• In experiments and numerical simulations we measured angles between the symmetry axes of small spheroids advected in turbulence ("passive directors"). Since turbulent strains tend to align nearby spheroids, one might think that their relative angles are quite small. We show that this intuition fails in general because angles between the symmetry axes of nearby particles are anomalously large. We identify two mechanisms that cause this phenomenon. First, the dynamics evolves to a fractal attractor despite the fact that the fluid velocity is spatially smooth at small scales. Second, this fractal forms steps akin to scar lines observed in the director patterns for random or chaotic two-dimensional maps.
  • We analyze the angular dynamics of triaxial ellipsoids in a shear flow subject to weak thermal noise. By numerically integrating an overdamped angular Langevin equation, we find the steady angular probability distribution for a range of triaxial particle shapes. From this distribution we compute the intrinsic viscosity of a dilute suspension of triaxial particles. We determine how the viscosity depends on particle shape in the limit of weak thermal noise. While the deterministic angular dynamics depends very sensitively on particle shape, we find that the shape dependence of the intrinsic viscosity is weaker, in general, and that suspensions of rod-like particles are the most sensitive to breaking of axisymmetry. The intrinsic viscosity of a dilute suspension of triaxial particles is smaller than that of a suspension of axisymmetric particles with the same volume, and the same ratio of major to minor axis lengths.
  • In genome mapping experiments, long DNA molecules are stretched by confining them to very narrow channels, so that the locations of sequence-specific fluorescent labels along the channel axis provide large-scale genomic information. It is difficult, however, to make the channels narrow enough so that the DNA molecule is fully stretched. In practice its conformations may form hairpins that change the spacings between internal segments of the DNA molecule, and thus the label locations along the channel axis. Here we describe a theory for the distribution of label spacings that explains the heavy tails observed in distributions of label spacings in genome mapping experiments.
  • We investigate the effect of turbulence on the collisional growth of um-sized droplets by high-resolution numerical simulations with well resolved Kolmogorov scales, assuming a collision and coalescence efficiency of unity. The droplet dynamics and collisions are approximated using a superparticle approach. We show that the time evolution of the shape of the droplet-size distribution due to turbulence-induced collision depends strongly on the turbulent energy-dissipation rate, but only weakly on the Reynolds number. The size distribution exhibits power law behavior with a slope of -3.7 in the size range of about 10-40 um, which is close to the power law size distribution found for interstellar dust grains. When gravity is invoked, the strong dependency becomes weakened. Turbulence is found to dominate the time evolution of an initially monodisperse droplet distribution at early times. At later times, however, gravity takes over and dominates the collisional growth. With combined turbulence and gravity, the time scale to reach drizzle sized droplets is about 900 s, which is close to the time scale of rapid warm rain formation. The collision rate grows exponentially, which is consistent with the theoretical prediction of the continuous collisional growth even when the turbulence-generated collision is invoked.
  • We compute the drag force on a sphere settling slowly in a quiescent, linearly stratified fluid. Stratification can significantly enhance the drag experienced by the settling particle. The magnitude of this effect depends on whether fluid-density transport around the settling particle is due to diffusion, to advection by the disturbance flow caused by the particle, or due to both. It therefore matters how efficiently the fluid disturbance is convected away from the particle by fluid-inertial terms. When these terms dominate, the Oseen drag force must be recovered. We compute by perturbation theory how the Oseen drag is modified by diffusion and stratification. Our results are in good agreement with recent direct-numerical simulation studies of the problem at small Reynolds numbers and large (but not too large) Froude numbers.
  • If a semiflexible polymer confined to a narrow channel bends around by 180 degrees, the polymer is said to exhibit a hairpin. The equilibrium extension statistics of the confined polymer are well understood when hairpins are vanishingly rare or when they are plentiful. Here we analyze the extension statistics in the intermediate situation via experiments with DNA coated by the protein RecA, which enhances the stiffness of the DNA molecule by approximately one order of magnitude. We find that the extension distribution is highly non-Gaussian, in good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations of confined discrete wormlike chains. We develop a simple model that qualitatively explains the form of the extension distribution. The model shows that the tail of the distribution at short extensions is determined by conformations with one hairpin.
  • We report on measurements of the angular dynamics of micron-sized equilaterally triangular platelets suspended in a micro-channel shear flow. Our measurements confirm that such particles spin and tumble like a spheroid in a simple shear. Since the triangle has corners we can observe the spinning directly. In general the spinning frequency is different from the tumbling frequency, and the spinning is affected by tumbling. This gives rise to doubly-periodic angular dynamics.
  • Experiments measuring DNA extension in nanochannels are at odds with even the most basic predictions of current scaling arguments for the conformations of confined semiflexible polymers such as DNA. We show that a theory based on a weakly self-avoiding, one-dimensional "telegraph" process collapses experimental data and simulation results onto a single master curve throughout the experimentally relevant region of parameter space and explains the mechanisms at play.
  • The orientation of small anisotropic particles settling in a turbulent fluid determines some essential properties of the suspension. We show that the orientation distribution of small heavy spheroids settling through turbulence can be accurately predicted by a simple Gaussian statistical model that takes into account particle inertia and provides a quantitative understanding of the orientation distribution on the problem parameters when fluid inertia is negligible. Our results open the way to a parameterisation of the distribution of ice-crystals in clouds, and potentially leads to an improved understanding of radiation reflection, or particle aggregation through collisions in clouds.
  • We investigate the distribution of relative velocities between small heavy particles of different sizes in turbulence by analysing a statistical model for bidisperse turbulent suspensions, containing particles with two different Stokes numbers. This number, ${\rm St}$, is a measure of particle inertia which in turn depends on particle size. When the Stokes numbers are similar, the distribution exhibits power-law tails, just as in the case of equal ${\rm St}$. The power-law exponent is a non-analytic function of the mean Stokes number $\overline{\rm St}$, so that the exponent cannot be calculated in perturbation theory around the advective limit. When the Stokes-number difference is larger, the power law disappears, but the tails of the distribution still dominate the relative-velocity moments, if $\overline{\rm St}$ is large enough.
  • In species reproducing both sexually and asexually clones are often more common in recently established populations. Earlier studies have suggested that this pattern arises from natural selection favouring asexual recruitment in young populations. Alternatively, as we show here, this pattern may result from stochastic processes during species-range expansions. We model a dioecious species expanding into a new area in which all individuals are capable of both sexual and asexual reproduction, and all individuals have equal survival rates and dispersal distances. Even under conditions that eventually favour sexual recruitment, colonisation starts with an asexual wave. Long after colonisation is completed, a sexual wave erodes clonal dominance. If individuals reproduce more than one season, and with only local dispersal, a few large clones typically dominate for thousands of reproductive seasons. Adding occasional long-distance dispersal, more dominant clones emerge, but they persist for a shorter period of time. The general mechanism involved is simple: edge effects at the expansion front favour asexual (uniparental) recruitment where potential mates are rare. Specifically, our stochastic model makes detailed predictions different from a selection model, and comparing these with empirical data from a postglacially established seaweed species (Fucus radicans) shows that in this case a stochastic mechanism is strongly supported.
  • We consider the dynamics of a small spherical particle driven through an unbounded viscoelastic shear flow by an external force. We give analytical solutions to both the mobility problem (velocity of forced particle) and the resistance problem (force on fixed particle), valid to second order in the dimensionless Deborah and Weissenberg numbers, which represent the elastic relaxation time of the fluid relative to the rate of translation and the imposed shear rate. We find a shear-induced lift at $O({\rm Wi})$, a modified drag at $O({\rm De}^2)$ and $O({\rm Wi}^2)$, and a second lift that is orthogonal to the first, at $O({\rm Wi}^2)$. The relative importance of these effects depends strongly on the orientation of the forcing relative to the shear. We discuss how these forces affect the terminal settling velocity in an inclined shear flow. We also describe a new basis set of symmetric Cartesian tensors, and demonstrate how they enable general tensorial perturbation calculations such as the present theory. In particular this scheme allows us to write down a solution to the inhomogenous Stokes equations, required by the perturbation expansion, by a sequence of algebraic manipulations well suited to computer implementation.
  • A new experimental technique for creating and imaging collisions of micron-sized droplets settling under gravity is presented. A pair of glycerol droplets is suspended in air by means of two optical traps. The droplet relative velocities are determined by the droplet sizes. The impact parameter is precisely controlled by positioning the droplets using the two optical traps. The droplets are released by turning off the trapping light using electro-optical modulators. The motion of the sedimenting droplets is then captured by two synchronized high-speed cameras, at a frame rate of up to 63 kHz. The method allows the direct imaging of the collision of droplets without the influence of the optical confinement imposed by the trapping force. The method will facilitate efficient studies of the microphysics of neutral, as well as charged, liquid droplets and their interactions with light, electric field and thermodynamic environment, such as temperature or vapor concentration.
  • The angular dynamics of a very small ellipsoidal particle in a viscous flow decouples from its translational dynamics, and the particle angular velocity is given by Jeffery's theory. It is known that cuboid particles share these properties. In the literature a special case is most frequently discussed, namely that of axisymmetric particles with a continuous rotation symmetry. Here we compute the angular dynamics of crystals that possess a discrete rotation symmetry and certain mirror symmetries, but that do not have a continuous rotation symmetry. We give examples of such particles that nevertheless obey Jeffery's theory. But there are other examples where the angular dynamics is determined by a more general equation of motion.
  • We compute the angular dynamics of a neutrally buoyant nearly spherical particle immersed in an unsteady fluid. We assume that the particle is small, that its translational slip velocity is negligible, and that unsteady and convective inertia are small perturbations. We derive an approximation for the torque on the particle that determines the first inertial corrections to Jeffery's equation. These corrections arise as a consequence of local vortex stretching, and can be substantial in turbulence where local vortex stretching is strong and closely linked to the irreversibility of turbulence.
  • The dynamics of heavy particles suspended in turbulent flows is of fundamental importance for a wide range of questions in astrophysics, atmospheric physics, oceanography, and technology. Laboratory experiments and numerical simulations have demonstrated that heavy particles respond in intricate ways to turbulent fluctuations of the carrying fluid: non-interacting particles may cluster together and form spatial patterns even though the fluid is incompressible, and the relative speeds of nearby particles can fluctuate strongly. Both phenomena depend sensitively on the parameters of the system. This parameter dependence is difficult to model from first principles since turbulence plays an essential role. Laboratory experiments are also very difficult, precisely since they must refer to a turbulent environment. But in recent years it has become clear that important aspects of the dynamics of heavy particles in turbulence can be understood in terms of statistical models where the turbulent fluctuations are approximated by Gaussian random functions with appropriate correlation functions. In this review we summarise how such statistical-model calculations have led to a detailed understanding of the factors that determine heavy-particle dynamics in turbulence. We concentrate on spatial clustering of heavy particles in turbulence. This is an important question because spatial clustering affects the collision rate between the particles and thus the long-term fate of the system.
  • We compute the hydrodynamic torque on a dumbbell (two spheres linked by a massless rigid rod) settling in a quiescent fluid at small but finite Reynolds number. The spheres have the same mass densities but different sizes. When the sizes are quite different the dumbbell settles vertically, aligned with the direction of gravity, the largest sphere first. But when the size difference is sufficiently small then its steady-state angle is determined by a competition between the size difference and the Reynolds number. When the sizes of the spheres are exactly equal then fluid inertia causes the dumbbell to settle in a horizontal orientation.
  • We analyse the angular velocity of a small neutrally buoyant spheroid log rolling in a simple shear. When the effect of fluid inertia is negligible the angular velocity $\omega$ equals half the fluid vorticity. We compute by singular perturbation theory how weak fluid inertia reduces the angular velocity in an unbounded shear, and how this reduction depends upon the shape of the spheroid (on its aspect ratio). In addition we determine the angular velocity by direct numerical simulations. The results are in excellent agreement with the theory at small but not too small values of the shear Reynolds number, for all aspect ratios considered. For the special case of a sphere we find $\omega/s = -1/2+0.0540\, \mbox{Re}_\mbox{s}^{3/2}$ where $s$ is the shear rate, and $\mbox{Re}_\mbox{s}$ is the shear Reynolds number. This result differs from that derived by Lin et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 44 (1970) 1] who obtained a numerical coefficient roughly three times larger.
  • The distribution of particle accelerations in turbulence is intermittent, with non-Gaussian tails that are quite different for light and heavy particles. In this article we analyse a closure scheme for the acceleration fluctuations of light and heavy inertial particles in turbulence, formulated in terms of Lagrangian correlation functions of fluid tracers. We compute the variance and the flatness of inertial particle accelerations and we discuss their dependency on the Stokes number. The closure incorporates effects induced by the Lagrangian correlations along the trajectories of fluid tracers, and its predictions agree well with results of direct numerical simulations of inertial particles in turbulence, provided that the effects induced by the inertial preferential sampling of heavy/light particles outside/inside vortices are negligible. In particular, the scheme predicts the correct functional behaviour of the acceleration variance, as a function of Stokes, as well as the presence of a minimum/maximum for the flatness of the acceleration of heavy/light particles, in good qualitative agreement with numerical data. We also show that the closure works well when applied to the Lagrangian evolution of particles using a stochastic surrogate for the underlying Eulerian velocity field. Our results support the conclusion that there exist important contributions to the statistics of the acceleration of inertial particles independent of the preferential sampling. For heavy particles we observe deviations between the predictions of the closure scheme and direct numerical simulations, at Stokes numbers of order unity. For light particles the deviation occurs for larger Stokes numbers.
  • Finding a quantitative description of the rate of collisions between small particles suspended in mixing flows is a long-standing problem. Here we investigate the validity of a parameterisation of the collision rate for identical particles subject to Stokes force, based on results for relative velocities of heavy particles that were recently obtained within a statistical model for the dynamics of turbulent aerosols. This model represents the turbulent velocity fluctuations by Gaussian random functions. We find that the parameterisation gives quantitatively good results in the limit where the \lq ghost-particle approximation' applies. The collision rate is a sum of two contributions due to \lq caustics' and to \lq clustering'. Within the statistical model we compare the relative importance of these two collision mechanisms. The caustic formation rate is high when the particle inertia becomes large, and we find that caustics dominate the collision rate as soon as they form frequently. We compare the magnitude of the caustic contribution to the collision rate to the formation rate of caustics.
  • Recent studies show that spherical motile micro-organisms in turbulence subject to gravitational torques gather in down-welling regions of the turbulent flow. By analysing a statistical model we analytically compute how shape affects the dynamics, preferential sampling, and small-scale spatial clustering. We find that oblong organisms may spend more time in up-welling regions of the flow, and that all organisms are biased to regions of positive fluid-velocity gradients in the upward direction. We analyse small-scale spatial clustering and find that oblong particles may either cluster more or less than spherical ones, depending on the strength of the gravitational torques.
  • Genome-wide patterns of genetic divergence reveal mechanisms of adaptation under gene flow. Empirical data show that divergence is mostly concentrated in narrow genomic regions. This pattern may arise because differentiated loci protect nearby mutations from gene flow, but recent theory suggests this mechanism is insufficient to explain the emergence of concentrated differentiation during biologically realistic timescales. Critically, earlier theory neglects an inevitable consequence of genetic drift: stochastic loss of local genomic divergence. Here we demonstrate that the rate of stochastic loss of weak local differentiation increases with recombination distance to a strongly diverged locus and, above a critical recombination distance, local loss is faster than local `gain' of new differentiation. Under high migration and weak selection this critical recombination distance is much smaller than the total recombination distance of the genomic region under selection. Consequently, divergence between populations increases by net gain of new differentiation within the critical recombination distance, resulting in tightly-linked clusters of divergence. The mechanism responsible is the balance between stochastic loss and gain of weak local differentiation, a mechanism acting universally throughout the genome. Our results will help to explain empirical observations and lead to novel predictions regarding changes in genomic architectures during adaptive divergence.
  • Studies of circular DNA confined to nanofluidic channels are relevant both from a fundamental polymer-physics perspective and due to the importance of circular DNA molecules in vivo. We here observe the unfolding of DNA from the circular to linear configuration as a light-induced double strand break occurs, characterize the dynamics, and compare the equilibrium conformational statistics of linear and circular configurations. This is important because it allows us to determine to which extent existing statistical theories describe the extension of confined circular DNA. We find that the ratio of the extensions of confined linear and circular DNA configurations increases as the buffer concentration decreases. The experimental results fall between theoretical predictions for the extended de Gennes regime at weaker confinement and the Odijk regime at stronger confinement. We show that it is possible to directly distinguish between circular and linear DNA molecules by measuring the emission intensity from the DNA. Finally, we determine the rate of unfolding and show that this rate is larger for more confined DNA, possibly reflecting the corresponding larger difference in entropy between the circular and linear configurations.
  • We numerically analyse the rotation of a neutrally buoyant spheroid in a shear flow at small shear Reynolds number. Using direct numerical stability analysis of the coupled nonlinear particle-flow problem we compute the linear stability of the log-rolling orbit at small shear Reynolds number, ${\rm Re}_a$. As ${\rm Re}_a \to 0$ and as the box size of the system tends to infinity we find good agreement between the numerical results and earlier analytical predictions valid to linear order in ${\rm Re}_a$ for the case of an unbounded shear. The numerical stability analysis indicates that there are substantial finite-size corrections to the analytical results obtained for the unbounded system. We also compare the analytical results to results of lattice-Boltzmann simulations to analyse the stability of the tumbling orbit at shear Reynolds numbers of order unity. Theory for an unbounded system at infinitesimal shear Reynolds number predicts a bifurcation of the tumbling orbit at aspect ratio $\lambda_{\rm c} \approx 0.137$ below which tumbling is stable (as well as log rolling). The simulation results show a bifurcation line in the $\lambda$-${\rm Re}_a$ plane that reaches $\lambda \approx0.1275$ at the smallest shear Reynolds number (${\rm Re}_a=1$) at which we could simulate with the lattice-Boltzmann code, in qualitative agreement with the analytical results.
  • We describe results of measurements of the orientational motion of glass microrods in a microchannel flow, following the orientational motion of particles with different shapes. We determine how the orientational dynamics depends on the shape of the particle and on its initial orientation. We find that the dynamics depends so sensitively on the degree to which particle axisymmetry is broken that it is difficult to find particles that are sufficiently axisymmetric so that they exhibit periodic tumbling ("Jeffery orbits"). The results of our measurements confirm earlier theoretical analysis predicting sensitive dependence on particle shape and its initial orientation. Our results illustrate the different types of orientational dynamics for asymmetric particles predicted by theory.