• We show that in decaying hydromagnetic turbulence with initial kinetic helicity, a weak magnetic field eventually becomes fully helical. The sign of magnetic helicity is opposite to that of the kinetic helicity - regardless of whether or not the initial magnetic field was helical. The magnetic field undergoes inverse cascading with the magnetic energy decaying approximately like t^{-1/2}. This is even slower than in the fully helical case, where it decays like t^{-2/3}. In this parameter range, the product of magnetic energy and correlation length raised to a certain power slightly larger than unity, is approximately constant. This scaling of magnetic energy persists over long time scales. At very late times and for domain sizes large enough to accommodate the growing spatial scales, we expect a cross-over to the t^{-2/3} decay law that is commonly observed for fully helical magnetic fields. Regardless of the presence or absence of initial kinetic helicity, the magnetic field experiences exponential growth during the first few turnover times, which is suggestive of small-scale dynamo action. Our results have applications to a wide range of experimental dynamos and astrophysical time-dependent plasmas, including primordial turbulence in the early universe.
  • The relation between magnetic and velocity fields in the solar atmosphere is a topic that can now be addressed quantitatively at the statistical level. Here we analyze kinetic energy and cross helicity spectra along with magnetic energy and helicity spectra in two solar active regions using vector magnetograms and Dopplergrams of NOAA~11158 and 12266. Within these active regions, we find similar slopes for kinetic and magnetic energy spectra at intermediate wavenumbers, where the contribution from the granulation velocity has been removed. At wavenumbers around $0.3\Mm^{-1}$, the magnetic helicity is found to be close to its maximal value. The cross helicity spectra are found to be within about 10\% of the maximum possible value. We also develop a two-scale method for cross helicity spectra, which allows us to take the cancellation from the bipolarity of active regions into account. In the quiet Sun, by comparison, the cross helicity spectrum is found to be small.
  • Using a recently developed two-scale formalism to determine the magnetic helicity spectrum (Brandenburg et al. 2017), we analyze synoptic vector magnetograms built with data from the Vector Spectromagnetograph (VSM) instrument on the \emph{Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun} (SOLIS) telescope during January 2010-July 2016. In contrast to an earlier study using only three Carrington rotations, our analysis includes 74 synoptic Carrington rotation maps. We recover here bihelical spectra at different phases of solar cycle~24, where the net magnetic helicity in the majority of the data is consistent with a large-scale dynamo with helical turbulence operating in the Sun. More than $20\%$ of the analyzed maps, however, show violations of the expected sign rule.
  • We investigate the statistical properties of isotropic, stochastic, Gaussian distributed, helical magnetic fields characterized by different shapes of the energy spectra at large length scales and study the associated realizability condition. We discuss smoothed magnetic fields that are commonly used when the primordial magnetic field is constrained by observational data. We are particularly interested in scale-invariant magnetic fields that can be generated during the inflationary stage by quantum fluctuations. We determine the correlation length of such magnetic fields and relate it to the infrared cutoff of perturbations produced during inflation. We show that this scale determines the observational signatures of the inflationary magnetic fields on the cosmic microwave background. At smaller scales, the scale-invariant spectrum changes with time. It becomes a steeper weak-turbulence spectrum at progressively larger scales. We show numerically that the critical length scale where this happens is the turbulent-diffusive scale, which increases with the square root of time.
  • Using direct numerical simulations (DNS), we study laminar and turbulent dynamos in chiral magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) with an extended set of equations that accounts for an additional contribution to the electric current due to the chiral magnetic effect (CME). This quantum phenomenon originates from an asymmetry between left- and right-handed relativistic fermions in the presence of a magnetic field and gives rise to a chiral dynamo. We show that the magnetic field evolution proceeds in three stages: (1) a small-scale chiral dynamo instability; (2) production of chiral magnetically driven turbulence and excitation of a large-scale dynamo instability due to a new chiral effect (alpha_mu effect); and (3) saturation of magnetic helicity and magnetic field growth controlled by a conservation law for the total chirality. The alpha_mu effect becomes dominant at large fluid and magnetic Reynolds numbers and is not related to kinetic helicity. The growth rate of the large-scale magnetic field and its characteristic scale measured in the numerical simulations agree well with theoretical predictions based on mean-field theory. The previously discussed two-stage chiral magnetic scenario did not include stage (2) during which the characteristic scale of magnetic field variations can increase by many orders of magnitude. Based on the findings from numerical simulations, the relevance of the CME and the chiral effects revealed in the relativistic plasma of the early Universe and of proto-neutron stars are discussed.
  • An asymmetry in the number density of left- and right-handed fermions is known to give rise to a new term in the induction equation that can result in a small-scale instability. This is a microphysical effect characterised by a chiral chemical potential and is mathematically similar to the alpha effect, which is a turbulent or macrophysical effect. At high temperatures, when a chiral asymmetry can survive for long enough, these chiral MHD dynamos can amplify magnetic fields efficiently, which in turn drive turbulence via the Lorentz force. While it has been demonstrated in numerical simulations that chiral magnetically driven turbulence exists and modifies the evolution of the plasma, the details of this process remain unclear. The goal of this paper is to shed new light on the properties of chiral magnetically driven turbulence using numerical simulations with the Pencil Code. We explore the generation of turbulence for different initial conditions, including a variation of the initial chiral chemical potential and the magnetic Prandtl number, Pm. In particular, we determine the ratio of kinetic to magnetic energy, Upsilon^2, that can be reached in chiral magnetically driven turbulence. Within the parameter space explored in this study, Upsilon reaches a value of approximately 0.24-0.29 - independently of the initial chiral asymmetry and for Pm=1. Our simulations suggest, that Upsilon decreases as a power law when increasing Pm. While the exact scaling depends on the details of the fitting criteria and the Reynolds number regime, an approximate result of Upsilon(Pm)=0.3*Pm^{-0.2} is reported. Using the findings from our numerical simulations, we estimate the properties of chiral magnetically driven turbulence in the early Universe.
  • High precision photometry of solar-like members of the open cluster M67 with Kepler/K2 data has recently revealed enhanced activity for stars with a large Rossby number, which is the ratio of rotation period to the convective turnover time. Contrary to the well established behavior for shorter rotation periods and smaller Rossby numbers, the chromospheric activity of the more slowly rotating stars of M67 was found to increase with increasing Rossby number. Such behavior has never been reported before, although it was theoretically predicted to emerge as a consequence of antisolar differential rotation (DR) for stars with Rossby numbers larger than that of the Sun, because in those models the absolute value of the DR was found to exceed that for solar-like DR. Using gyrochronological relations and an approximate age of 4 Gyr for the members of M67, we compare with computed rotation rates using just the B-V color. The resulting rotation--activity relation is found to be compatible with that obtained by employing the measured rotation rate. This provides additional support for the unconventional enhancement of activity at comparatively low rotation rates and the possible presence of antisolar differential rotation.
  • Recent advances in mean-field theory are reviewed and applications to the Sun, late-type stars, accretion disks, galaxies, and the early Universe are discussed. We focus particularly on aspects of spatio-temporal nonlocality, which is one of the main insights that emerged from applying the test-field method to magnetic fields of different length and timescales. We also review the status of nonlinear quenching and the relation to magnetic helicity, which is an important observational diagnostic of modern solar dynamo theory. Both solar and some stellar dynamos seem to operate in an intermediate regime that has not yet been possible to model successfully. This regime is bracketed by antisolar-like differential rotation on one end and stellar activity cycles belonging to the superactive stars on the other. The difficulty in modeling this regime may be related to shortcomings in modelling solar/stellar convection. On galactic and extragalactic length scales, the observational constraints are still less stringent and uncertain, but recent advances both in theory and in observations suggest that more conclusive comparisons may soon be possible. The possibility of inversely cascading magnetic helicity throughout all of the early Universe is particularly exciting in explaining the lower limits of magnetic fields on cosmological length scales and the possibility of parity breaking and finite helicity of such a field.
  • We consider a scale-invariant helical magnetic field generated during inflation. We show that, if the mean magnetic helicity density of such a field is measured, it can be used to determine a lower bound on the duration of inflation. Upper bounds can be used to derive constraints on the minimal duration of inflation if one assumes that the magnetic field generated during inflation is helical. Using three-dimensional simulations, we show that an initially scale-invariant field develops, which is similar both with and without magnetic helicity. In the fully helical case, however, the magnetic field appears to have a more pronounced folded structure.
  • We present new simulations of decaying hydromagnetic turbulence for a relativistic equation of state relevant to the early universe. We compare helical and nonhelical cases either with kinetically or magnetically dominated initial fields. Both kinetic and magnetic initial helicities lead to maximally helical magnetic fields after some time, but with different temporal decay laws. Both are relevant to the early universe, although no mechanisms have yet been identified that produce magnetic helicity with strengths comparable to the big bang nucleosynthesis limit at scales comparable to the Hubble horizon at the electroweak phase transition. Nonhelical magnetically dominated fields could still produce picoGauss magnetic fields under most optimistic conditions. Only helical magnetic fields can potentially have nanoGauss strengths at scales up to 30 kpc today.
  • The formation of sunspots requires the concentration of magnetic flux near the surface. The negative magnetic pressure instability (NEMPI) might be a possible mechanism for accomplishing this, but it has mainly been studied in simple systems using an isothermal equation of state without a natural free surface. We study NEMPI in a stratified Cartesian mean-field model where turbulence effects are parameterized. We use an ideal equation of state and include radiation transport, which establishes selfconsistently a free surface. We use a Kramers-type opacity with adjustable exponents chosen such that the deeper layers are approximately isentropic. No convection is therefore possible in this model, allowing us to study NEMPI with radiation in isolation. We restrict ourselves to two-dimensional models. We use artificially enhanced mean-field coefficients to allow NEMPI to develop, making it therefore possible to study the reason why it is much harder to excite in the presence of radiation. NEMPI yields moderately strong magnetic flux concentrations a certain distance beneath the surface where optical depth is unity. The instability is oscillatory and in the form of upward travelling waves. This seems to be a new effect that has not been found in earlier models without radiative transport. The horizontal wavelength is about ten times smaller than what has been found previously in more idealized isothermal models. In our models, NEMPI saturates at field strengths too low to explain sunspots. Furthermore, the structures appear too narrow and too far beneath the surface to cause significant brightness variations at the radiative surface. We speculate that the failure to reproduce effects resembling sunspots may be related to the neglect of convection.
  • We present numerical simulations of hydrodynamic overshooting convection in local Cartesian domains. We find that a substantial fraction of the lower part of the convection zone (CZ) is stably stratified according to the Schwarzschild criterion while the enthalpy flux is outward directed. This occurs when the heat conduction profile at the bottom of the CZ is smoothly varying, based either on a Kramers-like opacity prescription as a function of temperature and density or a static profile of a similar shape. We show that the subadiabatic layer arises due to nonlocal energy transport by buoyantly driven downflows in the upper parts of the CZ. Analysis of the force balance of the upflows and downflows confirms that convection is driven by cooling at the surface. We find that the commonly used prescription for the convective enthalpy flux being proportional to the negative entropy gradient does not hold in the stably stratified layers where the flux is positive. We demonstrate the existence of a non-gradient contribution to the enthalpy flux, which is estimated to be important throughout the convective layer. A quantitative analysis of downflows indicates a transition from a tree-like structure where smaller downdrafts merge into larger ones in the upper parts to a structure in the deeper parts where a height-independent number of strong downdrafts persist. This change of flow topology occurs when a substantial subadiabatic layer is present in the lower part of the CZ.
  • The presence of asymmetry between fermions of opposite handedness in plasmas of relativistic particles can lead to exponential growth of a helical magnetic field via a small-scale chiral dynamo instability known as the chiral magnetic effect. Here, we show, using dimensional arguments and numerical simulations, that this process produces through the Lorentz force chiral magnetically driven turbulence. A k^{-2} magnetic energy spectrum emerges via inverse transfer over a certain range of wavenumbers k. The total chirality (magnetic helicity plus normalized chiral chemical potential) is conserved in this system. Therefore, as the helical magnetic field grows, most of the total chirality gets transferred into magnetic helicity until the chiral magnetic effect terminates. Quantitative results for height, slope, and extent of the spectrum are obtained. Consequences of this effect for cosmic magnetic fields are discussed.
  • A turbulent dynamo in spherical geometry with an outer corona is simulated to study the sign of magnetic helicity in the outer parts. In agreement with earlier studies, the sign in the outer corona is found to be opposite to that inside the dynamo. Line-of-sight observations of polarized emission are synthesized to explore the feasibility of using the local reduction of Faraday depolarization to infer the sign of helicity of magnetic fields in the solar corona. This approach was previously identified as an observational diagnostic in the context of galactic magnetic fields. Based on our simulations, we show that this method can be successful in the solar context if sufficient statistics is gathered by using averages over ring segments in the corona separately for the regions north and south of the solar equator.
  • The magnetic activity of the Sun becomes stronger and weaker over roughly an 11 year cycle, modulating the radiation and charged particle environment experienced by the Earth as "space weather". Decades of observations from the Mount Wilson Observatory have revealed that other stars also show regular activity cycles in their Ca II H+K line emission, and identified two different relationships between the length of the cycle and the rotation rate of the star. Recent observations at higher cadence have allowed the discovery of shorter cycles with periods between 1-3 yr. Some of these shorter cycles coexist with longer cycle periods, suggesting that two underlying dynamos can operate simultaneously. We combine these new observations with previous data, and we show that the longer and shorter cycle periods agree remarkably well with those expected from an earlier analysis based on the mean activity level and the rotation period. The relative turbulent length scales associated with the two branches of cyclic behavior suggest that a near-surface dynamo may be the dominant mechanism that drives cycles in more active stars, whereas a dynamo operating in deeper layers may dominate in less active stars. However, several examples of equally prominent long and short cycles have been found at all levels of activity of stars younger than 2.3 Gyr. Deviations from the expected cycle periods show no dependence on the depth of the convection zone or on the metallicity. For some stars that exhibit longer cycles, we compute the periods of shorter cycles that might be detected with future high-cadence observations.
  • Sunspots are of basic interest in the study of the Sun. Their relevance ranges from them being an activity indicator of magnetic fields to being the place where coronal mass ejections and flares erupt. They are therefore also an important ingredient of space weather. Their formation, however, is still an unresolved problem in solar physics. Observations utilize just 2D surface information near the spot, but it is debatable how to infer deep structures and properties from local helioseismology. For a long time, it was believed that flux tubes rising from the bottom of the convection zone are the origin of the bipolar sunspot structure seen on the solar surface. However, this theory has been challenged, in particular recently by new surface observation, helioseismic inversions, and numerical models of convective dynamos. In this article we discuss another theoretical approach to the formation of sunspots: the negative effective magnetic pressure instability. This is a large-scale instability, in which the total (kinetic plus magnetic) turbulent pressure can be suppressed in the presence of a weak large-scale magnetic field, leading to a converging downflow, which eventually concentrates the magnetic field within it. Numerical simulations of forced stratified turbulence have been able to produce strong super-equipartition flux concentrations, similar to sunspots at the solar surface. In this framework, sunspots would only form close to the surface due to the instability constraints on stratification and rotation. Additionally, we present some ideas from local helioseismology, where we plan to use the Hankel analysis to study the pre-emergence phase of a sunspot and to constrain its deep structure and formation mechanism.
  • Recent direct numerical simulations (DNS) of large-scale turbulent dynamos in strongly stratified layers have resulted in surprisingly sharp bipolar structures at the surface. Here we present new DNS of helically and non-helically forced turbulence with and without rotation and compare with corresponding mean-field simulations (MFS) to show that these structures are a generic outcome of a broader class of dynamos in density-stratified layers. The MFS agree qualitatively with the DNS, but the period of oscillations tends to be longer in the DNS. In both DNS and MFS, the sharp structures are produced by converging flows at the surface and might be driven in nonlinear stage of evolution by the Lorentz force associated with the large-scale dynamo-driven magnetic field if the dynamo number is at least 2.5 times supercritical.
  • Analytic solutions of the mean-field induction equation predict a nonoscillatory dynamo for homogeneous helical turbulence or constant alpha effect in unbounded or periodic domains. Oscillatory dynamos are generally thought impossible for constant alpha. We present an analytic solution for a one-dimensional bounded domain resulting in oscillatory solutions for constant alpha, but different (Dirichlet and von Neumann or perfect conductor and vacuum) boundary conditions on the two boundaries. We solve a second order complex equation and superimpose two independent solutions to obey both boundary conditions. The solution has time-independent energy density. On one end where the function value vanishes, the second derivative is finite, which would not be correctly reproduced with sine-like expansion functions where a node coincides with an inflection point. The field always migrates away from the perfect conductor boundary toward the vacuum boundary, independently of the sign of alpha. The obtained solution may serve as a benchmark for numerical dynamo experiments and as a pedagogical illustration that oscillatory migratory dynamos are possible with constant alpha.
  • We develop a two-scale formalism to determine global magnetic helicity spectra in systems where the local magnetic helicity has opposite signs on both sides of the equator, giving rise to cancelation with conventional methods. We verify this approach using first a synthetic one-dimensional magnetic field and then two-dimensional slices from a three-dimensional alpha effect-type dynamo-generated magnetic field with forced turbulence of opposite helicity above and below the midplane of the domain. We then apply this formalism to global solar synoptic vector magnetograms. To improve the statistics, data from three consecutive Carrington rotations (2161--2163) are combined into a single map. We find that the spectral magnetic helicity representative of the northern hemisphere is negative at all wavenumbers and peaks at ~ 0.06 Mm^{-1} (scales around 100 Mm). There is no evidence of bihelical magnetic fields that are found in three-dimensional turbulence simulations of helicity-driven alpha effect-type dynamos.
  • We perform numerical simulations of decaying hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. We classify our time-dependent solutions by their evolutionary tracks in parametric plots between instantaneous scaling exponents. We find distinct classes of solutions evolving along specific trajectories toward points on a line of self-similar solutions. These trajectories are determined by the underlying physics governing individual cases, while the infrared slope of the initial conditions plays only a limited role. In the helical case, even for a scale-invariant initial spectrum (inversely proportional to wavenumber k), the solution evolves along the same trajectory as for a Batchelor spectrum (proportional to k^4.
  • In the presence of strong density stratification, hydromagnetic turbulence attains qualitatively new properties: the formation of magnetic flux concentrations. We review here the theoretical foundations of this mechanism in terms of what is now called the negative effective magnetic pressure instability. We also present direct numerical simulations of forced turbulence in strongly stratified layers and discuss the qualitative and quantitative similarities with corresponding mean-field simulations. Finally, the relevance to sunspot formation is discussed.
  • The effects of a non-gradient flux term originating from the motion of convective elements with entropy perturbations of either sign are investigated and incorporated into a modified version of stellar mixing length theory (MLT). Such a term, first studied by Deardorff in the meteorological context, might represent the effects of cold intense downdrafts caused by the rapid cooling in the granulation layer at the top of the convection zone of late-type stars. Such intense downdrafts were first seen in the strongly stratified simulations of Stein & Nordlund in the late 1980s. These downdrafts transport heat nonlocally, a phenomenon referred to as entropy rain. Moreover, the Deardorff term can cause upward enthalpy transport even in a weakly Schwarzschild-stably stratified layer. In that case, no giant cell convection would be excited. This is interest in view of recent observations, which could be explained if the dominant flow structures were of small scale even at larger depths. To study this possibility, three distinct flow structures are examined: one in which convective structures have similar size and mutual separation at all depths, one in which the separation increases with depth, but their size is still unchanged, and one in which both size and separation increase with depth, which is the standard flow structure. It is concluded that the third possibility with fewer and thicker downdrafts in deeper layers remains most plausible, but it may be unable to explain the suspected absence of large-scale flows with speeds and scales expected from MLT.
  • We study the evolution of primordial magnetic fields in an expanding cosmic plasma. For this purpose we present a comprehensive theoretical model to consider the evolution of MHD turbulence that can be used over a wide range of physical conditions, including cosmological and astrophysical applications. We model different types of decaying cosmic MHD turbulence in the expanding universe and characterize the large-scale magnetic fields in such a medium. Direct numerical simulations of freely decaying MHD turbulence are performed for different magnetogenesis scenarios: magnetic fields generated during cosmic inflation as well as electroweak and QCD phase transitions in the early universe. Magnetic fields and fluid motions are strongly coupled due to the high Reynolds number in the early universe. Hence, we abandon the simple adiabatic dilution model to estimate magnetic field amplitudes in the expanding universe and include turbulent mixing effects on the large-scale magnetic field evolution. Numerical simulations have been carried out for non-helical and helical magnetic field configurations. The numerical results show the possibility of inverse transfer of energy in magnetically dominated non-helical MHD turbulence. On the other hand, decay properties of helical turbulence depend on whether the turbulent magnetic field is in a weakly or a fully helical state. Our results show that primordial magnetic fields can be considered as a seed for the observed large-scale magnetic fields in galaxies and clusters. Bounds on the magnetic field strength are obtained and are consistent with the upper and lower limits set by observations of extragalactic magnetic fields.
  • We report a systematic strengthening of the local solar surface or fundamental $f$-mode $1$-$2$ days prior to the emergence of an active region (AR) in the same (corotating) location. Except for a possibly related increase in the kurtosis of the magnetic field, no indication can be seen in the magnetograms at that time. Our study is motivated by earlier numerical findings of Singh et al. (2014) which showed that, in the presence of a nonuniform magnetic field that is concentrated a few scale heights below the surface, the $f$-mode fans out in the diagnostic $k\omega$ diagram at high wavenumbers. Here we explore this possibility using data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and show for six isolated ARs, 11130, 11158, 11242, 11105, 11072, and 11768, that at large latitudinal wavenumbers (corresponding to horizontal scales of around 3000 km), the $f$-mode displays strengthening about two days prior to AR formation and thus provides a new precursor for AR formation. Furthermore, we study two ARs, 12051 and 11678, apart from a magnetically quiet patch lying next to AR~12529, to demonstrate the challenges in extracting such a precursor signal when a newly forming AR emerges in a patch that lies in close proximity of one or several already existing ARs which are expected to pollute neighboring patches. We then discuss plausible procedures for extracting precursor signals from regions with crowded environments. The idea that the $f$-mode is perturbed days before any visible magnetic activity occurs at the surface can be important in constraining dynamo models aimed at understanding the global magnetic activity of the Sun.
  • We use high resolution direct numerical simulations (DNS) to show that helical turbulence can generate significant large-scale fields even in the presence of strong small-scale dynamo action. During the kinematic stage, the unified large/small-scale dynamo grows fields with a shape-invariant eigenfunction, with most power peaked at small scales or large $k$, as in \citet{SB14}. Nevertheless, the large-scale field can be clearly detected as an excess power at small $k$ in the negatively polarized component of the energy spectrum for a forcing with positively polarized waves. Its strength $bar{B}$, relative to the total rms field $B_{rms}$, decreases with increasing magnetic Reynolds number, $R_m$. However, as the Lorentz force becomes important, the field generated by the unified dynamo orders itself by saturating on successively larger scales. The magnetic integral scale for the positively polarized waves, characterizing the small-scale field, increases significantly from the kinematic stage to saturation. This implies that the small-scale field becomes as coherent as possible for a given forcing scale, which averts the $R_m$-dependent quenching of $\bar{B}/B_rms$. These results are obtained for $1024^3$ DNS with magnetic Prandtl numbers of $P_m=0.1$ and $10$. For $P_m=0.1$, $\bar{B}/B_{rms}$ grows from about $0.04$ to about $0.4$ at saturation, aided in the final stages by helicity dissipation. For $P_m=10$, $\bar{B}/B_{rms}$ grows from much less than 0.01 to values of the order the $0.2$. Our results confirm that there is a unified large/small-scale dynamo in helical turbulence.