• A long and intense gamma-ray burst (GRB) was detected by INTEGRAL on July 11 2012 with a duration of ~115s and fluence of 2.8x10^-4 erg cm^-2 in the 20 keV-8 MeV energy range. GRB 120711A was at z~1.405 and produced soft gamma-ray emission (>20 keV) for at least ~10 ks after the trigger. The GRB was observed by several ground-based telescopes that detected a powerful optical flash peaking at an R-band brightness of ~11.5 mag at ~126 s after the trigger. We present a comprehensive temporal and spectral analysis of the long-lasting soft gamma-ray emission detected in the 20-200 keV band with INTEGRAL, the Fermi/LAT post-GRB detection above 100 MeV, the soft X-ray afterglow from XMM-Newton, Chandra, and Swift and the optical/NIR detections from Watcher, Skynet, GROND, and REM. We modelled the long-lasting soft gamma-ray emission using the standard afterglow scenario, which indicates a forward shock origin. The combination of data extending from the NIR to GeV energies suggest that the emission is produced by a broken power-law spectrum consistent with synchrotron radiation. The afterglow is well modelled using a stratified wind-like environment with a density profile k~1.2, suggesting a massive star progenitor (i.e. Wolf-Rayet). The analysis of the reverse and forward shock emission reveals an initial Lorentz factor of ~120-340, a jet half-opening angle of ~2deg-5deg, and a baryon load of ~10^-5-10^-6 Msun consistent with the expectations of the fireball model when the emission is highly relativistic. Long-lasting soft gamma-ray emission from other INTEGRAL GRBs with high peak fluxes, such as GRB 041219A, was not detected, suggesting that a combination of high Lorentz factor, emission above 100 MeV, and possibly a powerful reverse shock are required. Similar long-lasting soft gamma-ray emission has recently been observed from the nearby and extremely bright Fermi/LAT burst GRB 130427A.
  • We report results from a 1 week multi-wavelength campaign to monitor the BL Lac object S5 0716+714 (on December 9-16, 2009). In the radio bands the source shows rapid (~ (0.5-1.5) day) intra-day variability with peak amplitudes of up to ~ 10 %. The variability at 2.8 cm leads by about 1 day the variability at 6 cm and 11 cm. This time lag and more rapid variations suggests an intrinsic contribution to the source's intraday variability at 2.8 cm, while at 6 cm and 11 cm interstellar scintillation (ISS) seems to predominate. Large and quasi-sinusoidal variations of ~ 0.8 mag were detected in the V, R and I-bands. The X-ray data (0.2-10 keV) do not reveal significant variability on a 4 day time scale, favoring reprocessed inverse-Compton over synchrotron radiation in this band. The characteristic variability time scales in radio and optical bands are similar. A quasi-periodic variation (QPO) of 0.9 - 1.1 days in the optical data may be present, but if so it is marginal and limited to 2.2 cycles. Cross-correlations between radio and optical are discussed. The lack of a strong radio-optical correlation indicates different physical causes of variability (ISS at long radio wavelengths, source intrinsic origin in the optical), and is consistent with a high jet opacity and a compact synchrotron component peaking at ~= 100 GHz in an ongoing very prominent flux density outburst. For the campaign period, we construct a quasi-simultaneous spectral energy distribution (SED), including gamma-ray data from the FERMI satellite. We obtain lower limits for the relativistic Doppler-boosting of delta >= 12-26, which for a BL\,Lac type object, is remarkably high.
  • We propose to perform a continuously scanning all-sky survey from 200 keV to 80 MeV achieving a sensitivity which is better by a factor of 40 or more compared to the previous missions in this energy range. The Gamma-Ray Imaging, Polarimetry and Spectroscopy (GRIPS) mission addresses fundamental questions in ESA's Cosmic Vision plan. Among the major themes of the strategic plan, GRIPS has its focus on the evolving, violent Universe, exploring a unique energy window. We propose to investigate $\gamma$-ray bursts and blazars, the mechanisms behind supernova explosions, nucleosynthesis and spallation, the enigmatic origin of positrons in our Galaxy, and the nature of radiation processes and particle acceleration in extreme cosmic sources including pulsars and magnetars. The natural energy scale for these non-thermal processes is of the order of MeV. Although they can be partially and indirectly studied using other methods, only the proposed GRIPS measurements will provide direct access to their primary photons. GRIPS will be a driver for the study of transient sources in the era of neutrino and gravitational wave observatories such as IceCUBE and LISA, establishing a new type of diagnostics in relativistic and nuclear astrophysics. This will support extrapolations to investigate star formation, galaxy evolution, and black hole formation at high redshifts.
  • F. D'Ammando, C. M. Raiteri, M. Villata, P. Romano, G. Pucella, H. A. Krimm, S. Covino, M. Orienti, G. Giovannini, S. Vercellone, E. Pian, I. Donnarumma, V. Vittorini, M. Tavani, A. Argan, G. Barbiellini, F. Boffelli, A. Bulgarelli, P. Caraveo, P. W. Cattaneo, A. W. Chen, V. Cocco, E. Costa, E. Del Monte, G. De Paris, G. Di Cocco, Y. Evangelista, M. Feroci, A. Ferrari, M. Fiorini, T. Froysland, M. Frutti, F. Fuschino, M. Galli, F. Gianotti, A. Giuliani, C. Labanti, I. Lapshov, F. Lazzarotto, P. Lipari, F. Longo, M. Marisaldi, S. Mereghetti, A. Morselli, L. Pacciani, A. Pellizzoni, F. Perotti, G. Piano, P. Picozza, M. Pilia, G. Porrovecchio, M. Prest, M. Rapisarda, A. Rappoldi, A. Rubini, S. Sabatini, P. Soffitta, E. Striani, M. Trifoglio, A. Trois, E. Vallazza, A. Zambra, D. Zanello, I. Agudo, H.D. Aller, M. F. Aller, A. A. Arkharov, U. Bach, E. Benitez, A. Berdyugin, D. A. Blinov, C. S. Buemi, W. P. Chen, A. Di Paola, M. Dolci, E. Forne, L. Fuhrmann, J. L. Gomez, M. A. Gurwell, B. Jordan, S. G. Jorstad, J. Heidt, D. Hiriart, T. Hovatta, H. Y. Hsiao, G. Kimeridze, T. S. Konstantinova, E. N. Kopatskaya, E. Koptelova, O. M. Kurtanidze, S. O. Kurtanidze, V. M. Larionov, A. Lahteenmaki, P. Leto, E. Lindfors, A. P. Marscher, B. McBreen, I. M. McHardy, D. A. Morozova, K. Nilsson, M. Pasanen, M. Roca-Sogorb, A. Sillanpaa, L. O. Takalo, M. Tornikoski, C. Trigilio, I. S. Troitsky, G. Umana, L. A. Antonelli, S. Colafrancesco, C. Pittori, P. Santolamazza, F. Verrecchia, P. Giommi, L. Salotti
    March 18, 2011 astro-ph.HE
    We report on the extreme gamma-ray activity from the FSRQ PKS 1510-089 observed by AGILE in March 2009. In the same period a radio-to-optical monitoring of the source was provided by the GASP-WEBT and REM. Moreover, several Swift ToO observations were triggered, adding important information on the source behaviour from optical/UV to hard X-rays. We paid particular attention to the calibration of the Swift/UVOT data to make it suitable to the blazars spectra. Simultaneous observations from radio to gamma rays allowed us to study in detail the correlation among the emission variability at different frequencies and to investigate the mechanisms at work. In the period 9-30 March 2009, AGILE detected an average gamma-ray flux of (311+/-21)x10^-8 ph cm^-2 s^-1 for E>100 MeV, and a peak level of (702+/-131)x10^-8 ph cm^-2 s^-1 on daily integration. The gamma-ray activity occurred during a period of increasing activity from near-IR to UV, with a flaring episode detected on 26-27 March 2009, suggesting that a single mechanism is responsible for the flux enhancement observed from near-IR to UV. By contrast, Swift/XRT observations seem to show no clear correlation of the X-ray fluxes with the optical and gamma-ray ones. However, the X-ray observations show a harder photon index (1.3-1.6) with respect to most FSRQs and a hint of harder-when-brighter behaviour, indicating the possible presence of a second emission component at soft X-ray energies. Moreover, the broad band spectrum from radio-to-UV confirmed the evidence of thermal features in the optical/UV spectrum of PKS 1510-089 also during high gamma-ray state. On the other hand, during 25-26 March 2009 a flat spectrum in the optical/UV energy band was observed, suggesting an important contribution of the synchrotron emission in this part of the spectrum during the brightest gamma-ray flare, therefore a significant shift of the synchrotron peak.
  • Aimed at understanding the evolution of galaxies in clusters, the GLACE survey is mapping a set of optical lines ([OII]3727, [OIII]5007, Hbeta and Halpha/[NII] when possible) in several galaxy clusters at redshift around 0.40, 0.63 and 0.86, using the Tuneable Filters (TF) of the OSIRIS instrument (Cepa et al. 2005) at the 10.4m GTC telescope. This study will address key questions about the physical processes acting upon the infalling galaxies during the course of hierarchical growth of clusters. GLACE is already ongoing: we present some preliminary results on our observations of the galaxy cluster Cl0024+1654 at z = 0.395; on the other hand, GLACE@0.86 has been approved as ESO/GTC large project to be started in 2011.
  • It is now more than 40 years since the discovery of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and in the last two decades there has been major progress in the observations of bursts, the afterglows and their host galaxies. This recent progress has been fueled by the ability of gamma-ray telescopes to quickly localise GRBs and the rapid follow-up observations with multi-wavelength instruments in space and on the ground. A total of 674 GRBs have been localised to date using the coded aperture masks of the four gamma-ray missions, BeppoSAX, HETE II, INTEGRAL and Swift. As a result there are now high quality observations of more than 100 GRBs, including afterglows and host galaxies, revealing the richness and progress in this field. The observations of GRBs cover more than 20 orders of magnitude in energy, from 10^-5 eV to 10^15 eV and also in two non-electromagnetic channels, neutrinos and gravitational waves. However the continuation of progress relies on space based instruments to detect and rapidly localise GRBs and distribute the coordinates.
  • INTEGRAL has two sensitive gamma-ray instruments that have detected 46 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) up to July 2007. We present the spectral, spatial, and temporal properties of the bursts in the INTEGRAL GRB catalogue using data from the imager, IBIS, and spectrometer, SPI. Spectral properties of the GRBs are determined using power-law, Band model and quasithermal model fits to the prompt emission. Spectral lags, i.e. the time delay in the arrival of low-energy gamma-rays with respect to high-energy gamma-rays, are measured for 31 of the GRBs. The photon index distribution of power-law fits to the prompt emission spectra is consistent with that obtained by Swift. The peak flux distribution shows that INTEGRAL detects proportionally more weak GRBs than Swift because of its higher sensitivity in a smaller field of view. The all-sky rate of GRBs above ~0.15 ph cm^-2 s^-1 is ~1400 yr^-1 in the fully coded field of view of IBIS. Two groups are identified in the spectral lag distribution, one with short lags <0.75 s (between 25-50 keV and 50-300 keV) and one with long lags >0.75 s. Most of the long-lag GRBs are inferred to have low redshifts because of their long spectral lags, their tendency to have low peak energies and their faint optical and X-ray afterglows. They are mainly observed in the direction of the supergalactic plane with a quadrupole moment of Q=-0.225+/-0.090 and hence reflect the local large-scale structure of the Universe. The rate of long-lag GRBs with inferred low luminosity is ~25% of Type Ib/c supernovae. Some of these bursts could be produced by the collapse of a massive star without a supernova or by a different progenitor, such as the merger of two white dwarfs or a white dwarf with a neutron star or black hole, possibly in the cluster environment without a host galaxy.
  • The massive cluster of galaxies Abell 2219 (z = 0.228) was observed at 14.3 $\mu$m with the Infrared Space Observatory and results were published by Barvainis et al. (1999). These observations have been reanalyzed using a method specifically designed for the detection of faint sources that had been applied to other clusters. Five new sources were detected and the resulting cumulative total of ten sources all have optical counterparts. The mid-infrared sources are identified with three cluster members, three foreground galaxies, an Extremely Red Object, a star and two galaxies of unknown redshift. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the galaxies are fit with models from a selection, using the program GRASIL. Best-fits are obtained, in general, with models of galaxies with ongoing star formation. For three cluster members the infrared luminosities derived from the model SEDs are between ~5.7x10^10 Lsun and 1.4x10^11 Lsun, corresponding to infrared star formation rates between 10 and 24 Msun yr^-1. The two cluster galaxies that have optical classifications are in the Butcher-Oemler region of the color-magnitude diagramme. The three foreground galaxies have infrared luminosities between 1.5x10^10 Lsun and 9.4x10^10 Lsun yielding infrared star formation rates between 3 and 16 Msun yr^-1. Two of the foreground galaxies are located in two foreground galaxy enhancements (Boschin et al. 2004). Including Abell 2219, six distant clusters of galaxies have been mapped with ISOCAM and luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) have been found in three of them. The presence of LIRGs in Abell 2219 strengthens the association between luminous infrared galaxies in clusters and recent or ongoing cluster merger activity.
  • Observations of the core of the massive cluster Cl 0024+1654, at a redshift z=0.39, were obtained with the Infrared Space Observatory using ISOCAM at 6.7 mum and 14.3 mum (hereafter 15 mum). Thirty five sources were detected at 15 mum and thirteen of them are spectroscopically identified with cluster galaxies. The remaining sources consist of four stars, one quasar, one foreground galaxy, three background galaxies and thirteen sources with unknown redshift. The ISOCAM sources have best-fit SEDs typical of spiral or starburst models observed 1 Gyr after the main starburst event. The median infrared luminosity of the twelve cluster galaxies is 1.0x10^11 Lsun, with 10 having infrared luminosity above 9x10^10 Lsun, and so lying near or above the 1x10^11 Lsun threshold for identification as a luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG). The [OII] star formation rates obtained for 3 cluster galaxies are one to two orders of magnitude lower than the infrared values, implying that most of the star formation is missed in the optical because it is enshrouded by dust in the starburst galaxy. The counterparts of about half of the 15 mum cluster sources are blue, luminous, star-forming systems and the type of galaxy that is usually associated with the Butcher-Oemler effect. Dust obscuration may be a major cause of the 15 mum sources appearing on the cluster main sequence. The majority of the ISOCAM sources in the Butcher-Oemler region of the colour-magnitude diagram are best fit by spiral-type SEDs whereas post-starburst models are preferred on the main sequence, with the starburst event probably triggered by interaction with one or more galaxies. Finally, the mid-infrared results on Cl 0024+1654 are compared with four other clusters observed with ISOCAM.
  • GRB041219a is the brightest burst localised by INTEGRAL. The intense burst occurred about ~250s after the precursor and the long delay enabled optical and near infrared telescopes to observe the prompt emission. We present comprehensive results of the temporal and spectral analyses, including line and afterglow searches using the spectrometer, SPI, aboard INTEGRAL, BAT on Swift and ASM on RXTE. We avail of multi-wavelength data to generate broadband spectra of GRB041219a and afterglow. Spectra for the burst and sub-intervals were fit by the Band model and also by the quasithermal model. The high resolution Germanium spectrometer data were searched for emission and absorption features and for gamma-ray afterglow. The overall burst and sub-intervals are well fit by the Band model. The photon index below the break energy shows a marked change after the quiescent time interval. In addition the spectra are well described by a black body component with a power law. The burst was detected by BAT and ASM during the long quiescent interval in SPI indicating the central engine might not be dormant but that the emission occurs in different bands. No significant emission or absorption features were found and limits of 900 eV and 120 eV are set on the most significant features. No gamma-ray afterglow was detected from the end of the prompt phase to ~12 hours post-burst. Broadband spectra of the prompt emission were generated in 7 time intervals using gamma-ray, x-ray, optical and near-infrared data and these were compared to the high-redshift burst GRB050904. The optical and gamma-ray emission are correlated in GRB041219a. The spectral lag was determined using data from the BAT and it changes throughout the burst. A number of pseudo-redshifts were evaluated and large dispersion in values was found.
  • Understanding the reasons for the faintness of the optical/near-infrared afterglows of the so-called dark bursts is essential to assess whether they form a subclass of GRBs, and hence for the use of GRBs in cosmology. With VLT and other ground-based telescopes, we searched for the afterglows of the INTEGRAL bursts GRB 040223, GRB 040422 and GRB 040624 in the first hours after the triggers. A detection of a faint afterglow and of the host galaxy in the K band was achieved for GRB 040422, while only upper limits were obtained for GRB 040223 and GRB 040624, although in the former case the X-ray afterglow was observed. A comparison with the magnitudes of a sample of afterglows clearly shows the faintness of these bursts, which are good examples of a population that an increasing usage of large diameter telescopes is beginning to unveil.
  • We report here gamma-ray, X-ray and near-infrared observations of GRB040223 along with gamma-ray and optical observations of GRB040624. GRB040223 was detected by INTEGRAL close to the Galactic plane and GRB040624 at high Galactic latitude. Analyses of the prompt emission detected by the IBIS instrument on INTEGRAL are presented for both bursts. The two GRBs have long durations, slow pulses and are weak. The gamma-ray spectra of both bursts are best fit with steep power-laws, implying they are X-ray rich. GRB040223 is among the weakest and longest of INTEGRAL GRBs. The X-ray afterglow of this burst was detected 10 hours after the prompt event by XMM-Newton. The measured spectral properties are consistent with a column density much higher than that expected from the Galaxy, indicating strong intrinsic absorption. We carried out near-infrared observations 17 hours after the burst with the NTT of ESO, which yielded upper limits. Given the intrinsic absorption, we find that these limits are compatible with a simple extrapolation of the X-ray afterglow properties. For GRB040624, we carried out optical observations 13 hours after the burst with FORS 1 and 2 at the VLT, and DOLoRes at the TNG, again obtaining upper limits. We compare these limits with the magnitudes of a compilation of promptly observed counterparts of previous GRBs and show that they lie at the very faint end of the distribution. These two bursts are good examples of a population of bursts with dark or faint afterglows that are being unveiled through the increasing usage of large diameter telescopes engaged in comprehensive observational programmes.
  • Observations of four WR galaxies (NGC 5430, NGC 6764, Mrk 309 and VII Zw 19) using the Infrared Space Observatory are presented here. ISOCAM maps of NGC 5430, Mrk 309 and NGC 6764 revealed the location of star formation regions in each of these galaxies. ISOPHOT spectral observations from 4 to 12 microns detected the ubiquitous PAH bands in the nuclei of the targets and several of the disk star forming regions, while LWS spectroscopy detected [OI] and [CII] emission lines from two galaxies, NGC 5430 and NGC 6764. Using a combination of ISO and IRAS flux densities, a dust model based on the sum of modified blackbody components was successfully fitted to the available data. These models were then used to calculate new values for the total IR luminosities for each galaxy, the size of the various dust populations, and the global SFR. The derived flux ratios, the SFRs, the high L(PAH)/L(40-120 microns) and F(PAH 7.7 microns)/F(7.7 microns continuum) values suggest that most of these galaxies are home to only a compact burst of star formation. The exception is NGC 6764, whose F(PAH 7.7 microns)/F(7.7 microns continuum) value of 1.22 is consistent with the presence of an AGN, yet the L(PAH)/L(40-120 microns) is more in line with a starburst, a finding in line with a compact low-luminosity AGN dominated by the starburst.
  • GRB 040422 was detected by the INTEGRAL satellite at an angle of only 3 degrees from the Galactic plane. Analysis of the prompt emission observed with the SPI and IBIS instruments on INTEGRAL are presented. The IBIS spectrum is well fit by the Band model with a break energy of Eo=56+/-2 keV and Epeak=41+/-3 keV. The peak flux is 1.8 10^(-7) erg/cm2/s and fluence 3.4 10^(-7) erg/cm2 in the range 20-200 keV. We then present the observations of the afterglow of GRB 040422, obtained with the ISAAC and FORS 2 instruments at the VLT less than 2 hours after the burst. We report the discovery of its near-infrared afterglow, for which we give here the astrometry and photometry. No detection could have been obtained in the R and I bands, partly due to the large extinction in the Milky Way. We re-imaged the position of the afterglow two months later in the Ks band, and detected a likely bright host galaxy. We compare the magnitude of the afterglow with a those of a compilation of promptly observed counterparts of previous GRBs, and show that the afterglow of GRB 040422 lies at the very faint end of the distribution, brighter only than that of GRB 021211, singled out later and in the optical bands, and GRB 040924 after accounting for Milky Way extinction. This observation suggests that the proportion of dark GRBs can be significantly lowered by a more systematic use of 8-m class telescopes in the infrared in the very early hours after the burst.
  • Lightning in the solar nebula is considered to be one of the probable sources for producing the chondrules that are found in meteorites. Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) provide a large flux of gamma-rays that Compton scatter and create a charge separation in the gas because the electrons are displaced from the positive ions. The electric field easily exceeds the breakdown value of ~1 V m^-1 over distances of order 0.1 AU. The energy in a giant lightning discharge exceeds a terrestrial lightning flash by a factor of ~10^12. The predicted post-burst emission of gamma-rays from accretion into the newly formed black hole or spin-down of the magnetar is sufficiently intense to cause a lightning storm in the nebula that lasts for days and is more probable than the GRB because the radiation is beamed into a larger solid angle. The giant outbursts from nearby soft gamma-ray repeater sources (SGRs) are also capable of causing giant lightning discharges. The total amount of chondrules produced is in reasonable agreement with the observations of meteorites. Furthermore in the case of GRBs most chondrules were produced in a few major melting events by nearby GRBs and lightning occurred at effectively the same time over the whole nebula, and provide accurate time markers to the formation of chondrules and evolution of the solar nebula. This model provides a reasonable explanation for the delay between the formation of calcium aluminium inclusions (CAIs) and chondrules.
  • On January 6th 2004, the IBAS burst alert system triggered the 8th gamma-ray burst (GRB) to be located by the INTEGRAL satellite. The position was determined and publicly distributed within 12s, prompting ESA's XMM-Newton to execute a ToO observation just 5 hours later, during which an X-ray afterglow was detected. The GRB had a duration ~52s with two distinct pulses separated by \~42s. Here we present the results of imaging and spectral analyses of the prompt emission from INTEGRAL data and the X-ray afterglow from XMM-Newton data. The gamma-ray spectrum is consistent with a single power-law of photon index -1.72 +/- 0.15. The fluence (20-200 keV) was 8.2 x 10^-7 erg cm^-2. The X-ray afterglow (F_nu (t) propto nu^-beta_X t^-delta) was extremely hard with beta_X = 0.47 +/- 0.01 and delta = 1.46 +/- 0.04. The 2-10 keV flux 11 hours after the burst was 1.1 x 10^-12 erg cm^-2 s^-1. The time profile of the GRB is consistent with the observed trends from previous analysis of BATSE GRBs. We find that the X-ray data are not well-fit by either a simple spherical fireball or by a speading jet, expanding into a homogeneous medium or a wind environment. Based on previously determined correlations between GRB spectra and redshift, we estimate a redshift of ~0.9^+0.5_-0.4 (1 sigma) and a lower limit on the isotropic radiated energy of ~5 x 10^51 erg in this burst.
  • We have designed a medium deep large area X-ray survey with XMM - the XMM Large Scale Structure survey, XMM-LSS - with the scope of extending the cosmological tests attempted using ROSAT cluster samples to two redshift bins between 0<z<1 while maintaining the precision of earlier studies. Two main goals have constrained the survey design: the evolutionary study of the cluster-cluster correlation function and of the cluster number density. The results are promising and, so far, in accordance with our predictions as to the survey sensitivity and cluster number density. The feasibility of the programme is demonstrated and further X-ray coverage is awaited in order to proceed with a truly significant statistical analysis. (Abridged)
  • Chondrules are millimeter sized objects of spherical to irregular shape that constitute the major component of chondritic meteorites that originate in the region between Mars and Jupiter and which fall to Earth. They appear to have solidified rapidly from molten or partially molten drops. The heat source that melted the chondrules remains uncertain. The intense radiation from a gamma-ray burst (GRB) is capable of melting material at distances up to 300 light years. These conditions were created in the laboratory for the first time when millimeter sized pellets were placed in a vacuum chamber in the white synchrotron beam at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The pellets were rapidly heated in the X-ray and gamma-ray furnace to above 1400C melted and cooled. This process heats from the inside unlike normal furnaces. The melted spherical samples were examined with a range of techniques and found to have microstructural properties similar to the chondrules that come from meteorites. This experiment demonstrates that GRBs can melt precursor material to form chondrules that may subsequently influence the formation of planets. This work extends the field of laboratory astrophysics to include high power synchrotron sources.
  • We observed the cluster Abell 2218 (z=0.175), with ISOCAM on board the Infrared Space Observatory, using two filters with reference wavelengths of 6.7 and 14.3 microns. We detected 67 extragalactic mid-infrared sources. Using the ``GRASIL'' models of Silva et al. (1998) we have obtained acceptable and well constrained fits to the observed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 41 of these sources, for which additional optical/near-infrared magnitudes, and, in some cases, redshifts, were available. We have then determined the total infrared luminosities and star formation rates (SFRs) of these 41 sources, of which 27 are cluster members and 14 are field galaxies at a median redshift z~0.6. The SEDs of most of the ISOCAM cluster members are best fit by models with negligible star formation in the last ~1 Gyr. The 7 faintest cluster members have a slightly higher, but still very mild, star-formation activity. The ISOCAM-selected cluster galaxies appear to be an unbiased subsample of the overall cluster population. If A2218 is undergoing a merger, as suggested by some optical and X-ray analyses, then this merger does not seem to affect the mid-infrared properties of its galaxies. The SEDs of most ISOCAM-selected field sources are best fit by models with significant ongoing (and recent) star formation, resembling those of massive star-forming spirals or (post)starburst galaxies. Their median SFR is 22 solar masses per year. Eight of the 14 field sources are Luminous IR Galaxies. (Abridged)
  • On January 6th 2004, the IBAS burst alert system triggered the 8th gamma-ray burst (GRB) to be detected by the INTEGRAL satellite. The position was determined and publicly distributed within 12s, enabling ESA's XMM-Newton to take advantage of a ToO observation just 5 hours later during which the x-ray afterglow was detected. Observations at optical wavelengths also revealed the existence of a fading optical source. The GRB is ~52s long with 2 distinct peaks separated by ~24s. At gamma-ray energies the burst was the weakest detected by INTEGRAL up to that time with a flux in the 20-200 keV band of 0.57 photons/cm^2/s. Nevertheless, it was possible to determine its position and extract spectra and fluxes. Here we present light curves and the results of imaging, spectral and temporal analyses of the prompt emission and the onset of the afterglow from INTEGRAL data.
  • The spectrometer SPI on board INTEGRAL is capable of high-resolution spectroscopic studies in the energy range 20keV to 8MeV for GRBs which occur within the fully coded field of view (16 degrees corner to corner). Six GRBs occurred within the SPI field of view between October 2002 and November 2003. We present results of the analysis of the first two GRBs detected by SPI after the payload performance and verification phase of INTEGRAL.
  • Magnetars are modelled as sources that derive their output from magnetic energy that substantially exceeds their rotational energy. An implication of the recent polarization measurement of GRB 021206 is that the emission mechanism may be dominated by a magnetic field that originates in the central engine. Similarities in the temporal properties of SGRs and GRBs are considered in light of the fact that the central engine in GRBs may be magnetically dominated. The results show that 1) the time intervals between outbursts in SRG 1806-20 and pulses in GRBs are consistent with lognormal distributions and 2) the cumulative outputs of SGRs and GRBs increase linearly with time. This behaviour can be successfully modelled by a relaxation system that maintains a steady state situation.
  • The spectrometer SPI, one of the two main instruments of the INTEGRAL spacecraft, offers significant gamma-ray burst detection capabilities. In its 35 deg (full width) field of view SPI is able to localise gamma-ray bursts at a mean rate of ~ 0.8/month. With its large anticoincidence shield of 512 kg of BGO crystals SPI is able to detect gamma-ray bursts quasi omni-directionally with a very high sensitivity. Burst alerts of the anticoincidence shield are distributed by the INTEGRAL Burst Alert System. In the first 8 months of the mission about 0.8/day gamma-ray burst candidates and 0.3/day gamma-ray burst positions were obtained with the anticoincidence shield by interplanetary network triangulations with other spacecrafts.
  • The cumulative light curves of a large sample of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) were obtained by summing the BATSE counts. The smoothed profiles are much simpler than the complex and erratic running light curves that are normally used. For most GRBs the slope of the cumulative light curve (S) is approximately constant over a large fraction of the burst. The bursts are modelled as relaxation systems that continuously accumulate energy in the reservoir and discontinuously release it. The slope is a measure of the cumulative power output of the central engine. A plot of S versus peak flux in 64ms (P64ms) shows a very good correlation over a wide range for both short and long GRBs. No relationship was found between S and GRBs with known redshift. The standard slope (S'), which is representative of the power output per unit time, is correlated separately with P64ms for both sub-classes indicating more powerful outbursts for the short GRBs. S' is also anticorrelated with GRB duration. These results imply that GRBs are powered by accretion into a black hole.
  • The cumulative light curves of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) smooth the spiky nature of the running light curve. The cumulative count increases in an approximately linear way with time t for most bursts. In 19 out of 398 GRBs with T90 > 2s, the cumulative light curve was found to increase with time as \~t^2 implying a linear increase in the running light curve. The non-linear sections last for a substantial fraction of the GRB duration, have a large proportion of the cumulative count and many resolved pulses that usually end with the highest pulse in the burst. The reverse behaviour was found in 11 GRBs where the running light curve decreased with time and some bursts are good mirror images of the increases. These GRBs are among the spectrally hardest bursts observed by BATSE. The most likely interpretation is that these effects are signatures of black holes that are either being spun up or down in the accretion process. In the spin up case, the increasing Kerr parameter of the black hole allows additional rotational and accretion energy to become available for extraction. The process is reversed if the black hole is spun down by magnetic field torques. The luminosity changes in GRBs are consistent with the predictions of the BZ process and neutrino annihilation and thus provide the link to spinning black holes. GRBs provide a new window for studying the general relativistic effects of Kerr black holes.