• During the summer of 2013, a 4-month spectroscopic campaign took place to observe the variabilities in three Wolf-Rayet stars. The spectroscopic data have been analyzed for WR 134 (WN6b), to better understand its behaviour and long-term periodicity, which we interpret as arising from corotating interaction regions (CIRs) in the wind. By analyzing the variability of the He II $\lambda$5411 emission line, the previously identified period was refined to P = 2.255 $\pm$ 0.008 (s.d.) days. The coherency time of the variability, which we associate with the lifetime of the CIRs in the wind, was deduced to be 40 $\pm$ 6 days, or $\sim$ 18 cycles, by cross-correlating the variability patterns as a function of time. When comparing the phased observational grayscale difference images with theoretical grayscales previously calculated from models including CIRs in an optically thin stellar wind, we find that two CIRs were likely present. A separation in longitude of $\Delta \phi \simeq$ 90$^{\circ}$ was determined between the two CIRs and we suggest that the different maximum velocities that they reach indicate that they emerge from different latitudes. We have also been able to detect observational signatures of the CIRs in other spectral lines (C IV $\lambda\lambda$5802,5812 and He I $\lambda$5876). Furthermore, a DAC was found to be present simultaneously with the CIR signatures detected in the He I $\lambda$5876 emission line which is consistent with the proposed geometry of the large-scale structures in the wind. Small-scale structures also show a presence in the wind, simultaneously with the larger scale structures, showing that they do in fact co-exist.
  • The results of a spectroscopic survey of epsilon Aurigae during eclipse using a network of small telescopes are presented. The spectra have a resolution of 0.35 to 0.65{\AA} and cover the period 2008 to 2012 with a typical interval of 4 days during eclipse. This paper specifically covers variations in the K I 7699{\AA}, Na D and Mg II 4481{\AA} lines. Absorption started increasing in the KI 7699{\AA} line 3 months before the eclipse began photometrically and had not returned to pre eclipse levels by the end of the survey March 2012, 7 months after the brightness had returned to normal outside eclipse levels. The contribution of the eclipsing object to the KI 7699{\AA} line has been isolated and the data show the excess absorption increasing and decreasing in a series of steps during ingress and egress. This is interpreted as an indication of structure within the eclipsing object. The F star is totally obscured by the eclipsing object at the Na D wavelength during eclipse. The radial velocity of the F star and the mean and maximum radial velocity of the eclipsing material in front of the F star at any given time have been isolated and tracked throughout the eclipse. The quasi-periodic variations seen in the F star RV outside eclipse continued during the eclipse. It is hoped that these results can be used to constrain proposed models of the system and its components.
  • The young O-type star theta1 OriC, the brightest star of the Trapezium cluster in Orion, is one of only two known magnetic rotators among the O stars. However, not all spectroscopic variations of this star can be explained by the magnetic rotator model. We present results from a long-term monitoring to study these unexplained variations and to improve the stellar rotational period. We want to study long-term trends of the radial velocity of theta1 OriC, to search for unusual changes, to improve the established rotational period and to check for possible period changes. We combine a large set of published spectroscopic data with new observations and analyze the spectra in a homogeneous way. We study the radial velocity from selected photo-spheric lines and determine the equivalent width of the Halpha and HeII4686 lines. We find evidence for a secular change of the radial velocity of theta1 OriC that is consistent with the published interferometric orbit. We refine the rotational period of theta1 OriC and discuss the possibility of detecting period changes in the near future.