respectively, where "error1" represents the standard error of the mean, while "error2" is based on our synthetic light curve simulations. The RRL populations in these galaxies show a lack of RRab stars with high amplitudes ($Amp(V) > 1.0 $ mag) and relatively short periods ($P_{ab}$ $\sim$ 0.5 days), yet their period -- V band amplitude (P-Amp(V)) relations track the relation defined by the M31 field halo RRL populations at $\sim$ 11 kpc from the center of M31. The metallicities of the RRab stars are calculated via a relationship between [Fe/H], Log P$_{ab}$, and Amp(V). The resultant abundances ($[Fe/H]_{And XI}=-1.75$; $[Fe/H]_{And XIII}=-1.74$) are consistent with the values calculated from the RGB slope indicating that our measurements are not significantly affected by RRL evolutionary away from the zero age horizontal branch. The distance to each galaxy, based on the absolute V magnitudes of the RRab stars, is $(m-M)_{0,V}$=24.33 $\pm$ 0.05 for And XI and $(m-M)_{0,V}$=24.62 $\pm$ 0.05 for And XIII. We discuss the origins of And XI and And XIII based on a comparative analysis of the luminosity-metallicity (L-M) relation of Local Group dwarf galaxies.
  • We use observations from the ACS study of Galactic globular clusters to investigate the spatial distribution of the inner regions of the disrupting Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy (Sgr). We combine previously published analyses of four Sgr member clusters located near or in the Sgr core (M54, Arp 2, Terzan 7 and Terzan 8) with a new analysis of diffuse Sgr material identified in the background of five low-latitude Galactic bulge clusters (NGC 6624, 6637, 6652, 6681 and 6809) observed as part of the ACS survey. By comparing the bulge cluster CMDs to our previous analysis of the M54/Sgr core, we estimate distances to these background features. The combined data from four Sgr member clusters and five Sgr background features provides nine independent measures of the Sgr distance and, as a group, provide uniformly measured and calibrated probes of different parts of the inner regions of Sgr spanning twenty degrees over the face of the disrupting dwarf. This allows us, for the first time, to constrain the three dimensional orientation of Sgr's disrupting core and globular cluster system and compare that orientation to the predictions of an N-body model of tidal disruption. The density and distance of Sgr debris is consistent with models that favor a relatively high Sgr core mass and a slightly greater distance (28-30 kpc, with a mean of 29.4 kpc). Our analysis also suggests that M54 is in the foreground of Sgr by ~2 kpc, projected on the center of the Sgr dSph. While this would imply a remarkable alignment of the cluster and the Sgr nucleus along the line of sight, we can not identify any systematic effect in our analysis that would falsely create the measured 2 kpc separation. Finally, we find that the cluster Terzan 7 has the most discrepant distance (25 kpc) among the four Sgr core clusters, which may suggest a different dynamical history than the other Sgr core clusters.
  • The properties of RR Lyrae variables make them excellent probes of the formation and evolution of a stellar population. The mere presence of such stars necessitates an age greater than ~10 Gyr while their periods and amplitudes can be used to estimate the metal abundance of the cluster or galaxy in which they reside. These and other features of RR Lyraes have been used to study the properties of M31 and M33. Though these studies are generally in their infancy, we have established that M31 and M33 do indeed harbor RR Lyraes in their halos and probably also in their disks suggesting that these two components formed early in the history of M31 and M33. The mean metallicities of the halo RR Lyraes in these galaxies are consistent with those of other halo stellar population tracers such as the dwarf spheroidal satellites of M31 and the halo globular clusters in M33. Little is known about the spatial distribution of the RR Lyraes, especially in M33. This will require wide-field time-series studies with sufficient photometric depth to allow both the identification of RR Lyraes and robust period determination.
  • We present new measurements of the centers for 65 Milky Way globular clusters. Centers were determined by fitting ellipses to the density distribution within the inner $2\arcmin$ of the cluster center, and averaging the centers of these ellipses. The symmetry of clusters was also analyzed by comparing cumulative radial distributions on opposite sides of the cluster across a grid of trial centers. All of the determinations were done with stellar positions derived from a combination of two single-orbit ACS images of the core of the cluster in $F606W$ and $F814W$. We find that the ellipse-fitting method provides remarkable accuracy over a wide range of core sizes and density distributions, while the symmetry method is difficult to use on clusters with very large cores, or low density. The symmetry method requires a larger field, or a very sharply peaked density distribution.