• We consider the problem of distributed estimation of a Gaussian vector with linear observation model. Each sensor makes a scalar noisy observation of the unknown vector, quantizes its observation, maps it to a digitally modulated symbol, and transmits the symbol over orthogonal power-constrained fading channels to a fusion center (FC). The FC is tasked with fusing the received signals from sensors and estimating the unknown vector. We derive the Bayesian Fisher Information Matrix (FIM) for three types of receivers: (i) coherent receiver (ii) noncoherent receiver with known channel envelopes (iii) noncoherent receiver with known channel statistics only. We also derive the Weiss-Weinstein bound (WWB). We formulate two constrained optimization problems, namely maximizing trace and log-determinant of Bayesian FIM under network transmit power constraint, with sensors transmit powers being the optimization variables. We show that for coherent receiver, these problems are concave. However, for noncoherent receivers, they are not necessarily concave. The solution to the trace of Bayesian FIM maximization problem can be implemented in a distributed fashion. We numerically investigate how the FIM-max power allocation across sensors depends on the sensors observation qualities and physical layer parameters as well as the network transmit power constraint. Moreover, we evaluate the system performance in terms of MSE using the solutions of FIM-max schemes, and compare it with the solution obtained from minimizing the MSE of the LMMSE estimator (MSE-min scheme), and that of uniform power allocation. These comparisons illustrate that, although the WWB is tighter than the inverse of Bayesian FIM, it is still suitable to use FIM-max schemes, since the performance loss in terms of the MSE of the LMMSE estimator is not significant.
  • A new class of formal latent-variable stochastic processes called hidden quantum models (HQM's) is defined in order to clarify the theoretical foundations of ion channel signal processing. HQM's are based on quantum stochastic processes which formalize time-dependent observation. They allow the calculation of autocovariance functions which are essential for frequency-domain signal processing. HQM's based on a particular type of observation protocol called independent activated measurements are shown to to be distributionally equivalent to hidden Markov models yet without an underlying physical Markov process. Since the formal Markov processes are non-physical, the theory of activated measurement allows merging energy-based Eyring rate theories of ion channel behavior with the more common phenomenological Markov kinetic schemes to form energy-modulated quantum channels. Using the simplest quantum channel model consistent with neuronal membrane voltage-clamp experiments, activation eigenenergies are calculated for the Hodgkin-Huxley K+ and Na+ ion channels. It is also shown that maximizing entropy under constrained activation energy yields noise spectral densities approximating $S(f) \sim 1/f^\alpha$, thus offering a biophysical explanation for the ubiquitous $1/f$-type in neurological signals.
  • In this paper we provide a set of stability conditions for linear time-varying networked control systems with arbitrary topologies using a piecewise quadratic switching stabilization approach with multiple quadratic Lyapunov functions. We use this set of stability conditions to provide a novel iterative low-complexity algorithm that must be updated and optimized in discrete time for the design of a sparse observer-controller network, for a given plant network with an arbitrary topology. We employ distributed observers by utilizing the output of other subsystems to improve the stability of each observer. To avoid unbounded growth of controller and observer gains, we impose bounds on the norms of the gains.
  • A repetitive visual stimulus induces a brain response known as the Steady State Visual Evoked Potential (SSVEP) whose frequency matches that of the stimulus. Reliable SSVEP-based Brain-Computer-Interfacing (BCI) is premised in part on the ability to efficiently detect and classify the true underlying frequencies in real time. We pose the problem of detecting different frequencies corresponding to different stimuli as a composite multi-hypothesis test, where measurements from multiple electrodes are assumed to admit a sparse representation in a Ramanujan Periodicity Transform (RPT) dictionary. We develop an RPT detector based on a generalized likelihood ratio test of the underlying periodicity that accounts for the spatial correlation between the electrodes. Unlike the existing supervised methods which are highly data-dependent, the RPT detector only uses data to estimate the per-subject spatial correlation. The RPT detector is shown to yield promising results comparable to state-of-the-art methods such as standard CCA and IT CCA based on experiments with real data. Its ability to yield high accuracy with short epochs holds potential to advance real-time BCI technology.
  • We consider distributed estimation of a Gaussian source in a heterogenous bandwidth constrained sensor network, where the source is corrupted by independent multiplicative and additive observation noises, with incomplete statistical knowledge of the multiplicative noise. For multi-bit quantizers, we derive the closed-form mean-square-error (MSE) expression for the linear minimum MSE (LMMSE) estimator at the FC. For both error-free and erroneous communication channels, we propose several rate allocation methods named as longest root to leaf path, greedy and integer relaxation to (i) minimize the MSE given a network bandwidth constraint, and (ii) minimize the required network bandwidth given a target MSE. We also derive the Bayesian Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) and compare the MSE performance of our proposed methods against the CRLB. Our results corroborate that, for low power multiplicative observation noises and adequate network bandwidth, the gaps between the MSE of our proposed methods and the CRLB are negligible, while the performance of other methods like individual rate allocation and uniform is not satisfactory.
  • We consider a wireless sensor network (WSN), consisting of several sensors and a fusion center (FC), which is tasked with solving an M-ary hypothesis testing problem. Sensors make M-ary decisions and transmit their digitally modulated decisions over orthogonal channels, which are subject to Rayleigh fading and noise, to the FC. Adopting Bayesian optimality criterion, we consider training and non-training based distributed detection systems and investigate the effect of imperfect channel state information (CSI) on the optimal maximum a posteriori probability (MAP) fusion rules and optimal power allocation between sensors, when the sum of training and data symbol transmit powers is fixed. We consider J-divergence criteria to do power allocation between sensors. The theoretical results show that J-divergence for coherent reception will be maximized if total training power be half of total power, however for non coherent reception, optimal training power which maximize J-divergence is zero. The simulated results also show that probability of error will be minimized if training power be half of total power for coherent reception and zero for non coherent reception.
  • $Objective$: A characteristic of neurological signal processing is high levels of noise from sub-cellular ion channels up to whole-brain processes. In this paper, we propose a new model of electroencephalogram (EEG) background periodograms, based on a family of functions which we call generalized van der Ziel--McWhorter (GVZM) power spectral densities (PSDs). To the best of our knowledge, the GVZM PSD function is the only EEG noise model which has relatively few parameters, matches recorded EEG PSD's with high accuracy from 0 Hz to over 30 Hz, and has approximately $1/f^\theta$ behavior in the mid-frequencies without infinities. $Methods$: We validate this model using three approaches. First, we show how GVZM PSDs can arise in population of ion channels in maximum entropy equilibrium. Second, we present a class of mixed autoregressive models, which simulate brain background noise and whose periodograms are asymptotic to the GVZM PSD. Third, we present two real-time estimation algorithms for steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) frequencies, and analyze their performance statistically. $Results$: In pairwise comparisons, the GVZM-based algorithms showed statistically significant accuracy improvement over two well-known and widely-used SSVEP estimators. $Conclusion$: The GVZM noise model can be a useful and reliable technique for EEG signal processing. $Significance$: Understanding EEG noise is essential for EEG-based neurology and applications such as real-time brain-computer interfaces (BCIs), which must make accurate control decisions from very short data epochs. The GVZM approach represents a successful new paradigm for understanding and managing this neurological noise.
  • Here, we study the ultimately bounded stability of network of mismatched systems using Lyapunov direct method. We derive an upper bound on the norm of the error of network states from its average states, which it achieves in finite time. Then, we devise a decentralized compensator to asymptotically pin the network of mismatched systems to a desired trajectory. Next, we design distributed estimators to compensate for the mismatched parameters performances of adaptive decentralized and distributed compensations are analyzed. Our analytical results are verified by several simulations in a network of globally connected Lorenz oscillators.
  • This paper considers the problem of binary distributed detection of a known signal in correlated Gaussian sensing noise in a wireless sensor network, where the sensors are restricted to use likelihood ratio test (LRT), and communicate with the fusion center (FC) over bandwidth-constrained channels that are subject to fading and noise. To mitigate the deteriorating effect of fading encountered in the conventional parallel fusion architecture, in which the sensors directly communicate with the FC, we propose new fusion architectures that enhance the detection performance, via harvesting cooperative gain (so-called decision diversity gain). In particular, we propose: (i) cooperative fusion architecture with Alamouti's space-time coding (STC) scheme at sensors, (ii) cooperative fusion architecture with signal fusion at sensors, and (iii) parallel fusion architecture with local threshold changing at sensors. For these schemes, we derive the LRT and majority fusion rules at the FC, and provide upper bounds on the average error probabilities for homogeneous sensors, subject to uncorrelated Gaussian sensing noise, in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of communication and sensing channels. Our simulation results indicate that, when the FC employs the LRT rule, unless for low communication SNR and moderate/high sensing SNR, performance improvement is feasible with the new fusion architectures. When the FC utilizes the majority rule, such improvement is possible, unless for high sensing SNR.
  • Here, we study the ultimately bounded stability of network of mismatched systems using Lyapunov direct method. The upper bound on the error of oscillators from the center of the neighborhood is derived. Then the performance of an adaptive compensation via decentralized control is analyzed. Finally, the analytical results for a network of globally connected Lorenz oscillators are verified.
  • We consider distributed estimation of a Gaussian vector with a linear observation model in an inhomogeneous wireless sensor network, where a fusion center (FC) reconstructs the unknown vector, using a linear estimator. Sensors employ uniform multi-bit quantizers and binary PSK modulation, and communicate with the FC over orthogonal power- and bandwidth-constrained wireless channels. We study transmit power and quantization rate (measured in bits per sensor) allocation schemes that minimize mean-square error (MSE). In particular, we derive two closed-form upper bounds on the MSE, in terms of the optimization parameters and propose coupled and decoupled resource allocation schemes that minimize these bounds. We show that the bounds are good approximations of the simulated MSE and the performance of the proposed schemes approaches the clairvoyant centralized estimation when total transmit power or bandwidth is very large. We study how the power and rate allocation are dependent on sensors observation qualities and channel gains, as well as total transmit power and bandwidth constraints. Our simulations corroborate our analytical results and illustrate the superior performance of the proposed algorithms.