• We present the longest-term timing study so far of three Rotating Radio Transients (RRATs) - J1819-1458, J1840-1419 and J1913+1330 - performed using the Lovell, Parkes and Green Bank telescopes over the past decade. We study long-term and short- term variations of the pulse emission rate from these RRATs and report a marginal indication of a long-term increase in pulse detection rate over time for PSR J1819-1458 and J1913+1330. For PSR J1913+1330, we also observe a two orders of magnitude variation in the observed pulse detection rates across individual epochs, which may constrain the models explaining the origin of RRAT pulses. PSR J1913+1330 is also observed to exhibit a weak persistent emission mode. We investigate the post-glitch timing properties of J1819-1458 (the only RRAT for which glitches are observed) and discuss the implications for possible glitch models. Its post-glitch over-recovery of the frequency derivative is magnetar-like and similar behaviour is only observed for two other pulsars, both of which have relatively high magnetic field strengths. Following the over-recovery we also observe that some fraction of the pre-glitch frequency derivative is gradually recovered.
  • We report on the analysis of 13 gamma-ray pulsars discovered in the Einstein@Home blind search survey using Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) Pass 8 data. The 13 new gamma-ray pulsars were discovered by searching 118 unassociated LAT sources from the third LAT source catalog (3FGL), selected using the Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) machine learning algorithm on the basis of their gamma-ray emission properties being suggestive of pulsar magnetospheric emission. The new gamma-ray pulsars have pulse profiles and spectral properties similar to those of previously-detected young gamma-ray pulsars. Follow-up radio observations have revealed faint radio pulsations from two of the newly-discovered pulsars, and enabled us to derive upper limits on the radio emission from the others, demonstrating that they are likely radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars. We also present results from modeling the gamma-ray pulse profiles and radio profiles, if available, using different geometric emission models of pulsars. The high discovery rate of this survey, despite the increasing difficulty of blind pulsar searches in gamma rays, suggests that new systematic surveys such as presented in this article should be continued when new LAT source catalogs become available.
  • Dense, continuous pulsar timing observations over a 24-hr period provide a method for probing intermediate gravitational wave (GW) frequencies from 10 microhertz to 20 millihertz. The European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA), the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav), the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA), and the combined International Pulsar Timing Array (IPTA) all use millisecond pulsar observations to detect or constrain GWs typically at nanohertz frequencies. In the case of the IPTA's nine-telescope 24-Hour Global Campaign on millisecond pulsar J1713+0747, GW limits in the intermediate frequency regime can be produced. The negligible change in dispersion measure during the observation minimizes red noise in the timing residuals, constraining any contributions from GWs due to individual sources. At 10$^{-5}$Hz, the 95% upper limit on strain is 10$^{-11}$ for GW sources in the pulsar's direction.
  • In a search with the Parkes radio telescope of 56 unidentified Fermi-LAT gamma-ray sources, we have detected 11 millisecond pulsars (MSPs), 10 of them discoveries, of which five were reported in Kerr et al. (2012). We did not detect radio pulsations from another six pulsars now known in these sources. We describe the completed survey, which included multiple observations of many targets done to minimize the impact of interstellar scintillation, acceleration effects in binary systems, and eclipses. We consider that 23 of the 39 remaining sources may still be viable pulsar candidates. We present timing solutions and polarimetry for five of the MSPs, and gamma-ray pulsations for PSR J1903-7051 (pulsations for five others were reported in the second Fermi-LAT catalog of gamma-ray pulsars). Two of the new MSPs are isolated and five are in >1 d circular orbits with 0.2-0.3 Msun presumed white dwarf companions. PSR J0955-6150, in a 24 d orbit with a ~0.25 Msun companion but eccentricity of 0.11, belongs to a recently identified class of eccentric MSPs. PSR J1036-8317 is in an 8 hr binary with a >0.14 Msun companion that is probably a white dwarf. PSR J1946-5403 is in a 3 hr orbit with a >0.02 Msun companion with no evidence of radio eclipses.
  • The 1.69 ms spin period of PSR J1227-4853 was recently discovered in radio observations of the low-mass X-ray binary XSS J12270-4859 following the announcement of a possible transition to a rotation-powered millisecond pulsar state, inferred from decreases in optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray flux from the source. We report the detection of significant (5$\sigma$) gamma-ray pulsations after the transition, at the known spin period, using ~1 year of data from the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The gamma-ray light curve of PSR J1227-4853 can be fit by one broad peak, which occurs at nearly the same phase as the main peak in the 1.4 GHz radio profile. The partial alignment of light-curve peaks in different wavebands suggests that at least some of the radio emission may originate at high altitude in the pulsar magnetosphere, in extended regions co-located with the gamma-ray emission site. We folded the LAT data at the orbital period, both pre- and post-transition, but find no evidence for significant modulation of the gamma-ray flux. Analysis of the gamma-ray flux over the mission suggests an approximate transition time of 2012 November 30. Continued study of the pulsed emission and monitoring of PSR J1227-4853, and other known redback systems, for subsequent flux changes will increase our knowledge of the pulsar emission mechanism and transitioning systems.
  • The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will make ground breaking discoveries in pulsar science. In this chapter we outline the SKA surveys for new pulsars, as well as how we will perform the necessary follow-up timing observations. The SKA's wide field-of-view, high sensitivity, multi-beaming and sub-arraying capabilities, coupled with advanced pulsar search backends, will result in the discovery of a large population of pulsars. These will enable the SKA's pulsar science goals (tests of General Relativity with pulsar binary systems, investigating black hole theorems with pulsar-black hole binaries, and direct detection of gravitational waves in a pulsar timing array). Using SKA1-MID and SKA1-LOW we will survey the Milky Way to unprecedented depth, increasing the number of known pulsars by more than an order of magnitude. SKA2 will potentially find all the Galactic radio-emitting pulsars in the SKA sky which are beamed in our direction. This will give a clear picture of the birth properties of pulsars and of the gravitational potential, magnetic field structure and interstellar matter content of the Galaxy. Targeted searches will enable detection of exotic systems, such as the ~1000 pulsars we infer to be closely orbiting Sgr A*, the supermassive black hole in the Galactic Centre. In addition, the SKA's sensitivity will be sufficient to detect pulsars in local group galaxies. To derive the spin characteristics of the discoveries we will perform live searches, and use sub-arraying and dynamic scheduling to time pulsars as soon as they are discovered, while simultaneously continuing survey observations. The large projected number of discoveries suggests that we will uncover currently unknown rare systems that can be exploited to push the boundaries of our understanding of astrophysics and provide tools for testing physics, as has been done by the pulsar community in the past.
  • The radio millisecond pulsar J1713+0747 is regarded as one of the highest-precision clocks in the sky, and is regularly timed for the purpose of detecting gravitational waves. The International Pulsar Timing Array collaboration undertook a 24-hour global observation of PSR J1713+0747 in an effort to better quantify sources of timing noise in this pulsar, particularly on intermediate (1 - 24 hr) timescales. We observed the pulsar continuously over 24 hr with the Arecibo, Effelsberg, GMRT, Green Bank, LOFAR, Lovell, Nancay, Parkes, and WSRT radio telescopes. The combined pulse times-of-arrival presented here provide an estimate of what sources of timing noise, excluding DM variations, would be present as compared to an idealized root-N improvement in timing precision, where N is the number of pulses analyzed. In the case of this particular pulsar, we find that intrinsic pulse phase jitter dominates arrival time precision when the S/N of single pulses exceeds unity, as measured using the eight telescopes that observed at L-band/1.4 GHz. We present first results of specific phenomena probed on the unusually long timescale (for a single continuous observing session) of tens of hours, in particular interstellar scintillation, and discuss the degree to which scintillation and profile evolution affect precision timing. This paper presents the data set as a basis for future, deeper studies.
  • In this paper we present results from flux density measurements for 21 pulsars over a wide frequency range, using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) and the Effelsberg telescope. Our sample was a set of mostly newly discovered pulsars from the selection of candidates for gigahertz-peaked spectra (GPS) pulsars. Using the results of our observations along with previously published data, we identify two new GPS pulsars. One of them, PSR J1740+1000, with dispersion measure of 24 pc cm$^{-3}$, is the first GPS pulsar with such a low DM value.We also selected several strong candidates for objects with high frequency turnover in their spectra which require further investigation.We also revisit our source selection criteria for future searches for GPS pulsars.
  • Using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) we performed deep observations to search for radio pulsations in the directions of unidentified Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) gamma-ray sources. We report the discovery of an eclipsing black-widow millisecond pulsar, PSR J1544+4937, identified with the un-cataloged gamma-ray source Fermi J1544.2+4941. This 2.16 ms pulsar is in a 2.9 hours compact circular orbit with a very low-mass companion (Mc > 0.017 Msun). At 322 MHz this pulsar is found to be eclipsing for 13% of its orbit, whereas at 607 MHz the pulsar is detected throughout the low-frequency eclipse phase. Variations in the eclipse ingress phase are observed, indicating a clumpy and variable eclipsing medium. Moreover, additional short-duration absorption events are observed around the eclipse boundaries. Using the radio timing ephemeris we were able to detect gamma-ray pulsations from this pulsar, confirming it as the source powering the gamma-ray emission.
  • We report the detection of radio emission from PSR J1311-3430, the first millisecond pulsar discovered in a blind search of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) gamma-ray data. We detected radio pulsations at 2 GHz, visible for <10% of ~4.5-hrs of observations using the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Observations at 5 GHz with the GBT and at several lower frequencies with Parkes, Nancay, and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope resulted in non-detections. We also report the faint detection of a steep spectrum continuum radio source (0.1 mJy at 5 GHz) in interferometric imaging observations with the Jansky Very Large Array. These detections demonstrate that PSR J1311-3430, is not radio quiet and provides additional evidence that the radio beaming fraction of millisecond pulsars is very large. The radio detection yields a distance estimate of 1.4 kpc for the system, yielding a gamma-ray efficiency of 30%, typical of LAT-detected MSPs. We see apparent excess delay in the radio pulsar as the pulsar appears from eclipse and we speculate on possible mechanisms for the non-detections of the pulse at other orbital phases and observing frequencies.
  • We present a summary of the Fermi Pulsar Search Consortium (PSC), an international collaboration of radio astronomers and members of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) collaboration, whose goal is to organize radio follow-up observations of Fermi pulsars and pulsar candidates among the LAT gamma-ray source population. The PSC includes pulsar observers with expertise using the world's largest radio telescopes that together cover the full sky. We have performed very deep observations of all 35 pulsars discovered in blind frequency searches of the LAT data, resulting in the discovery of radio pulsations from four of them. We have also searched over 300 LAT gamma-ray sources that do not have strong associations with known gamma-ray emitting source classes and have pulsar-like spectra and variability characteristics. These searches have led to the discovery of a total of 43 new radio millisecond pulsars (MSPs) and four normal pulsars. These discoveries greatly increase the known population of MSPs in the Galactic disk, more than double the known population of so-called `black widow' pulsars, and contain many promising candidates for inclusion in pulsar timing arrays.
  • We report new results obtained from multi-frequency observations of PSR B0826-34 with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). (1) We find no evidence of weak emission during the typical long null state of this pulsar, simultaneously at 303 and 610 MHz, as well as individually at 157, 325, 610 and 1060 MHz at separate epochs. Our limit of non-detection is at ~ 1% or better of the peak of the active state profile, and corresponds to ~ 2 mJy at 610 MHz. (2) Significant correlation in the total intensity of the individual pulses between 303 and 610 MHz is reported from the simultaneous dual frequency observations, which is indicative of the broadband nature of the emission. We also report correlation between total energy in the main pulse and inter-pulse region from the high sensitivity single frequency observations at 610 and 1060 MHz. (3) Though we find the drift pattern to be very similar in the simultaneous 303 and 610 MHz data, we observe that the drift band separation (P2) evolves significantly between these two frequencies, and in a manner opposite to the average profile evolution. In addition, we confirm the dependence of P2 on pulse longitude at 303 MHz and find indications for the same at 610 MHz. We also present results for subpulse width at different frequencies, and as well as a function of pulse longitude. (4) As a natural out-come of the simultaneous dual frequency observations, we obtain an accurate DM value, equal to 52.2(6) pc/cc, for this pulsar.
  • We report the discovery of a remarkable subpulse drift pattern in the relatively less studied wide profile pulsar, B0818-41, using high sensitivity GMRT observations. We find simultaneous occurrence of three drift regions with two different drift rates: an inner region with steeper apparent drift rate flanked on each side by a region of slower apparent drift rate. Furthermore, these closely spaced drift bands always maintain a constant phase relationship. Though these drift regions have significantly different values for the measured P2, the measured P3 value is the same and equal to 18.3 P1. We interpret the unique drift pattern of this pulsar as being created by the intersection of our line of sight (LOS) with two conal rings on the polar cap of a fairly aligned rotator (inclination angle alpha ~ 11 deg), with an ``inner'' LOS geometry (impact angle beta ~ -5.4 deg). We argue that both the rings have the same values for the carousel rotation periodicity P4 and the number of sparks Nsp. We find that Nsp is 19-21 and show that it is very likely that, P4 is the same as the measured P3, making it a truly unique pulsar. We present results from simulations of the radiation pattern using the inferred parameters, that support our interpretations and reproduce the average profile as well as the observed features in the drift pattern quite well.