• We report a direct observation of temperature-induced topological phase transition between trivial and topological insulator in HgTe quantum well. By using a gated Hall bar device, we measure and represent Landau levels in fan charts at different temperatures and we follow the temperature evolution of a peculiar pair of "zero-mode" Landau levels, which split from the edge of electron-like and hole-like subbands. Their crossing at critical magnetic field $B_c$ is a characteristic of inverted band structure in the quantum well. By measuring the temperature dependence of $B_c$, we directly extract the critical temperature $T_c$, at which the bulk band-gap vanishes and the topological phase transition occurs. Above this critical temperature, the opening of a trivial gap is clearly observed.
  • We have investigated the disorder of epitaxial graphene close to the charge neutrality point (CNP) by various methods: i) at room temperature, by analyzing the dependence of the resistivity on the Hall coefficient ; ii) by fitting the temperature dependence of the Hall coefficient down to liquid helium temperature; iii) by fitting the magnetoresistances at low temperature. All methods converge to give a disorder amplitude of $(20 \pm 10)$ meV. Because of this relatively low disorder, close to the CNP, at low temperature, the sample resistivity does not exhibit the standard value $\simeq h/4e^2$ but diverges. Moreover, the magnetoresistance curves have a unique ambipolar behavior, which has been systematically observed for all studied samples. This is a signature of both asymmetry in the density of states and in-plane charge transfer. The microscopic origin of this behavior cannot be unambiguously determined. However, we propose a model in which the SiC substrate steps qualitatively explain the ambipolar behavior.
  • We report on the stability of the quantum Hall plateau in wide Hall bars made from a chemically gated graphene film grown on SiC. The $\nu=2$ quantized plateau appears from fields $B \simeq 5$ T and persists up to $B \simeq 80$ T. At high current density, in the breakdown regime, the longitudinal resistance oscillates with a $1/B$ periodicity and an anomalous phase, which we relate to the presence of additional electron reservoirs. The high field experimental data suggest that these reservoirs induce a continuous increase of the carrier density up to the highest available magnetic field, thus enlarging the quantum plateaus. These in-plane inhomogeneities, in the form of high carrier density graphene pockets, modulate the quantum Hall effect breakdown and decrease the breakdown current.
  • Superconducting hybrid junctions are revealing a variety of novel effects. Some of them are due to the special layout of these devices, which often use a coplanar configuration with relatively large barrier channels and the possibility of hosting Pearl vortices. A Josephson junction with a quasi ideal two-dimensional barrier has been realized by growing graphene on SiC with Al electrodes. Chemical Vapor Deposition offers centimeter size monolayer areas where it is possible to realize a comparative analysis of different devices with nominally the same barrier. In samples with a graphene gap below 400 nm, we have found evidence of Josephson coherence in presence of an incipient Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. When the magnetic field is cycled, a remarkable hysteretic collapse and revival of the Josephson supercurrent occurs. Similar hysteresis are found in granular systems and are usually justified within the Bean Critical State model (CSM). We show that the CSM, with appropriate account for the low dimensional geometry, can partly explain the odd features measured in these junctions.
  • We show that the spin-lattice relaxation in n-type insulating GaAs is dramatically accelerated at low magnetic fields. The origin of this effect, that cannot be explained in terms of well-known diffusion-limited hyperfine relaxation, is found in the quadrupole relaxation, induced by fluctuating donor charges. Therefore, quadrupole relaxation, that governs low field nuclear spin relaxation in semiconductor quantum dots, but was so far supposed to be harmless to bulk nuclei spins in the absence of optical pumping can be studied and harnessed in much simpler model environment of n-GaAs bulk crystal.
  • Graphene on silicon carbide (SiC) has proved to be highly successful in Hall conductance quantization for its homogeneity at the centimetre scale. Robust Josephson coupling has been measured in co-planar diffusive Al/monololayer graphene/Al junctions. Graphene on SiC substrates is a concrete candidate to provide scalability of hybrid Josephson graphene/superconductor devices, giving also promise of ballistic propagation.
  • We report on the exciton propagation in polar (Al,Ga)N/GaN quantum wells over several micrometers and up to room temperature. The key ingredient to achieve this result is the crystalline quality of GaN quantum wells (QWs) grown on GaN template substrate. By comparing microphotoluminescence images of two identical QWs grown on sapphire and on GaN, we reveal the twofold role played by GaN substrate in the transport of excitons. First, the lower threading dislocation densities in such structures yield higher exciton radiative efficiency, thus limiting nonradiative losses of propagating excitons. Second, the absence of the dielectric mismatch between the substrate and the epilayer strongly limits the photon guiding effect in the plane of the structure,making exciton transport easier to distinguish from photon propagation. Our results pave the way towards room-temperature gate-controlled exciton transport in wide-bandgap polar heterostructures.
  • The quantum Hall effect (QHE) theoretically provides a universal standard of electrical resistance in terms of the Planck constant $h$ and the electron charge $e$. In graphene, the spacing between the lowest discrete energy levels occupied by the charge carriers under magnetic field is exceptionally large. This is promising for a quantum Hall resistance standard more practical in graphene than in the GaAs/AlGaAs devices currently used in national metrology institutes. Here, we demonstrate that large QHE devices, made of high quality graphene grown by propane/hydrogen chemical vapour deposition on SiC substrates, can surpass state-of-the-art GaAs/AlGaAs devices by considerable margins in their required operational conditions. In particular, in the device presented here, the Hall resistance is accurately quantized within $1\times 10^{-9}$ over a 10-T wide range of magnetic field with a remarkable lower bound at 3.5 T, temperatures as high as 10 K, or measurement currents as high as 0.5 mA. These significantly enlarged and relaxed operational conditions, with a very convenient compromise of 5 T, 5.1 K and 50 $\mu$A, set the superiority of graphene for this application and for the new generation of versatile and user-friendly quantum standards, compatible with a broader industrial use. We also measured an agreement of the quantized Hall resistance in graphene and GaAs/AlGaAs with an ultimate relative uncertainty of $8.2\times 10^{-11}$. This supports the universality of the QHE and its theoretical relation to $h$ and $e$, essential for the application in metrology, particularly in view of the forthcoming Syst\`eme International d'unit\'es (SI) based on fundamental constants of physics, including the redefinition of the kilogram in terms of $h$.
  • Replacing GaAs by graphene to realize more practical quantum Hall resistance standards (QHRS), accurate to within $10^{-9}$ in relative value, but operating at lower magnetic fields than 10 T, is an ongoing goal in metrology. To date, the required accuracy has been reported, only few times, in graphene grown on SiC by sublimation of Si, under higher magnetic fields. Here, we report on a device made of graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition on SiC which demonstrates such accuracies of the Hall resistance from 10 T up to 19 T at 1.4 K. This is explained by a quantum Hall effect with low dissipation, resulting from strongly localized bulk states at the magnetic length scale, over a wide magnetic field range. Our results show that graphene-based QHRS can replace their GaAs counterparts by operating in as-convenient cryomagnetic conditions, but over an extended magnetic field range. They rely on a promising hybrid and scalable growth method and a fabrication process achieving low-electron density devices.
  • We investigate the transport of dipolar indirect excitons along the growth plane of polar (Al,Ga)N/GaN quantum well structures by means of spatially- and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. The transport in these strongly disordered quantum wells is activated by dipole-dipole repulsion. The latter induces an emission blue shift that increases linearly with exciton density, whereas the radiative recombination rate increases exponentially. Under continuous, localized excitation, we measure a continuous red shift of the emission, as excitons propagate away from the excitation spot. This shift corresponds to a steady-state gradient of exciton density, measured over several tens of micrometers. Time-resolved micro-photoluminescence experiments provide information on the dynamics of recombination and transport of dipolar excitons. We account for the ensemble of experimental results by solving the nonlinear drift-diffusion equation. Quantitative analysis suggests that in such structures, exciton propagation on the scale of 10 to 20 microns is mainly driven by diffusion, rather than by drift, due to the strong disorder and the presence of nonradiative defects. Secondary exciton creation, most probably by the intense higher-energy luminescence, guided along the sample plane, is shown to contribute to the exciton emission pattern on the scale up to 100 microns. The exciton propagation length is strongly temperature dependent, the emission being quenched beyond a critical distance governed by nonradiative recombination.
  • We present the magnetoresistance (MR) of highly doped monolayer graphene layers grown by chemical vapor deposition on 6H-SiC. The magnetotransport studies are performed on a large temperature range, from $T$ = 1.7 K up to room temperature. The MR exhibits a maximum in the temperature range $120-240$ K. The maximum is observed at intermediate magnetic fields ($B=2-6$ T), in between the weak localization and the Shubnikov-de Haas regimes. It results from the competition of two mechanisms. First, the low field magnetoresistance increases continuously with $T$ and has a purely classical origin. This positive MR is induced by thermal averaging and finds its physical origin in the energy dependence of the mobility around the Fermi energy. Second, the high field negative MR originates from the electron-electron interaction (EEI). The transition from the diffusive to the ballistic regime is observed. The amplitude of the EEI correction points towards the coexistence of both long and short range disorder in these samples.
  • Traditional spintronics relies on spin transport by charge carriers, such as electrons in semiconductor crystals. This brings several complications: the Pauli principle prevents the carriers from moving with the same speed; Coulomb repulsion leads to rapid dephasing of electron flows. Spin-optronics is a valuable alternative to traditional spintronics. In spin-optronic devices the spin currents are carried by electrically neutral bosonic quasi-particles: excitons or exciton-polaritons. They can form highly coherent quantum liquids and carry spins over macroscopic distances. The price to pay is a finite life-time of the bosonic spin carriers. We present the theory of exciton ballistic spin transport which may be applied to a range of systems where bosonic spin transport has been reported, in particular, to indirect excitons in coupled GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells. We describe the effect of spin-orbit interaction of electrons and holes on the exciton spin, account for the Zeeman effect induced by external magnetic fields, long range and short range exchange splittings of the exciton resonances. We also consider exciton transport in the non-linear regime and discuss the definitions of exciton spin current, polarization current and spin conductivity.
  • We demonstrate that the carrier concentration of epitaxial graphene devices grown on the C-face of a SiC substrate is efficiently modulated by a buried gate. The gate is fabricated via the implantation of nitrogen atoms in the SiC crystal, 200 nm below the surface, and works well at intermediate temperatures: 40K-80K. The Dirac point is observed at moderate gate voltages (1-20V) depending upon the surface preparation. For temperatures below 40K, the gate is inefficient as the buried channel is frozen out. However, the carrier concentration in graphene remains very close to the value set at T\sim 40K. The absence of parallel conduction is evidenced by the observation of the half-integer quantum Hall effect at various concentrations at T\sim 4K. These observations pave the way to a better understanding of intrinsic properties of epitaxial graphene and are promising for applications such as quantum metrology.
  • We separate localization and interaction effects in epitaxial graphene devices grown on the C-face of a 4H-SiC substrate by analyzing the low temperature conductivities. Weak localization and antilocalization are extracted at low magnetic fields, after elimination of a geometric magnetoresistance and subtraction of the magnetic field dependent Drude conductivity. The electron electron interaction correction is extracted at higher magnetic fields, where localization effects disappear. Both phenomena are weak but sizable and of the same order of magnitude. If compared to graphene on silicon dioxide, electron electron interaction on epitaxial graphene are not significantly reduced by the larger dielectric constant of the SiC substrate.
  • Using high temperature annealing conditions with a graphite cap covering the C-face of an 8deg off-axis 4H-SiC sample, large and homogeneous single epitaxial graphene layers have been grown. Raman spectroscopy shows evidence of the almost free-standing character of these monolayer graphene sheets, which was confirmed by magneto-transport measurements. We find a moderate p-type doping, high carrier mobility and half integer Quantum Hall effect typical of high quality graphene samples. This opens the way to a fully compatible integration of graphene with SiC devices on the wafers that constitute the standard in today's SiC industry.
  • The magneto-conductance in YBCO grain boundary Josephson junctions, displays fluctuations at low temperatures of mesoscopic origin. The morphology of the junction suggests that transport occurs in narrow channels across the grain boundary line, with a large Thouless energy. Nevertheless the measured fluctuation amplitude decreases quite slowly when increasing the voltage up to values about twenty times the Thouless energy, of the order of the nominal superconducting gap. Our findings show the coexistence of supercurrent and quasiparticle current in the junction conduction even at high nonequilibrium conditions. Model calculations confirm the reduced role of quasiparticle relaxation at temperatures up to 3 Kelvin.
  • Magneto-fluctuations of the normal resistance RN have been reproducibly observed in YBa2Cu3O7-d biepitaxial grain boundary junctions at low temperatures. We attribute them to mesoscopic transport in narrow channels across the grain boundary line, occurring in an unusual energy regime. The Thouless energy appears to be the relevant energy scale. Possible implications on the understanding of coherent transport of quasiparticles in HTS and of the dissipation mechanisms are discussed.
  • Spin-orbit interaction in a quantum dot couples far infrared radiation to non center of mass excitation modes, even for parabolic confinement and dipole approximation. The intensities of the absorption peaks satisfy the optical sum rule, giving direct information on the total number of electrons inside the dot. In the case of a circularly polarized radiation the sum rule is insensitive to the strength of a Rashba spin-orbit coupling due to an electric field orthogonal to the dot plane, but not to other sources of spin-orbit interaction, thus allowing to discriminate between the two.
  • We perform the investigations of the resonant tunneling via impurities embedded in the AlAs barrier of a single GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. In the $I(V)$ characteristics measured at 30mK, the contribution of individual donors is resolved and the fingerprints of phonon assistance in the tunneling process are seen. The latter is confirmed by detailed analysis of the tunneling rates and the modeling of the resonant tunneling contribution to the current. Moreover, fluctuations of the local structure of the DOS (LDOS) and Fermi edge singularities are observed.
  • Our study presents experimental measurements of the contact and longitudinal voltage drops in Hall bars, as a function of the current amplitude. We are interested in the heating phenomenon which takes place before the breakdown of the quantum Hall effect, i.e. the pre-breakdown regime. Two types of samples has been investigated, at low temperature (4.2 and 1.5K) and high magnetic field (up to 13 T). The Hall bars have several different widths, and our observations clearly demonstrate that the size of the sample influences the heating phenomenon. By measuring the critical currents of both contact and longitudinal voltages, as a function of the filling factor (around $i=2$), we highlight the presence of a high electric field domain near the source contact, which is observable only in samples whose width is smaller than 400 microns.
  • This paper reports on an experimental study of the contact resistance of Hall bars in the Quantum Hall Effect regime while increasing the current through the sample. These measurements involve also the longitudinal resistance and they have been always performed before the breakdown of the Quantum Hall Effect. Our investigations are restricted to the $i=2$ plateau which is used in all metrological measurements of the von Klitzing constant $R_K$. A particular care has been taken concerning the configuration of the measurement. Four configurations were used for each Hall bar by reversing the current and the magnetic field polarities. Several samples with different width have been studied and we observed that the critical current for the contact resistance increases with the width of the Hall bar as previously observed for the critical current of the longitudinal resistance. The critical currents exhibit either a linear or a sublinear increase. All our observations are interpreted in the current understanding of the Quantum hall effect brekdown. Our analysis suggests that a heated region appears at the current contact, develops and then extends in the whole sample while increasing the current. Consequently, we propose to use the contact resistance as an electronic thermometer for the Hall fluid.
  • We have calculated the linear magnetoconductance across a vertical parabolic Quantum Dot with a magnetic field in the direction of the current. Gate voltage and magnetic field are tuned at the degeneracy point between the occupancies N=2 and N=3, close to the Singlet-Triplet transition for N=2. We find that the conductance is enhanced prior to the transition by nearby crossings of the levels of the 3 particle dot. Immediately after it is depressed by roughly 1/3, as long as the total spin S of the 3 electron ground state doesn't change from S=1/2 to S=3/2, due to spin selection rule. At low temperature this dip is very sharp, but the peak is recovered by increasing the temperature.
  • We have found that the local density of states fluctuations (LDOSF) in a disordered metal, detected using an impurity in the barrier as a spectrometer, undergo enhanced (with respect to SdH and dHvA effects) oscillations in strong magnetic fields, omega _c\tau > 1. We attribute this to the dominant role of the states near bottoms of Landau bands which give the major contribution to the LDOSF and are most strongly affected by disorder. We also demonstrate that in intermediate fields the LDOSF increase with B in accordance with the results obtained in the diffusion approximation.
  • One-point time-series measurements limit the observation of three-dimensional fully developed turbulence to one dimension. For one-dimensional models, like multiplicative branching processes, this implies that the energy flux from large to small scales is not conserved locally. This then renders the random weights used in the cascade curdling to be different from the multipliers obtained from a backward averaging procedure. The resulting multiplier distributions become solutions of a fix-point problem. With a further restoration of homogeneity, all observed correlations between multipliers in the energy dissipation field can be understood in terms of simple scale-invariant multiplicative branching processes.
  • A study of magneto-transport through quantum dots is presented. The model allows to analyze tunnelling both from bulk-like contacts and from 2D accumulation layers. The fine features in the I-V characteristics due to the quantum dot states are known to be shifted to different voltages depending upon the value of the magnetic field. While this effect is also well reproduced by our calculations, in this work we concentrate on the amplitude of each current resonance as a function of the magnetic field. Such amplitudes show oscillations reflecting the variation of the density of states at the Fermi energy in the emitter. Furthermore the amplitude increases as a function of the magnetic field for certain features while it decreases for others. In particular we demonstrate that the behaviour of the amplitude of the current resonances is linked to the value of the angular momentum of each dot level through which tunnelling occurs. We show that a selection rule on the angular momentum must be satisfied. As a consequence, tunnelling through specific dot states is strongly suppresses and sometimes prohibited altogether by the presence of the magnetic field. This will allow to extract from the experimental curves detailed information on the nature of the quantum dot wavefunctions involved in the electronic transport. Furthermore, when tunnelling occurs from a 2D accumulation layer to the quantum dot, the presence of a magnetic field hugely increases the strength of some resonant features. This effect is predicted by our model and, to the best of our knowledge, has never been observed.