• This article reports on the feasibility of testing of the symmetry under reversal in time in a purely leptonic system constituted by positronium atoms using the J-PET detector. The present state of T symmetry tests is discussed with an emphasis on the scarcely explored sector of leptonic systems. Two possible strategies of searching for manifestations of T violation in non-vanishing angular correlations of final state observables in the decays of metastable triplet states of positronium available with J-PET are proposed and discussed. Results of a pilot measurement with J-PET and assessment of its performance in reconstruction of three-photon decays are shown along with an analysis of its impact on the sensitivity of the detector for the determination of T -violation sensitive observables.
  • The Jagiellonian Positron Emission Tomograph (J-PET) project carried out in the Institute of Physics of the Jagiellonian University is focused on construction and tests of the first prototype of PET scanner for medical diagnostic which allows for the simultaneous 3D imaging of the whole human body using organic scintillators. The J-PET prototype consists of 192 scintillator strips forming three cylindrical layers which are optimized for the detection of photons from the electron-positron annihilation with high time- and high angular-resolutions. In this article we present time calibration and synchronization of the whole J-PET detection system by irradiating each single detection module with a 22Na source and a small detector providing common reference time for synchronization of all the modules.
  • Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) has shown to be a powerful tool to study the nanostructures of porous materials. Positron Emissions Tomography (PET) are devices allowing imaging of metabolic processes e.g. in human bodies. A newly developed device, the J-PET (Jagiellonian PET), will allow PALS in addition to imaging, thus combining both analyses providing new methods for physics and medicine. In this contribution we present a computer program that is compatible with the J-PET software. We compare its performance with the standard program LT 9.0 by using PALS data from hexane measurements at different temperatures. Our program is based on an iterative procedure, and our fits prove that it performs as good as LT 9.0.
  • We analize the non-cyclic geometric phase for neutrinos. We find that the geometric phase and the total phase associated to the mixing phenomenon provide a tool to distinguish between Dirac and Majorana neutrinos. Our results hold for neutrinos propagating in vacuum and through the matter. Future experiments, based on interferometry, could reveal the nature of neutrinos.
  • We present a study of the application of the Jagiellonian Positron Emission Tomograph (J-PET) for the registration of gamma quanta from decays of ortho-positronium (o-Ps). The J-PET is the first positron emission tomography scanner based on organic scintillators in contrast to all current PET scanners based on inorganic crystals. Monte Carlo simulations show that the J-PET as an axially symmetric and high acceptance scanner can be used as a multi-purpose detector well suited to pursue research including e.g. tests of discrete symmetries in decays of ortho-positronium in addition to the medical imaging. The gamma quanta originating from o-Ps decay interact in the plastic scintillators predominantly via the Compton effect, making the direct measurement of their energy impossible. Nevertheless, it is shown in this paper that the J-PET scanner will enable studies of the o-Ps$\to3\gamma$ decays with angular and energy resolution equal to $\sigma(\theta) \approx 0.4^{\circ}$ and $\sigma(E) \approx 4.1$ keV, respectively. An order of magnitude shorter decay time of signals from plastic scintillators with respect to the inorganic crystals results not only in better timing properties crucial for the reduction of physical and instrumental background, but also suppresses significantly the pileups, thus enabling compensation of the lower efficiency of the plastic scintillators by performing measurements with higher positron source activities.
  • The Jagiellonian Positron Emission Tomograph (J-PET) was constructed as a prototype of the cost-effective scanner for the simultaneous metabolic imaging of the whole human body. Being optimized for the detection of photons from the electron-positron annihilation with high time- and high angular-resolution, it constitutes a multi-purpose detector providing new opportunities for studying the decays of positronium atoms. Positronium is the lightest purely leptonic object decaying into photons. As an atom bound by a central potential it is a parity eigenstate, and as an atom built out of an electron and an anti-electron it is an eigenstate of the charge conjugation operator. Therefore, the positronium is a unique laboratory to study discrete symmetries whose precision is limited in principle by the effects due to the weak interactions expected at the level of (~10$^{-14}$) and photon-photon interactions expected at the level of (~10$^{-9}$). The J-PET detector enables to perform tests of discrete symmetries in the leptonic sector via the determination of the expectation values of the discrete-symmetries-odd operators, which may be constructed from the spin of ortho-positronium atom and the momenta and polarization vectors of photons originating from its annihilation. In this article we present the potential of the J-PET detector to test the C, CP, T and CPT symmetries in the decays of positronium atoms.
  • Frustration in quantum many body systems is quantified by the degree of incompatibility between the local and global orders associated, respectively, to the ground states of the local interaction terms and the global ground state of the total many-body Hamiltonian. This universal measure is bounded from below by the ground-state bipartite block entanglement. For many-body Hamiltonians that are sums of two-body interaction terms, a further inequality relates quantum frustration to the pairwise entanglement between the constituents of the local interaction terms. This additional bound is a consequence of the limits imposed by monogamy on entanglement shareability. We investigate the behavior of local pair frustration in quantum spin models with competing interactions on different length scales and show that valence bond solids associated to exact ground-state dimerization correspond to a transition from generic frustration, i.e. geometric, common to classical and quantum systems alike, to genuine quantum frustration, i.e. solely due to the non-commutativity of the different local interaction terms. We discuss how such frustration transitions separating genuinely quantum orders from classical-like ones are detected by observable quantities such as the static structure factor and the interferometric visibility.
  • Quantum entanglement shared between more than two particles is essential to foundational questions in quantum mechanics, and upcoming quantum information technologies. So far, up to 14 two-dimensional qubits have been entangled, and an open question remains if one can also demonstrate entanglement of higher-dimensional discrete properties of more than two particles. A promising route is the use of the photon orbital angular momentum (OAM), which enables implementation of novel quantum information protocols, and the study of fundamentally new quantum states. To date, only two of such multidimensional particles have been entangled albeit with ever increasing dimensionality. Here we use pulsed spontaneous parametric downconversion (SPDC) to produce photon quadruplets that are entangled in their OAM, or transverse-mode degrees of freedom; and witness genuine multipartite Dicke-type entanglement. Apart from addressing foundational questions, this could find applications in quantum metrology, imaging, and secret sharing.
  • In the last decades huge theoretical effort was devoted to the development of consistent theoretical models, aiming to solve the so-called "measurement problem", to which John Bell dedicated part of his thoughts. Among these, the Dynamical Reduction Models possess the unique characteristic to be experimentally testable, thus enabling to set experimental upper bounds on the reduction rate parameter $\lambda$ characterizing these models. Analysing the X-ray spectrum emitted by an isolated slab of Germanium, we set the most stringent limit on the parameter $\lambda$ up to date.
  • Collapse models provide a theoretical framework for understanding how classical world emerges from quantum mechanics. Their dynamics preserves (practically) quantum linearity for microscopic systems, while it becomes strongly nonlinear when moving towards macroscopic scale. The conventional approach to test collapse models is to create spatial superpositions of mesoscopic systems and then examine the loss of interference, while environmental noises are engineered carefully. Here we investigate a different approach: We study systems that naturally oscillate --creating quantum superpositions-- and thus represent a natural case-study for testing quantum linearity: neutrinos, neutral mesons, and chiral molecules. We will show how spontaneous collapses affect their oscillatory behavior, and will compare them with environmental decoherence effects. We will show that, contrary to what previously predicted, collapse models cannot be tested with neutrinos. The effect is stronger for neutral mesons, but still beyond experimental reach. Instead, chiral molecules can offer promising candidates for testing collapse models.
  • Collapse models predict the spontaneous collapse of the wave function, in order to avoid the emergence of macroscopic superpositions. In their mass-dependent formulation they claim that the collapse of any system's wave function depends on its mass. Neutral K, D, B mesons are oscillating systems that are given by Nature as superposition of different mass eigenstates. Thus they are unique and interesting systems to look at, for analyzing the experimental implications of such models, so far in agreement with all known experiments. In this paper we derive - for the single mesons and bipartite entangled mesons - the effect of the mass-proportional CSL collapse model on the dynamics on neutral mesons, including the relativistic effects. We compare the theoretical prediction with experimental data from different accelerator facilities.
  • We briefly illustrate a few tests of quantum mechanics which can be performed with entangled neutral kaon pairs at a Phi-factory. This includes a quantitative formulation of Bohr's complementarity principle, the quantum eraser phenomenon and various forms of Bell inequalities.
  • Quantum marking and quantum erasure are discussed for the neutral kaon system. Contrary to other two-level systems, strangeness and lifetime of a neutral kaon state can be alternatively measured via an "active" or a "passive" procedure. This offers new quantum erasure possibilities. In particular, the operation of a quantum eraser in the "delayed choice" mode is clearly illustrated.
  • First a generalized Bell-inequality for different times and for different quasi-spin states is developed. We focus on special quasi-spin eigenstates and times. The inequality based on a local realistic theory is violated by the CP-violating parameter, if the quantum theory is used to recalculate the probabilities. Next the quantum mechanical probabilities are modified by the decoherence approach which enables the initial state to factorize spontaneously. In this way we get a lower limit for the decoherence parameter \zeta, which measures the degree of decoherence. This result is compared with the experimental value of the decoherence parameter \zeta deduced from the data of the CPLEAR-experiment.