• F. Acero, J.-T. Acquaviva, R. Adam, N. Aghanim, M. Allen, M. Alves, R. Ammanouil, R. Ansari, A. Araudo, E. Armengaud, B. Ascaso, E. Athanassoula, D. Aubert, S. Babak, A. Bacmann, A. Banday, K. Barriere, F. Bellossi, J.-P. Bernard, M. G. Bernardini, M. Béthermin, E. Blanc, L. Blanchet, J. Bobin, S. Boissier, C. Boisson, A. Boselli, A. Bosma, S. Bosse, S. Bottinelli, F. Boulanger, R. Boyer, A. Bracco, C. Briand, M. Bucher, V. Buat, L. Cambresy, M. Caillat, J.-M. Casandjian, E. Caux, S. Célestin, M. Cerruti, P. Charlot, E. Chassande-Mottin, S. Chaty, N. Christensen, L. Ciesla, N. Clerc, J. Cohen-Tanugi, I. Cognard, F. Combes, B. Comis, S. Corbel, B. Cordier, M. Coriat, R. Courtin, H. Courtois, B. Da Silva, E. Daddi, R. Dallier, E. Dartois, K. Demyk, J.-M. Denis, L. Denis, A. Djannati-Ataï, J.-F. Donati, M. Douspis, W. van Driel, M. N. El Korso, E. Falgarone, A. Fantina, T. Farges, A. Ferrari, C. Ferrari, K. Ferrière, R. Flamary, N. Gac, S. Gauffre, F. Genova, J. Girard, I. Grenier, J.-M. Griessmeier, P. Guillard, L. Guillemot, F. Gulminelli, A. Gusdorf, E. Habart, F. Hammer, P. Hennebelle, F. Herpin, O. Hervet, A. Hughes, O. Ilbert, M. Janvier, E. Josselin, A. Julier, C. Lachaud, G. Lagache, R. Lallement, S. Lambert, L. Lamy, M. Langer, P. Larzabal, G. Lavaux, T. Le Bertre, O. Le Fèvre, A. Le Tiec, B. Lefloch, M. Lehnert, M. Lemoine-Goumard, F. Levrier, M. Limousin, D. Lis, A. López-Sepulcre, J. Macias-Perez, C. Magneville, A. Marcowith, J. Margueron, G. Marquette, D. Marshall, L. Martin, D. Mary, S. Masson, S. Maurogordato, C. Mazauric, Y. Mellier, M.-A. Miville-Deschênes, L. Montier, F. Mottez, D. Mourard, N. Nesvadba, J.-F. Nezan, P. Noterdaeme, J. Novak, P. Ocvirk, M. Oertel, X. Olive, V. Ollier, N. Palanque-Delabrouille, M. Pandey-Pommier, Y. Pennec, M. Pérault, C. Peroux, P. Petit, J. Pétri, A. Petiteau, J. Pety, G. W. Pratt, M. Puech, B. Quertier, E. Raffin, S. Rakotozafy Harison, S. Rawson, M. Renaud, B. Revenu, C. Richard, J. Richard, F. Rincon, I. Ristorcelli, J. Rodriguez, M. Schultheis, C. Schimd, B. Semelin, H. Sol, J.-L. Starck, M. Tagger, C. Tasse, G. Theureau, S. Torchinsky, C. Vastel, S. D. Vergani, L. Verstraete, X. Vigouroux, N. Vilmer, J.-P. Vilotte, N. Webb, N. Ysard, P. Zarka
    March 28, 2018 astro-ph.IM
    The "Square Kilometre Array" (SKA) is a large international radio telescope project characterised, as suggested by its name, by a total collecting area of approximately one square kilometre, and consisting of several interferometric arrays to observe at metric and centimetric wavelengths. The deployment of the SKA will take place in two sites, in South Africa and Australia, and in two successive phases. From its Phase 1, the SKA will be one of the most formidable scientific machines ever deployed by mankind, and by far the most impressive in terms of data throughput and required computing power. With the participation of almost 200 authors from forty research institutes and six private companies, the publication of this French SKA white paper illustrates the strong involvement in the SKA project of the French astronomical community and of a rapidly growing number of major scientific and technological players in the fields of Big Data, high performance computing, energy production and storage, as well as system integration.
  • Evidence is mounting that the small bodies of our Solar System, such as comets and asteroids, have at least partially inherited their chemical composition from the first phases of the Solar System formation. It then appears that the molecular complexity of these small bodies is most likely related to the earliest stages of star formation. It is therefore important to characterize and to understand how the chemical evolution changes with solar-type protostellar evolution. We present here the Large Program "Astrochemical Surveys At IRAM" (ASAI). Its goal is to carry out unbiased millimeter line surveys between 80 and 272 GHz of a sample of ten template sources, which fully cover the first stages of the formation process of solar-type stars, from prestellar cores to the late protostellar phase. In this article, we present an overview of the surveys and results obtained from the analysis of the 3 mm band observations. The number of detected main isotopic species barely varies with the evolutionary stage and is found to be very similar to that of massive star-forming regions. The molecular content in O- and C- bearing species allows us to define two chemical classes of envelopes, whose composition is dominated by either a) a rich content in O-rich complex organic molecules, associated with hot corino sources, or b) a rich content in hydrocarbons, typical of Warm Carbon Chain Chemistry sources. Overall, a high chemical richness is found to be present already in the initial phases of solar-type star formation.
  • Although chemical models predict that the deuterium fractionation in N$_2$H$^+$ is a good evolutionary tracer in the star formation process, the fractionation of nitrogen is still a poorly understood process. Recent models have questioned the similar evolutionary trend expected for the two fractionation mechanisms in N$_2$H$^+$, based on a classical scenario in which ion-neutral reactions occurring in cold gas should have caused an enhancement of the abundance of N$_2$D$^+$, $^{15}$NNH$^+$, and N$^{15}$NH$^+$. In the framework of the ASAI IRAM-30m large program, we have investigated the fractionation of deuterium and $^{15}$N in N$_2$H$^+$ in the best known representatives of the different evolutionary stages of the Sun-like star formation process. The goal is to ultimately confirm (or deny) the classical "ion-neutral reactions" scenario that predicts a similar trend for D and $^{15}$N fractionation. We do not find any evolutionary trend of the $^{14}$N/$^{15}$N ratio from both the $^{15}$NNH$^+$ and N$^{15}$NH$^+$ isotopologues. Therefore, our findings confirm that, during the formation of a Sun-like star, the core evolution is irrelevant in the fractionation of $^{15}$N. The independence of the $^{14}$N/$^{15}$N ratio with time, found also in high-mass star-forming cores, indicates that the enrichment in $^{15}$N revealed in comets and protoplanetary disks is unlikely to happen at core scales. Nevertheless, we have firmly confirmed the evolutionary trend expected for the H/D ratio, with the N$_2$H$^+$/N$_2$D$^+$ ratio decreasing before the pre-stellar core phase, and increasing monotonically during the protostellar phase. We have also confirmed clearly that the two fractionation mechanisms are not related.
  • We report the detection in space of a new molecular species which has been characterized spectroscopically and fully identified from astrophysical data. The observations were carried out with the 30m IRAM telescope. The molecule is ubiquitous as its $J$=2$\rightarrow$1 transition has been found in cold molecular clouds, prestellar cores, and shocks. However, it is not found in the hot cores of Orion-KL and in the carbon-rich evolved star IRC+10216. Three rotational transitions in perfect harmonic relation J'=2/3/5 have been identified in the prestellar core B1b. The molecule has a 1Sigma electronic ground state and its J=2-1 transition presents the hyperfine structure characteristic of a molecule containing a nucleus with spin 1. A careful analysis of possible carriers shows that the best candidate is NS+. The derived rotational constant agrees within 0.3-0.7 % with ab initio calculations. NS+ was also produced in the laboratory to unambiguously validate the astrophysical assignment. The observed rotational frequencies and determined molecular constants confirm the discovery of the nitrogen sulfide cation in space. The chemistry of NS+ and related nitrogen-bearing species has been analyzed by means of a time-dependent gas phase model. The model reproduces well the observed NS/NS+ abundance ratio, in the range 30-50, and indicates that NS+ is formed by reactions of the neutral atoms N and S with the cations SH+ and NH+, respectively.
  • We present here a systematic search for cyanopolyynes in the shock region L1157-B1 and its associated protostar L1157-mm in the framework of the Large Program "Astrochemical Surveys At IRAM" (ASAI), dedicated to chemical surveys of solar-type star forming regions with the IRAM 30m telescope. Observations of the millimeter windows between 72 and 272 GHz permitted the detection of HC$_3$N and its $^{13}$C isotopologues, and HC$_5$N (for the first time in a protostellar shock region). In the shock, analysis of the line profiles shows that the emission arises from the outflow cavities associated with L1157-B1 and L1157-B2. Molecular abundances and excitation conditions were obtained from analysis of the Spectral Line Energy Distributions under the assumption of Local Thermodynamical Equilibrium or using a radiative transfer code in the Large Velocity Gradient approximation. Towards L1157mm, the HC$_3$N emission arises from the cold envelope ($T_{rot}=10$ K) and a higher-excitation region ($T_{rot}$= $31$ K) of smaller extent around the protostar. We did not find any evidence of $^{13}$C or D fractionation enrichment towards L1157-B1. We obtain a relative abundance ratio HC$_3$N/HC$_5$N of 3.3 in the shocked gas. We find an increase by a factor of 30 of the HC$_3$N abundance between the envelope of L1157-mm and the shock region itself. Altogether, these results are consistent with a scenario in which the bulk of HC$_3$N was produced by means of gas phase reactions in the passage of the shock. This scenario is supported by the predictions of a parametric shock code coupled with the chemical model UCL_CHEM.
  • The high-sensitivity of the IRAM 30-m ASAI unbiased spectral survey in the mm-window allows us to detect NO emission towards both the Class I object SVS13-A and the protostellar outflow shock L1157-B1. We detect the hyperfine components of the $^2\Pi_{\rm 1/2}$ $J$ = 3/2 $\to$ 1/2 (at 151 GHz) and the $^2\Pi_{\rm 1/2}$ $J$ = 5/2 $\to$ 3/2 (250 GHz) spectral pattern. The two objects show different NO profiles: (i) SVS13-A emits through narrow (1.5 km s$^{-1}$) lines at the systemic velocity, while (ii) L1157-B1 shows broad ($\sim$ 5 km s$^{-1}$) blue-shifted emission. For SVS13-A the analysis leads to $T_{\rm ex}$ $\geq$ 4 K, $N(\rm NO)$ $\leq$ 3 $\times$ 10$^{15}$ cm$^{-2}$, and indicates the association of NO with the protostellar envelope. In L1157-B1, NO is tracing the extended outflow cavity: $T_{\rm ex}$ $\simeq$ 4--5 K, and $N(\rm NO)$ = 5.5$\pm$1.5 $\times$ 10$^{15}$ cm$^{-2}$. Using C$^{18}$O, $^{13}$C$^{18}$O, C$^{17}$O, and $^{13}$C$^{17}$O ASAI observations we derive an NO fractional abundance less than $\sim$ 10$^{-7}$ for the SVS13-A envelope, in agreement with previous measurements towards extended PDRs and prestellar objects. Conversely, a definite $X(NO)$ enhancement is measured towards L1157-B1, $\sim$ 6 $\times$ 10$^{-6}$, showing that the NO production increases in shocks. The public code UCLCHEM was used to interpret the NO observations, confirming that the abundance observed in SVS13-A can be attained in an envelope with a gas density of 10$^5$ cm$^{-3}$ and a kinetic temperature of 40 K. The NO abundance in L1157-B1 is reproduced with pre-shock densities of 10$^5$ cm$^{-3}$ subjected to a $\sim$ 45 km s$^{-1}$ shock.
  • HCCNC and HNC3 are less commonly found isomers of cyanoacetylene, HC3N, a molecule that is widely found in diverse astronomical sources. We want to know if HNC3 is present in sources other than the dark cloud TMC-1 and how its abundance is relative to that of related molecules. We used the ASAI unbiased spectral survey at IRAM 30m towards the prototypical prestellar core L1544 to search for HNC3 and HCCNC which are by-product of the HC3NH+ recombination, previously detected in this source. We performed a combined analysis of published HNC3 microwave rest frequencies with thus far unpublished millimeter data because of issues with available rest frequency predictions. We determined new spectroscopic parameters for HNC3, produced new predictions and detected it towards L1544. We used a gas-grain chemical modelling to predict the abundances of N-species and compare with the observations. The modelled abundances are consistent with the observations, considering a late stage of the evolution of the prestellar core. However the calculated abundance of HNC3 was found 5-10 times higher than the observed one. The HC3N, HNC3 and HCCNC versus HC3NH+ ratios are compared in the TMC-1 dark cloud and the L1544 prestellar core.
  • Context: Methanol is thought to be mainly formed during the prestellar phase and its deuterated form keeps memory of the conditions at that epoch. Thanks to the unique combination of high angular resolution and sensitivity provided by ALMA, we wish to measure methanol deuteration in the planet formation region around a Class 0 protostar and to understand its origin. Aims: We mapped both the $^{13}$CH$_3$OH and CH$_2$DOH distribution in the inner regions ($\sim$100 au) of the HH212 system in Orion B. To this end, we used ALMA Cycle 1 and Cycle 4 observations in Band 7 with angular resolution down to $\sim$0.15$"$. Results: We detected 6 lines of $^{13}$CH$_3$OH and 13 lines of CH$_2$DOH with upper level energies up to 438 K in temperature units. We derived a rotational temperature of (171 $\pm$ 52) K and column densities of 7$\times$10$^{16}$ cm$^{-2}$ ($^{13}$CH$_3$OH) and 1$\times$10$^{17}$ cm$^{-2}$ (CH$_2$DOH), respectively. Consequently, the D/H ratio is (2.4 $\pm$ 0.4)$\times$10$^{-2}$, a value lower by an order of magnitude with respect to what was previously measured using single dish telescopes toward protostars located in Perseus. Our findings are consistent with the higher dust temperatures in Orion B with respect to that derived for the Perseus cloud. The emission is tracing a rotating structure extending up to 45 au from the jet axis and elongated by 90 au along the jet axis. So far, the origin of the observed emission appears to be related with the accretion disk. Only higher spatial resolution measurements however, will be able to disentangle between different possible scenarios: disk wind, disk atmosphere, or accretion shocks.
  • The early stages of low-mass star formation are likely to be subject to intense ionization by protostellar energetic MeV particles. As a result, the surrounding gas is enriched in molecular ions, such as HCO$^{+}$ and N$_{2}$H$^{+}$. Nonetheless, this phenomenon remains poorly understood for Class 0 objects. Recently, based on Herschel observations taken as part of the key program Chemical HErschel Surveys of Star forming regions (CHESS), a very low HCO$^{+}$/N$_{2}$H$^{+}$ abundance ratio of about 3-4, has been reported toward the protocluster OMC-2 FIR4. This finding suggests a cosmic-ray ionization rate in excess of 10$^{-14}$ s$^{-1}$, much higher than the canonical value of $\zeta$ = 3$\times$10$^{-17}$ s$^{-1}$ (value expected in quiescent dense clouds). To assess the specificity of OMC-2 FIR4, we have extended this study to a sample of sources in low- and intermediate mass. More specifically, we seek to measure the HCO$^{+}$/N$_2$H$^{+}$ abundance ratio from high energy lines (J $\ge$ 6) toward this source sample in order to infer the flux of energetic particles in the warm and dense gas surrounding the protostars. We use observations performed with the Heterodyne Instrument for the FarInfrared spectrometer on board the Herschel Space Observatory toward a sample of 9 protostars. We report HCO$^{+}$/N$_2$H$^{+}$ abundance ratios in the range of 5 up to 73 toward our source sample. The large error bars do not allow us to conclude whether OMC-2~FIR4 is a peculiar source. Nonetheless, an important result is that the measured HCO$^{+}$/N$_2$H$^{+}$ ratio does not vary with the source luminosity. At the present time, OMC-2 FIR4 remains the only source where a high flux of energetic particles is clearly evident. More sensitive and higher angular resolution observations are required to further investigate this process.
  • Context: Modern versions of the Miller-Urey experiment claim that formamide (NH$_2$CHO) could be the starting point for the formation of metabolic and genetic macromolecules. Intriguingly, formamide is indeed observed in regions forming Solar-type stars as well as in external galaxies. Aims: How NH$_2$CHO is formed has been a puzzle for decades: our goal is to contribute to the hotly debated question of whether formamide is mostly formed via gas-phase or grain surface chemistry. Methods: We used the NOEMA interferometer to image NH$_2$CHO towards the L1157-B1 blue-shifted shock, a well known interstellar laboratory, to study how the components of dust mantles and cores released into the gas phase triggers the formation of formamide. Results: We report the first spatially resolved image (size $\sim$ 9", $\sim$ 2300 AU) of formamide emission in a shocked region around a Sun-like protostar: the line profiles are blueshifted and have a FWHM $\simeq$ 5 km s$^{-1}$. A column density of $N_{\rm NH_2CHO}$ = 8 $\times$ 10$^{12}$ cm$^{-1}$, and an abundance (with respect to H-nuclei) of 4 $\times$ 10$^{-9}$ are derived. We show a spatial segregation of formamide with respect to other organic species. Our observations, coupled with a chemical modelling analysis, indicate that the formamide observed in L1157-B1 is formed by gas-phase chemical process, and not on grain surfaces as previously suggested. Conclusions: The SOLIS interferometric observations of formamide provide direct evidence that this potentially crucial brick of life is efficiently formed in the gas-phase around Sun-like protostars.
  • L1157-B1 is the brightest shocked region of the large-scale molecular outflow, considered the prototype of chemically rich outflows, being the ideal laboratory to study how shocks affect the molecular gas. Several deuterated molecules have been previously detected with the IRAM 30m, most of them formed on grain mantles and then released into the gas phase due to the shock. We aim to observationally investigate the role of the different chemical processes at work that lead to formation the of DCN and test the predictions of the chemical models for its formation. We performed high-angular resolution observations with NOEMA of the DCN(2-1) and H13CN(2-1) lines to compute the deuterated fraction, Dfrac(HCN). We detected emission of DCN(2-1) and H13CN(2-1) arising from L1157-B1 shock. Dfrac(HCN) is ~4x10$^{-3}$ and given the uncertainties, we did not find significant variations across the bow-shock. Contrary to HDCO, whose emission delineates the region of impact between the jet and the ambient material, DCN is more widespread and not limited to the impact region. This is consistent with the idea that gas-phase chemistry is playing a major role in the deuteration of HCN in the head of the bow-shock, where HDCO is undetected as it is a product of grain-surface chemistry. The spectra of DCN and H13CN match the spectral signature of the outflow cavity walls, suggesting that their emission result from shocked gas. The analysis of the time dependent gas-grain chemical model UCL-CHEM coupled with a C-type shock model shows that the observed Dfrac(HCN) is reached during the post-shock phase, matching the dynamical timescale of the shock. Our results indicate that the presence of DCN in L1157-B1 is a combination of gas-phase chemistry that produces the widespread DCN emission, dominating in the head of the bow-shock, and sputtering from grain mantles toward the jet impact region.
  • We used the Atacama Large (sub-)Millimeter Array (ALMA) and the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) to image, with an angular resolution of 0.5$''$ (120 au) and 1$''$ (235 au), respectively, the emission from 11 different organic molecules in the protostellar binary NGC1333 IRAS 4A. We clearly disentangled A1 and A2, the two protostellar cores present. For the first time, we were able to derive the column densities and fractional abundances simultaneously for the two objects, allowing us to analyse the chemical differences between them. Molecular emission from organic molecules is concentrated exclusively in A2 even though A1 is the strongest continuum emitter. The protostellar core A2 displays typical hot corino abundances and its deconvolved size is 70 au. In contrast, the upper limits we placed on molecular abundances for A1 are extremely low, lying about one order of magnitude below prestellar values. The difference in the amount of organic molecules present in A1 and A2 ranges between one and two orders of magnitude. Our results suggest that the optical depth of dust emission at these wavelengths is unlikely to be sufficiently high to completely hide a hot corino in A1 similar in size to that in A2. Thus, the significant contrast in molecular richness found between the two sources is most probably real. We estimate that the size of a hypothetical hot corino in A1 should be less than 12 au. Our results favour a scenario in which the protostar in A2 is either more massive and/or subject to a higher accretion rate than A1, as a result of inhomogeneous fragmentation of the parental molecular clump. This naturally explains the smaller current envelope mass in A2 with respect to A1 along with its molecular richness.
  • The interstellar delivery of carbon atoms locked into molecules might be one of the key ingredients for the emergence of life. Cyanopolyynes are carbon chains delimited at their two extremities by an atom of hydrogen and a cyano group, so that they might be excellent reservoirs of carbon. The simplest member, HC3N, is ubiquitous in the galactic interstellar medium and found also in external galaxies. Thus, understanding the growth of cyanopolyynes in regions forming stars similar to our Sun, and what affects it, is particularly relevant. In the framework of the IRAM/NOEMA Large Program SOLIS (Seeds Of Life In Space), we have obtained a map of two cyanopolyynes, HC3N and HC5N, in the protocluster OMC2-FIR4. Because our Sun is thought to be born in a rich cluster, OMC2-FIR4 is one of the closest and best known representatives of the environment in which the Sun may have been born. We find a HC3N/HC5N abundance ratio across the source in the range ~ 1 - 30, with the smallest values (< 10) in FIR5 and in the Eastern region of FIR4. The ratios < 10 can be reproduced by chemical models only if: (1) the cosmic-ray ionisation rate $\zeta$ is ~ $4 \times 10^{-14}$ s$^{-1}$; (2) the gaseous elemental ratio C/O is close to unity; (3) O and C are largely depleted. The large $\zeta$ is comparable to that measured in FIR4 by previous works and was interpreted as due to a flux of energetic (> 10 MeV) particles from embedded sources. We suggest that these sources could lie East of FIR4 and FIR5. A temperature gradient across FIR4, with T decreasing by about 10 K, could also explain the observed change in the HC3N/HC5N line ratio, without the need of a cosmic ray ionisation rate gradient. However, even in this case, a high constant cosmic-ray ionisation rate (of the order of $10^{-14}$ s$^{-1}$) is necessary to reproduce the observations.
  • The shock L1157-B1 driven by the low-mass protostar L1157-mm is an unique environment to investigate the chemical enrichment due to molecules released from dust grains. IRAM-30m and Plateau de Bure Interferometer observations allow a census of Si-bearing molecules in L1157-B1. We detect SiO and its isotopologues and, for the first time in a shock, SiS. The strong gradient of the [SiO/SiS] abundance ratio across the shock (from >=180 to ~25) points to a different chemical origin of the two species. SiO peaks where the jet impacts the cavity walls ([SiO/H2] ~ 1e-6), indicating that SiO is directly released from grains or rapidly formed from released Si in the strong shock occurring at this location. In contrast, SiS is only detected at the head of the cavity opened by previous ejection events ([SiS/H2] ~ 2e-8). This suggests that SiS is not directly released from the grain cores but instead should be formed through slow gas-phase processes using part of the released silicon. This finding shows that Si-bearing molecules can be useful to distinguish regions where grains or gas-phase chemistry dominates.
  • We report on a systematic search for oxygen-bearing Complex Organic Molecules (COMs) in the Solar-like protostellar shock region L1157-B1, as part of the IRAM Large Program "Astrochemical Surveys At IRAM" (ASAI). Several COMs are unambiguously detected, some for the first time, such as ketene H$_2$CCO, dimethyl ether (CH$_3$OCH$_3$) and glycolaldehyde (HCOCH$_2$OH), and others firmly confirmed, such as formic acid (HCOOH) and ethanol (C$_2$H$_5$OH). Thanks to the high sensitivity of the observations and full coverage of the 1, 2 and 3mm wavelength bands, we detected numerous (10--125) lines from each of the detected species. Based on a simple rotational diagram analysis, we derive the excitation conditions and the column densities of the detected COMs. Combining our new results with those previously obtained towards other protostellar objects, we found a good correlation between ethanol, methanol and glycolaldehyde. We discuss the implications of these results on the possible formation routes of ethanol and glycolaldehyde.
  • Protostellar jets and outflows are key features of the star-formation process, and primary processes of the feedback of young stars on the interstellar medium. Understanding the underlying shocks is necessary to explain how jets and outflows are launched, and to quantify their chemical and energetic impacts on the surrounding medium. We performed a high-spectral resolution study of the [OI]$_{\rm 63 \mu m}$ emission in the outflow of the intermediate-mass Class 0 protostar Cep E-mm. We present observations of the OI $^3$P$_1 \rightarrow$ $^3$P$_2$, OH between $^2\Pi_{1/2}$ $J = 3/2$ and $J = 1/2$ at 1837.8 GHz, and CO (16-15) lines with SOFIA-GREAT at three positions in the Cep E outflow: mm (the driving protostar), BI (in the southern lobe), and BII (the terminal position in the southern lobe). The CO line is detected at all three positions. The OI line is detected in BI and BII, whereas the OH line is not detected. In BII, we identify three kinematical components in OI and CO, already detected in CO: the jet, the HH377 terminal bow-shock, and the outflow cavity. The OI column density is higher in the outflow cavity than in the jet, which itself is higher than in the terminal shock. The terminal shock is where the abundance ratio of OI to CO is the lowest (about 0.2), whereas the jet component is atomic (ratio $\sim$2.7). In the jet, we compare the OI observations with shock models that successfully fit the integrated intensity of 10 CO lines: these models do not fit the OI data. The high intensity of OI emission points towards the propagation of additional dissociative or alternative FUV-irradiated shocks, where the illumination comes from the shock itself. From the sample of low-to-high mass protostellar outflows where similar observations have been performed, the effects of illumination seem to increase with the mass of the protostar.
  • In the BHR71 region, two low-mass protostars drive two distinguishable outflows. They constitute an ideal laboratory to investigate the effects of shock chemistry and the mechanisms that led to their formation. We aim to define the morphology of the warm gas component of the BHR 71 outflow and at modelling its shocked component. We present the first far infrared Herschel images of the BHR71 outflow in the CO(14-13), H$_2$O (2$_{21}$-1$_{10}$), H$_2$O (2$_{12}$-1$_{01}$) and [OI] 145 $\mu$m, lines, revealing the presence of several knots of warm, shocked gas associated with fast outflowing gas. In two of these knots we performed a detailed study of the physical conditions by comparing a large set of transitions from several molecules to a grid of shock models. Herschel lines ratios in the outflow knots are quite similar, showing that the excitation conditions of the fast moving gas do not change significantly within the first $\sim$ 0.068 pc of the outflow, apart at the extremity of the southern blue-shifted lobe that is expanding outside the molecular cloud. Rotational diagram, spectral line profile and LVG analysis of the CO lines in knot A show the presence of two gas components: one extended, cold ($T\sim$80 K) and dense ($n$(H$_2$) = 3$\times$10$^5$-4$\times$10$^6$ cm$^{-3}$) and another compact (18 arcsec), warm ($T$ = 1700-2200 K) with slightly lower density ($n$(H$_2$) = (2-6)$\times$10$^4$ cm$^{-3}$). In the two brightest knots (where we performed shock modelling) we found that H$_2$ and CO are well fitted with non-stationary (young) shocks. These models, however, significantly underestimate the observed fluxes of [OI] and OH lines, but are not too far off those of H$_2$O, calling for an additional, possibly dissociative, J-type shock component. Our modelling indirectly suggests that an additional shock component exists, possibly a remnant of the primary jet
  • The mechanisms leading to the formation of disks around young stellar objects (YSOs) and to the launching of the associated jets are crucial to the understanding of the earliest stages of star and planet formation. HH 212 is a privileged laboratory to study a pristine jet-disk system. Therefore we investigate the innermost region ($<100$ AU) around the HH 212-MM1 protostar through ALMA band\,7 observations of methanol. The 8 GHz bandwidth spectrum towards the peak of the continuum emission of the HH 212 system reveals at least 19 transitions of methanol. Several of these lines (among which several vibrationally excited lines in the v$_{\rm t}=1,2$ states) have upper energies above 500 K. They originate from a compact ($<135$ AU in diameter), hot ($\sim 295$ K) region elongated along the direction of the SiO jet. We performed a fit in the $uv$ plane of various velocity channels of the strongest high-excitation lines. The blue- and red-shifted velocity centroids are shifted roughly symmetrically on either side of the jet axis, indicating that the line-of-sight velocity beyond 0.7 km s$^{-1}$ from systemic is dominated by rotational motions. The velocity increases moving away from the protostar further indicating that the emission of methanol is not associated with a Keplerian disk or rotating-infalling cavity, and it is more likely associated with outflowing gas. We speculate that CH$_3$OH traces a disk wind gas accelerated at the base. The launching region would be at a radius of a few astronomical units from the YSO.
  • Cyanopolyynes are chains of carbon atoms with an atom of hydrogen and a CN group on either side. They are detected almost everywhere in the ISM, as well as in comets. In the past, they have been used to constrain the age of some molecular clouds, since their abundance is predicted to be a strong function of time. We present an extensive study of the cyanopolyynes distribution in the solar-type protostar IRAS16293-2422 based on TIMASSS IRAM-30m observations. The goals are (i) to obtain a census of the cyanopolyynes in this source and of their isotopologues; (ii) to derive how their abundance varies across the protostar envelope; and (iii) to obtain constraints on the history of IRAS16293-2422. We detect several lines from HC3N and HC5N, and report the first detection of DC3N, in a solar-type protostar. We found that the HC3N abundance is roughly constant (~1.3x10^(-11)) in the outer cold envelope of IRAS16293-2422, and it increases by about a factor 100 in the inner region where Tdust>80K. The HC5N has an abundance similar to HC3N in the outer envelope and about a factor of ten lower in the inner region. The HC3N abundance derived in the inner region, and where the increase occurs, also provide strong constraints on the time taken for the dust to warm up to 80K, which has to be shorter than ~10^3-10^4yr. Finally, the cyanoacetylene deuteration is about 50\% in the outer envelope and <5$\% in the warm inner region. The relatively low deuteration in the warm region suggests that we are witnessing a fossil of the HC3N abundantly formed in the tenuous phase of the pre-collapse and then frozen into the grain mantles at a later phase. The accurate analysis of the cyanopolyynes in IRAS16293-2422 unveils an important part of its past story. It tells us that IRAS16293-2422 underwent a relatively fast (<10^5yr) collapse and a very fast (<10^3-10^4yr) warming up of the cold material to 80K.
  • Fast jets are thought to be a crucial ingredient of star formation because they might extract angular momentum from the disk and thus allow mass accretion onto the star. However, it is unclear whether jets are ubiquitous, and likewise, their contribution to mass and angular momentum extraction during protostar formation remains an open question. Our aim is to investigate the ejection process in the low-mass Class 0 protostar L1157. This source is associated with a spectacular bipolar outflow, and the recent detection of high-velocity SiO suggests the occurrence of a jet. Observations of CO 2-1 and SiO 5-4 at 0.8" resolution were obtained with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer as part of the CALYPSO large program. The jet and outflow structure were fit with a precession model. We derived the column density of CO and SiO, as well as the jet mass-loss rate and mechanical luminosity. High-velocity CO and SiO emission resolve for the first time the first 200 au of the outflow-driving molecular jet. The jet is strongly asymmetric, with the blue lobe 0.65 times slower than the red lobe. This suggests that the large-scale asymmetry of the outflow is directly linked to the jet velocity and that the asymmetry in the launching mechanism has been at work for the past 1800 yr. Velocity asymmetries are common in T Tauri stars, which suggests that the jet formation mechanism from Class 0 to Class II stages might be similar. Our model simultaneously fits the inner jet and the clumpy 0.2 pc scale outflow by assuming that the jet precesses counter-clockwise on a cone inclined by 73 degree to the line of sight with an opening angle of 8 degree on a period of 1640 yr. The estimated jet mass flux and mechanical luminosity are 7.7e-7 Msun/yr, and 0.9 Lsun, indicating that the jet could extract at least 25% of the gravitational energy released by the forming star.
  • In a previous study of the L1157 B1 shocked cavity, a comparison between NH$_3$(1$_0$-$0_0$) and H$_2$O(1$_{\rm 10}$--1$_{\rm 01}$) transitions showed a striking difference in the profiles, with H$_2$O emitting at definitely higher velocities. This behaviour was explained as a result of the high-temperature gas-phase chemistry occurring in the postshock gas in the B1 cavity of this outflow. If the differences in behaviour between ammonia and water are indeed a consequence of the high gas temperatures reached during the passage of a shock, then one should find such differences to be ubiquitous among chemically rich outflows. In order to determine whether the difference in profiles observed between NH$_3$ and H$_2$O is unique to L1157 or a common characteristic of chemically rich outflows, we have performed Herschel-HIFI observations of the NH$_3$(1$_0$-0$_0$) line at 572.5 GHz in a sample of 8 bright low-mass outflow spots already observed in the H$_2$O(1$_{\rm 10}$--1$_{\rm 01}$) line within the WISH KP. We detected the ammonia emission at high-velocities at most of the outflows positions. In all cases, the water emission reaches higher velocities than NH$_3$, proving that this behaviour is not exclusive of the L1157-B1 position. Comparisons with a gas-grain chemical and shock model confirms, for this larger sample, that the behaviour of ammonia is determined principally by the temperature of the gas.
  • In the context of the ASAI (Astrochemical Surveys At IRAM) project, we carried out an unbiased spectral survey in the millimeter window towards the well known low-mass Class I source SVS13-A. The high sensitivity reached (3-12 mK) allowed us to detect at least 6 HDO broad (FWHM ~ 4-5 km/s) emission lines with upper level energies up to Eu = 837 K. A non-LTE LVG analysis implies the presence of very hot (150-260 K) and dense (> 3 10^7 cm-3) gas inside a small radius ($\sim$ 25 AU) around the star, supporting, for the first time, the occurrence of a hot corino around a Class I protostar. The temperature is higher than expected for water molecules are sublimated from the icy dust mantles (~ 100 K). Although we cannot exclude we are observig the effects of shocks and/or winds at such small scales, this could imply that the observed HDO emission is tracing the water abundance jump expected at temperatures ~ 220-250 K, when the activation barrier of the gas phase reactions leading to the formation of water can be overcome. We derive X(HDO) ~ 3 10-6, and a H2O deuteration > 1.5 10-2, suggesting that water deuteration does not decrease as the protostar evolves from the Class 0 to the Class I stage.
  • Barnard B1b has revealed as one of the most interesting globules from the chemical and dynamical point of view. It presents a rich molecular chemistry characterized by large abundances of deuterated and complex molecules. Furthermore, it hosts an extremely young Class 0 object and one candidate to First Hydrostatic Core (FHSC). Our aim was to determine the cosmic ray ionization rate and the depletion factors in this extremely young star forming region. We carried out a spectral survey towards Barnard 1b as part of the IRAM Large program ASAI using the IRAM 30-m telescope at Pico Veleta (Spain). This provided a very complete inventory of neutral and ionic C-, N- and S- bearing species with, up to our knowledge, the first secure detections of the deuterated ions DCS+ and DOCO+. We used a state-of-the-art pseudo-time-dependent gas-phase chemical model to determine the value of the cosmic ray ionization rate and the depletion factors. The observational data were well fitted with $\zeta_{H_2}$ between 3E-17 s$^{-1}$ and 1E-16 s$^{-1}$. Elemental depletions were estimated to be ~10 for C and O, ~1 for N and ~25 for S. Barnard B1b presents similar depletions of C and O than those measured in pre-stellar cores. The depletion of sulfur is higher than that of C and O but not as extreme as in cold cores. In fact, it is similar to the values found in some bipolar outflows, hot cores and photon-dominated regions. Several scenarios are discussed to account for these peculiar abundances. We propose that it is the consequence of the initial conditions (important outflows and enhanced UV fields in the surroundings) and a rapid collapse (~0.1 Myr) that permits to maintain most S- and N-bearing species in gas phase to great optical depths. The interaction of the compact outflow associated with B1b-S with the surrounding material could enhance the abundances of S-bearing molecules, as well.
  • Aims: Using the unprecedented combination of high resolution and sensitivity offered by ALMA, we aim to investigate whether and how hot corinos, circumstellar disks, and ejected gas are related in young solar-mass protostars. Methods: We observed CH$_3$CHO and deuterated water (HDO) high-excitation ($E_{\rm u}$ up to 335 K) lines towards the Sun-like protostar HH212--MM1. Results: For the first time, we have obtained images of CH$_3$CHO and HDO emission in the inner $\simeq$ 100 AU of HH212. The multifrequency line analysis allows us to contrain the density ($\geq$ 10$^{7}$ cm$^{-3}$), temperature ($\simeq$ 100 K), and CH$_3$CHO abundance ($\simeq$ 0.2--2 $\times$ 10$^{-9}$) of the emitting region. The HDO profile is asymmetric at low velocities ($\leq$ 2 km s$^{-1}$ from $V_{\rm sys}$). If the HDO line is optically thick, this points to an extremely small ($\sim$ 20--40 AU) and dense ($\ge$ 10$^{9}$ cm$^{-3}$) emitting region. Conclusions: We report the first detection of a hot corino in Orion. The HDO asymmetric profile indicates a contribution of outflowing gas from the compact central region, possibly associated with a dense disk wind.
  • Owing to the paucity of sub-arcsecond (sub)mm observations required to probe the innermost regions of newly forming protostars, several fundamental questions are still being debated, such as the existence and coevality of close multiple systems. We study the physical and chemical properties of the jets and protostellar sources in the NGC1333-IRAS4A proto-binary system using continuum emission and molecular tracers of shocked gas. We observed NGC1333-IRAS4A in the SiO(6-5), SO(6_5-5_4), and CO(2-1) lines and the continuum emission at 1.3, 1.4, and 3 mm using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer in the framework of the CALYPSO large program. We clearly disentangle for the first time the outflow emission from the two sources A1 and A2. The two protostellar jets have very different properties: the A1 jet is faster, has a short dynamical timescale (<10^3 yr), and is associated with H2 shocked emission, whereas the A2 jet, which dominates the large-scale emission, is associated with diffuse emission, bends, and emits at slower velocities. The observed bending of the A2 jet is consistent with the change of propagation direction observed at large scale and suggests jet precession on very short timescales (~200-600 yr). In addition, a chemically rich spectrum with emission from several COMs (e.g. HCOOH, CH3OCHO, CH3OCH3) is only detected towards A2. Finally, very high-velocity shocked emission (~50 km s^-1) is observed along the A1 jet. An LTE analysis shows that SiO, SO, and H2CO abundances in the gas phase are enhanced up to (3-4)x10^{-7}, (1.4-1.7)x10^{-6}, and (3-7.9)x10^{-7}, respectively. The intrinsic different properties of the jets and driving sources in NGC1333-IRAS4A suggest different evolutionary stages for the two protostars, with A1 being younger than A2, in a very early stage of star formation previous to the hot-corino phase.