• The magnetic order in antiferromagnetic (AF) materials is hard to control with external magnetic fields. However, recent advances in detecting and manipulating AF order electrically have opened up new prospects for these materials in basic and applied spintronics research. Using x-ray magnetic linear dichroism microscopy, we show here that staggered effective fields generated by electrical current can induce reproducible and reversible modification of the antiferromagnetic domain structure in microdevices fabricated from a tetragonal CuMnAs thin film. The current-induced domain switching is inhomogeneous at the submicron level. A clear correlation between the average domain orientation and the anisotropy of the electrical resistance is demonstrated.
  • The paper reports optical orientation experiments performed in the narrow GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells doped with Mn. We experimentally demonstrate a control over the spin polarization by means of the optical orientation via the impurity-to-band excitation and observe a sign inversion of the luminescence polarization depending on the pump power. The g factor of a hole localized on the Mn acceptor in the quantum well was also found to be considerably modified from its bulk value due to the quantum confinement effect. This finding shows the importance of the local environment on magnetic properties of the dopants in semiconductor nanostructures.
  • For the prototype diluted ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As, there is a fundamental concern about the electronic states near the Fermi level, i.e., whether the Fermi level resides in a well-separated impurity band derived from Mn doping (impurity-band model) or in the valence band that is already merged with the Mn-derived impurity band (valence-band model). We investigate this question by carefully shifting the Fermi level by means of carrier compensation. We use helium-ion implantation, a standard industry technology, to precisely compensate the hole doping of GaAs-based diluted ferromagnetic semiconductors while keeping the Mn concentration constant. We monitor the change of Curie temperature ($T_C$) and conductivity. For a broad range of samples including (Ga,Mn)As and (Ga,Mn)(As,P) with various Mn and P concentrations, we observe a smooth decrease of $T_C$ with carrier compensation over a wide temperature range while the conduction is changed from metallic to insulating. The existence of $T_C$ below 10\,K is also confirmed in heavily compensated samples. Our experimental results are naturally explained within the valence-band picture.
  • Antiferromagnets (AFs) are remarkable magnetically ordered materials that due to the absence of a net magnetic moment do not generate dipolar fields and are insensitive to external magnetic field perturbations. However, it has been notoriously difficult to control antiferromagnetic moments by any practical means suitable for device applications. This has left AFs over their hundred years history virtually unexploited and only poorly explored, in striking contrast to the thousands of years of fascination and utility of ferromagnetism. Very recently it has been predicted and experimentally confirmed that relativistic spin-orbit torques can provide the means for efficient electrical control of an AF. Here we place the emerging field of antiferromagnetic spintronics on the map of non-volatile solid state memory technologies. We demonstrate the complete write/store/read functionality in an antiferromagnetic CuMnAs bit cell embedded in a standard printed circuit board communicating with a computer via a USB interface. We show that the elementary-shape bit cells fabricated from a single-layer AF are electrically written on timescales ranging from milliseconds to nanoseconds and we demonstrate their deterministic multi-level switching. The multi-level cell characteristics, reflecting series of reproducible, electrically controlled domain reconfigurations, allow us to integrate memory and signal counter functionalities within the bit cell.
  • Domain wall motion driven by ultra-short laser pulses is a prerequisite for envisaged low-power spintronics combining storage of information in magneto electronic devices with high speed and long distance transmission of information encoded in circularly polarized light. Here we demonstrate the conversion of the circular polarization of incident femtosecond laser pulses into inertial displacement of a domain wall in a ferromagnetic semiconductor. In our study we combine electrical measurements and magneto-optical imaging of the domain wall displacement with micromagnetic simulations. The optical spin transfer torque acts over a picosecond recombination time of the spin polarized photo-carriers which only leads to a deformation of the internal domain wall structure. We show that subsequent depinning and micro-meter distance displacement without an applied magnetic field or any other external stimuli can only occur due to the inertia of the domain wall.
  • We propose a novel hybrid single-electron device for reprogrammable low-power logic operations, the magnetic single-electron transistor (MSET). The device consists of an aluminium single-electron transistors with a GaMnAs magnetic back-gate. Changing between different logic gate functions is realized by reorienting the magnetic moments of the magnetic layer which induce a voltage shift on the Coulomb blockade oscillations of the MSET. We show that we can arbitrarily reprogram the function of the device from an n-type SET for in-plane magnetization of the GaMnAs layer to p-type SET for out-of-plane magnetization orientation. Moreover, we demonstrate a set of reprogrammable Boolean gates and its logical complement at the single device level. Finally, we propose two sets of reconfigurable binary gates using combinations of two MSETs in a pull-down network.
  • We demonstrate optical manipulation of the position of a domain wall in a dilute magnetic semiconductor, GaMnAsP. Two main contributions are identified. Firstly, photocarrier spin exerts a spin transfer torque on the magnetization via the exchange interaction. The direction of the domain wall motion can be controlled using the helicity of the laser. Secondly, the domain wall is attracted to the hot-spot generated by the focused laser. Unlike magnetic field driven domain wall depinning, these mechanisms directly drive domain wall motion, providing an optical tweezer like ability to position and locally probe domain walls.
  • Over the past two decades, the research of (Ga,Mn)As has led to a deeper understanding of relativistic spin-dependent phenomena in magnetic systems. It has also led to discoveries of new effects and demonstrations of unprecedented functionalities of experimental spintronic devices with general applicability to a wide range of materials. In this article we review the basic material properties that make (Ga,Mn)As a favorable test-bed system for spintronics research and discuss contributions of (Ga,Mn)As studies in the general context of the spin-dependent phenomena and device concepts. Special focus is on the spin-orbit coupling induced effects and the reviewed topics include the interaction of spin with electrical current, light, and heat.
  • We report on the determination of micromagnetic parameters of epilayers of the ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As, which has easy axis in the sample plane, and (Ga,Mn)(As,P) which has easy axis perpendicular to the sample plane. We use an optical analog of ferromagnetic resonance where the laser-pulse-induced precession of magnetization is measured directly in the time domain. By the analysis of a single set of pump-and-probe magneto-optical data we determined the magnetic anisotropy fields, the spin stiffness and the Gilbert damping constant in these two materials. We show that incorporation of 10% of phosphorus in (Ga,Mn)As with 6% of manganese leads not only to the expected sign change of the perpendicular to plane anisotropy field but also to an increase of the Gilbert damping and to a reduction of the spin stiffness. The observed changes in the micromagnetic parameters upon incorporating P in (Ga,Mn)As are consistent with the reduced hole density, conductivity, and Curie temperature of the (Ga,Mn)(As,P) material. We report that the magnetization precession damping is stronger for the n = 1 spin wave resonance mode than for the n = 0 uniform magnetization precession mode.
  • Recent observations of current-induced magnetization switching at ferromagnet/normal-conductor interfaces have important consequences for future magnetic memory technology. In one interpretation, the switching originates from carriers with spin-dependent scattering giving rise to a relativistic anti-damping spin-orbit torque (SOT) in structures with broken space-inversion symmetry. The alternative interpretation combines the relativistic spin Hall effect (SHE), making the normal-conductor an injector of a spin-current, with the non-relativistic spin-transfer torque (STT) in the ferromagnet. Remarkably, the SHE in these experiments originates from the Berry phase effect in the band structure of a clean crystal and the anti-damping STT is also based on a disorder-independent transfer of spin from carriers to magnetization. Here we report the observation of an anti-damping SOT stemming from an analogous Berry phase effect to the SHE. The SOT alone can therefore induce magnetization dynamics based on a scattering-independent principle. The ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As we use has a broken space-inversion symmetry in the crystal. This allows us to consider a bare ferromagnetic element which eliminates by design any SHE related contribution to the spin torque. We provide an intuitive picture of the Berry phase origin of the anti-damping SOT and a microscopic modeling of measured data.
  • We investigate the relationship between the Curie temperature TC and the carrier density p in the ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As. Carrier densities are extracted from analysis of the Hall resistance at low temperatures and high magnetic fields. Results are found to be consistent with ion channeling measurements when performed on the same samples. We find that both TC and the electrical conductivity increase monotonically with increasing p, and take their largest values when p is comparable to the concentration of substitutional Mn acceptors. This is inconsistent with models in which the Fermi level is located within a narrow isolated impurity band.
  • Electrical current manipulation of magnetization switching through spin-orbital coupling in ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As Hall bar devices has been investigated. The efficiency of the current-controlled magnetization switching is found to be sensitive to the orientation of the current with respect to the crystalline axes. The dependence of the spin-orbit effective magnetic field on the direction and magnitude of the current is determined from the shifts in the magnetization switching angle. We find that the strain induced effective magnetic field is about three times as large as the Rashba induced magnetic field in our GaMnAs devices.
  • Comment on the recent Nature Materials article by M. Dobrowolska et al., arXiv:1203.1852. We present experimental data showing that the Curie temperature and conductivity of high quality (Ga,Mn)As samples are maximized at low compensation, and thus the magnetic order in (Ga,Mn)As is not consistent with the isolated impurity band scenario.
  • Motivated by the prospects of increased measurement bandwidth, improved signal to noise ratio and access to the full complex magnetic susceptibility we develop a technique to extract microwave voltages from our high resistance (10 k{\Omega}) (Ga,Mn)As microbars. We drive magnetization precession with microwave frequency current, using a mechanism that relies on the spin orbit interaction. A capacitively coupled lambda/2 microstrip resonator is employed as an impedance matching network, enabling us to measure the microwave voltage generated during magnetisation precession.
  • We demonstrate reproducible voltage induced non-volatile switching of the magnetization in an epitaxial thin Fe81Ga19 film. Switching is induced at room temperature and without the aid of an external magnetic field. This is achieved by the modification of the magnetic anisotropy by mechanical strain induced by a piezoelectric transducer attached to the layer. Epitaxial Fe81Ga19 is shown to possess the favourable combination of cubic magnetic anisotropy and large magnetostriction necessary to achieve this functionality with experimentally accessible levels of strain. The switching of the magnetization proceeds by the motion of magnetic domain walls, also controlled by the voltage induced strain.
  • (Ga,Mn)As is at the forefront of research exploring the synergy of magnetism with the physics and technology of semiconductors, and has led to discoveries of new spin-dependent phenomena and functionalities applicable to a wide range of material systems. Its recognition and utility as an ideal model material for spintronics research has been undermined by the large scatter in reported semiconducting doping trends and micromagnetic parameters. In this paper we establish these basic material characteristics by individually optimizing the highly non-equilibrium synthesis for each Mn-doping level and by simultaneously determining all micromagnetic parameters from one set of magneto-optical pump-and-probe measurements. Our (Ga,Mn)As thin-film epilayers, spannig the wide range of accessible dopings, have sharp thermodynamic Curie point singularities typical of uniform magnetic systems. The materials show systematic trends of increasing magnetization, carrier density, and Curie temperature (reaching 188 K) with increasing doping, and monotonous doping dependence of the Gilbert damping constant of ~0.1-0.01 and the spin stiffness of ~2-3 meVnm^2. These results render (Ga,Mn)As well controlled degenerate semiconductor with basic magnetic characteristics comparable to common band ferromagnets.
  • We show that effective electrical control of the magnetic properties in the ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As is possible using the strain induced by a piezoelectric actuator even in the limit of high doping levels and high Curie temperatures, where direct electric gating is not possible. We demonstrate very large and reversible rotations of the magnetic easy axis. We compare the results obtained from magneto-transport and SQUID magnetometry measurements, extracting the dependence of the piezo-induced uniaxial magnetic anisotropy constant upon strain in both cases and detailing the limitations encountered in the latter approach.
  • We use an aluminium single electron transistor with a magnetic gate to directly quantify the chemical potential anisotropy of GaMnAs materials. Uniaxial and cubic contributions to the chemical potential anisotropy are determined from field rotation experiments. In performing magnetic field sweeps we observe additional isotropic magnetic field dependence of the chemical potential which shows a non-monotonic behavior. The observed effects are explained by calculations based on the $\mathbf{k}\cdot\mathbf{p}$ kinetic exchange model of ferromagnetism in GaMnAs. Our device inverts the conventional approach for constructing spin transistors: instead of spin-transport controlled by ordinary gates we spin-gate ordinary charge transport.
  • The incorporation of Fe in GaAs was studied by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy (X-STM). The observed local electronic contrast of a single Fe atom is found to depend strongly on its charge state. We demonstrate that an applied tip voltage can be used to manipulate the valence and spin state of single Fe impurities in GaAs. In particular we can induce a transition from the Fe{3+)- 3d5 - isoelectronic state to the Fe{2+} - 3d6 - ionized acceptor state with an associated change of the spin moment. Fe atoms sometimes produce dark anisotropic features in topographic maps, which is consistent with an interference between different tunneling paths.
  • Atomic Force Microscopy and Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction measurements have revealed the presence of ripples aligned along the $[1\bar{1}0]$ direction on the surface of (Ga,Mn)As layers grown on GaAs(001) substrates and buffer layers, with periodicity of about 50 nm in all samples that have been studied. These samples show the strong symmetry breaking uniaxial magnetic anisotropy normally observed in such materials. We observe a clear correlation between the amplitude of the surface ripples and the strength of the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy component suggesting that these ripples might be the source of such anisotropy.
  • Using atomic force microscopy, we have studied the surface structures of high quality molecular beam epitaxy grown (Ga,Mn)As compound. Several samples with different thickness and Mn concentration, as well as a few (Ga,Mn)(As,P) samples have been investigated. All these samples have shown the presence of periodic ripples aligned along the $[1\bar{1}0]$ direction. From a detailed Fourier analysis we have estimated the period (~50 nm) and the amplitude of these structures.
  • We investigate the spin-polarization of the ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As by point contact Andreev reflection spectroscopy. The conductance spectra are analyzed using a recent theoretical model that accounts for momentum- and spin-dependent scattering at the interface. This allows us to fit the data without resorting, as in the case of the standard spin-dependent Blonder-Tinkham-Klapwijk (BTK) model, to an effective temperature or a statistical distribution of superconducting gaps. We find a transport polarization PC{\approx}57%, in considerably better agreement with the k{\cdot}p kinetic-exchange model of (Ga,Mn)As, than the significantly larger estimates inferred from the BTK model. The temperature dependence of the conductance spectra is fully analyzed.
  • Current-driven magnetic domain wall motion is demonstrated in the quaternary ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)(As,P) at temperatures well below the ferromagnetic transition temperature, with critical currents of the order 10^5Acm^-2. This is enabled by a much weaker domain wall pinning compared to (Ga,Mn)As layers grown on a strain-relaxed buffer layer. The critical current is shown to be comparable with theoretical predictions. The wide temperature range over which domain wall motion can be achieved indicates that this is a promising system for developing an improved understanding of spin-transfer torque in systems with strong spin-orbit interaction.
  • We have investigated the domain wall resistance for two types of domain walls in a (Ga,Mn)As Hall bar with perpendicular magnetization. A sizeable positive intrinsic DWR is inferred for domain walls that are pinned at an etching step, which is quite consistent with earlier observations. However, much lower intrinsic domain wall resistance is obtained when domain walls are formed by pinning lines in unetched material. This indicates that the spin transport across a domain wall is strongly influenced by the nature of the pinning.
  • We report high resolution x-ray diffraction measurements of (Ga,Mn)As and (Ga,Mn)(As,P) epilayers. We observe a structural anisotropy in the form of stacking faults which are present in the (111) and (11-1) planes and absent in the (-111) and (1-11) planes. The stacking faults produce no macroscopic strain. They occupy 0.01 - 0.1 per cent of the epilayer volume. Full-potential density functional calculations evidence an attraction of Mn_Ga impurities to the stacking faults. We argue that the enhanced Mn density along the common [1-10] direction of the stacking fault planes produces sufficiently strong [110]/[1-10] symmetry breaking mechanism to account for the in-plane uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy of these ferromagnetic semiconductors.