• We describe redMaPPer, a new red-sequence cluster finder specifically designed to make optimal use of ongoing and near-future large photometric surveys. The algorithm has multiple attractive features: (1) It can iteratively self-train the red-sequence model based on minimal spectroscopic training sample, an important feature for high redshift surveys; (2) It can handle complex masks with varying depth; (3) It produces cluster-appropriate random points to enable large-scale structure studies; (4) All clusters are assigned a full redshift probability distribution P(z); (5) Similarly, clusters can have multiple candidate central galaxies, each with corresponding centering probabilities; (6) The algorithm is parallel and numerically efficient: it can run a Dark Energy Survey-like catalog in ~500 CPU hours; (7) The algorithm exhibits excellent photometric redshift performance, the richness estimates are tightly correlated with external mass proxies, and the completeness and purity of the corresponding catalogs is superb. We apply the redMaPPer algorithm to ~10,000 deg^2 of SDSS DR8 data, and present the resulting catalog of ~25,000 clusters over the redshift range 0.08<z<0.55. The redMaPPer photometric redshifts are nearly Gaussian, with a scatter \sigma_z ~ 0.006 at z~0.1, increasing to \sigma_z~0.02 at z~0.5 due to increased photometric noise near the survey limit. The median value for |\Delta z|/(1+z) for the full sample is 0.006. The incidence of projection effects is low (<=5%). Detailed performance comparisons of the redMaPPer DR8 cluster catalog to X-ray and SZ catalogs are presented in a companion paper (Rozo & Rykoff 2014).
  • We report the discovery of a unique gravitational lens system, SDSSJ2222+2745, producing five spectroscopically confirmed images of a z_s=2.82 quasar lensed by a foreground galaxy cluster at z_l=0.49. We also present photometric and spectroscopic evidence for a sixth lensed image of the same quasar. The maximum separation between the quasar images is 15.1". Both the large image separations and the high image multiplicity of the lensed quasar are in themselves exceptionally rare, and observing the combination of these two factors is an exceptionally unlikely occurrence in present datasets. This is only the third known case of a quasar lensed by a cluster, and the only one with six images. The lens system was discovered in the course of the Sloan Giant Arcs Survey, in which we identify candidate lenses in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and target these for follow up and verification with the 2.56m Nordic Optical Telescope. Multi-band photometry obtained over multiple epochs from September 2011 to September 2012 reveal significant variability at the ~10-30% level in some of the quasar images, indicating that measurements of the relative time delay between quasar images will be feasible. In this lens system we also identify a bright (g = 21.5) giant arc corresponding to a strongly lensed background galaxy at z_s=2.30. We fit parametric models of the lens system, constrained by the redshift and positions of the quasar images and the redshift and position of the giant arc. The predicted time delays between different pairs of quasar images range from ~100 days to ~6 years.
  • Reducing the scatter between cluster mass and optical richness is a key goal for cluster cosmology from photometric catalogs. We consider various modifications to the red-sequence matched filter richness estimator of Rozo et al. (2009), and evaluate their impact on the scatter in X-ray luminosity at fixed richness. Most significantly, we find that deeper luminosity cuts can reduce the recovered scatter, finding that sigma_lnLX|lambda=0.63+/-0.02 for clusters with M_500c >~ 1.6e14 h_70^-1 M_sun. The corresponding scatter in mass at fixed richness is sigma_lnM|lambda ~ 0.2-0.3 depending on the richness, comparable to that for total X-ray luminosity. We find that including blue galaxies in the richness estimate increases the scatter, as does weighting galaxies by their optical luminosity. We further demonstrate that our richness estimator is very robust. Specifically, the filter employed when estimating richness can be calibrated directly from the data, without requiring a-priori calibrations of the red-sequence. We also demonstrate that the recovered richness is robust to up to 50% uncertainties in the galaxy background, as well as to the choice of photometric filter employed, so long as the filters span the 4000 A break of red-sequence galaxies. Consequently, our richness estimator can be used to compare richness estimates of different clusters, even if they do not share the same photometric data. Appendix 1 includes "easy-bake" instructions for implementing our optimal richness estimator, and we are releasing an implementation of the code that works with SDSS data, as well as an augmented maxBCG catalog with the lambda richness measured for each cluster.
  • SN 2008D was discovered while following up an unusually bright X-ray transient in the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 2770. We present early optical spectra (obtained 1.75 days after the X-ray transient) which allowed the first identification of the object as a supernova at redshift z = 0.007. These spectra were acquired during the initial declining phase of the light curve, likely produced in the stellar envelope cooling after shock breakout, and rarely observed. They exhibit a rather flat spectral energy distribution with broad undulations, and a strong, W-shaped feature with minima at 3980 and 4190 AA (rest frame). We also present extensive spectroscopy and photometry of the supernova during the subsequent photospheric phase. Unlike supernovae associated with gamma-ray bursts, SN 2008D displayed prominent He features and is therefore of Type Ib.
  • Determining the scaling relations between galaxy cluster observables requires large samples of uniformly observed clusters. We measure the mean X-ray luminosity--optical richness (L_X--N_200) relation for an approximately volume-limited sample of more than 17,000 optically-selected clusters from the maxBCG catalog spanning the redshift range 0.1<z<0.3. By stacking the X-ray emission from many clusters using ROSAT All-Sky Survey data, we are able to measure mean X-ray luminosities to ~10% (including systematic errors) for clusters in nine independent optical richness bins. In addition, we are able to crudely measure individual X-ray emission from ~800 of the richest clusters. Assuming a log-normal form for the scatter in the L_X--N_200 relation, we measure \sigma_\ln{L}=0.86+/-0.03 at fixed N_200. This scatter is large enough to significantly bias the mean stacked relation. The corrected median relation can be parameterized by L_X = (e^\alpha)(N_200/40)^\beta 10^42 h^-2 ergs/s, where \alpha = 3.57+/-0.08 and \beta = 1.82+/-0.05. We find that X-ray selected clusters are significantly brighter than optically-selected clusters at a given optical richness. This selection bias explains the apparently X-ray underluminous nature of optically-selected cluster catalogs.
  • The localization of the short-duration, hard-spectrum GRB 050509b was a watershed event. Thanks to the nearly immediate relay of the GRB position by Swift, we began imaging the GRB field 8 minutes after the burst and continued for the following 8 days. No convincing optical/infrared candidate afterglow or supernova was found for the object. We present a re-analysis of the XRT afterglow and find an absolute position that is ~4" to the west of the XRT position reported previously. Close to this position is a bright elliptical galaxy with redshift z=0.2248, about 1' from the center of a rich cluster of galaxies. Based on positional coincidences, the GRB and the bright elliptical are likely to be physically related. We thus have discovered evidence that at least some short-duration, hard-spectra GRBs arise at cosmological distances. However, while GRB 050509b was underluminous compared to long-duration GRBs, we demonstrate that the ratio of the blast-wave energy to the gamma-ray energy is consistent with that of long-duration GRBs. Based on this analysis, on the location of the GRB (40 +- 13 kpc from a bright galaxy), on the galaxy type (elliptical), and the lack of a coincident supernova, we suggest that there is now observational consistency with the hypothesis that short-hard bursts arise during the merger of a compact binary. We limit the properties of a Li-Paczynski ''mini-supernova.'' Other progenitor models are still viable, and additional rapidly localized bursts from the Swift mission will undoubtedly help to further clarify the progenitor picture. (abridged)