• We analyze the star formation properties of 16 infrared-selected, spectroscopically confirmed galaxy clusters at $1 < z < 1.5$ from the Spitzer/IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS). We present new spectroscopic confirmation for six of these high-redshift clusters, five of which are at $z>1.35$. Using infrared luminosities measured with deep Spitzer/MIPS observations at 24 $\mu$m, along with robust optical+IRAC photometric redshifts and SED-fitted stellar masses, we present the dust-obscured star-forming fractions, star formation rates and specific star formation rates in these clusters as functions of redshift and projected clustercentric radius. We find that $z\sim 1.4$ represents a transition redshift for the ISCS sample, with clear evidence of an unquenched era of cluster star formation at earlier times. Beyond this redshift the fraction of star-forming cluster members increases monotonically toward the cluster centers. Indeed, the specific star formation rate in the cores of these distant clusters is consistent with field values at similar redshifts, indicating that at $z>1.4$ environment-dependent quenching had not yet been established in ISCS clusters. Combining these observations with complementary studies showing a rapid increase in the AGN fraction, a stochastic star formation history, and a major merging episode at the same epoch in this cluster sample, we suggest that the starburst activity is likely merger-driven and that the subsequent quenching is due to feedback from merger-fueled AGN. The totality of the evidence suggests we are witnessing the final quenching period that brings an end to the era of star formation in galaxy clusters and initiates the era of passive evolution.
  • We report 31 GHz CARMA observations of IDCS J1426.5+3508, an infrared-selected galaxy cluster at z = 1.75. A Sunyaev-Zel'dovich decrement is detected towards this cluster, indicating a total mass of M200 = (4.3 +/- 1.1) x 10^{14} Msun in agreement with the approximate X-ray mass of ~5 x 10^{14} Msun. IDCS J1426.5+3508 is by far the most distant cluster yet detected via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, and the most massive z >= 1.4 galaxy cluster found to date. Despite the mere ~1% probability of finding it in the 8.82 deg^2 IRAC Distant Cluster Survey, IDCS J1426.5+3508 is not completely unexpected in LCDM once the area of large, existing surveys is considered. IDCS J1426.5+3508 is, however, among the rarest, most extreme clusters ever discovered, and indeed is an evolutionary precursor to the most massive known clusters at all redshifts. We discuss how imminent, highly sensitive Sunyaev-Zel'dovich experiments will complement infrared techniques for statistical studies of the formation of the most massive galaxy clusters in the z > 1.5 Universe, including potential precursors to IDCS J1426.5+3508.
  • The Spitzer Space Telescope has identified a population of ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) at z ~ 2 that may play an important role in the evolution of massive galaxies. We measure the stellar masses of two populations of Spitzer-selected ULIRGs, both of which have extremely red R-[24] colors (dust-obscured galaxies, or DOGs) and compare our results with sub-millimeter selected galaxies (SMGs). One set of 39 DOGs has a local maximum in their mid-IR spectral energy distribution (SED) at rest-frame 1.6um associated with stellar emission ("bump DOGs"), while the other set of 51 DOGs has a power-law dominated mid-IR SED with spectral features typical of obscured AGN ("power-law DOGs"). We use stellar population synthesis models applied self-consistently to broad-band photometry in the rest-frame ultra-violet, optical, and near-infrared of each of these populations and test a variety of stellar population synthesis codes, star-formation histories (SFHs), and initial mass functions (IMFs). Assuming a simple stellar population SFH and a Chabrier IMF, we find that the median and inner quartile stellar masses of SMGs, bump DOGs and power-law DOGs are given by log(M_*/M_sun) = 10.42_-0.36^+0.42, 10.62_-0.32^+0.36, and 10.71_-0.34^+0.40, respectively. Implementing more complicated SFHs with multiple age components increases these mass estimates by up to 0.5 dex. Our stellar mass estimates are consistent with physical mechanisms for the origin of z~2 ULIRGs that result in high star-formation rates for a given stellar mass. Such mechanisms are usually driven by a major merger of two gas-rich systems, rather than smooth accretion of gas and small satellites.
  • We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging of 22 ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) at z~2 with extremely red R-[24] colors (called dust-obscured galaxies, or DOGs) which have a local maximum in their spectral energy distribution (SED) at rest-frame 1.6um associated with stellar emission. These sources, which we call "bump DOGs", have star-formation rates of 400-4000 Msun/yr and have redshifts derived from mid-IR spectra which show strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission --- a sign of vigorous on-going star-formation. Using a uniform morphological analysis, we look for quantifiable differences between bump DOGs, power-law DOGs (Spitzer-selected ULIRGs with mid-IR SEDs dominated by a power-law and spectral features that are more typical of obscured active galactic nuclei than starbursts), sub-millimeter selected galaxies (SMGs), and other less-reddened ULIRGs from the Spitzer extragalactic First Look Survey (XFLS). Bump DOGs are larger than power-law DOGs (median Petrosian radius of 8.4 +/- 2.7 kpc vs. 5.5 +/- 2.3 kpc) and exhibit more diffuse and irregular morphologies (median M_20 of -1.08 +/- 0.05 vs. -1.48 +/- 0.05). These trends are qualitatively consistent with expectations from simulations of major mergers in which merging systems during the peak star-formation rate period evolve from M_20 = -1.0 to M_20 = -1.7. Less obscured ULIRGs (i.e., non-DOGs) tend to have more regular, centrally peaked, single-object morphologies rather than diffuse and irregular morphologies. This distinction in morphologies may imply that less obscured ULIRGs sample the merger near the end of the peak star-formation rate period. Alternatively, it may indicate that the intense star-formation in these less-obscured ULIRGs is not the result of a recent major merger.
  • We report the X-ray detection of two z>1.4 infrared-selected galaxy clusters from the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS). We present new data from the Hubble Space Telescope and the W. M. Keck Observatory that spectroscopically confirm cluster ISCS J1432.4+3250 at z=1.49, the most distant of 18 confirmed z>1 clusters in the ISCS to date. We also present new spectroscopy for ISCS J1438.1+3414, previously reported at z = 1.41, and measure its dynamical mass. Clusters ISCS J1432.4+3250 and ISCS J1438.1+3414 are detected in 36ks and 143ks Chandra exposures at significances of 5.2 sigma and 9.7 sigma, from which we measure total masses of log(M_{200,Lx}/Msun) = 14.4 +/- 0.2 and 14.35^{+0.14}_{-0.11}, respectively. The consistency of the X-ray and dynamical properties of these high redshift clusters further demonstrates that the ISCS is robustly detecting massive clusters to at least z = 1.5.
  • We report the discovery of a six-month-long mid-infrared transient, SDWFS-MT-1 (aka SN 2007va), in the Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey Bootes field. The transient, located in a z=0.19 low luminosity (M_[4.5]~-18.6 mag, L/L_MilkyWay~0.01) metal-poor (12+log(O/H)~7.8) irregular galaxy, peaked at a mid-infrared absolute magnitude of M_[4.5]~-24.2 in the 4.5 micron Spitzer/IRAC band and emitted a total energy of at least 10^51 ergs. The optical emission was likely fainter than the mid-infrared, although our constraints on the optical emission are poor because the transient peaked when the source was "behind" the Sun. The Spitzer data are consistent with emission by a modified black body with a temperature of ~1350 K. We rule out a number of scenarios for the origin of the transient such as a Galactic star, AGN activity, GRB, tidal disruption of a star by a black hole and gravitational lensing. The most plausible scenario is a supernova exploding inside a massive, optically thick circumstellar medium, composed of multiple shells of previously ejected material. If the proposed scenario is correct, then a significant fraction (~10%) of the most luminous supernova may be self-enshrouded by dust not only before but also after the supernova occurs. The spectral energy distribution of the progenitor of such a supernova would be a slightly cooler version of eta Carina, peaking at 20-30 microns.
  • We present SHARC-II 350um imaging of twelve 24um-bright (F_24um > 0.8 mJy) Dust-Obscured Galaxies (DOGs) and CARMA 1mm imaging of a subset of 2 DOGs, all selected from the Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. Detections of 4 DOGs at 350um imply IR luminosities which are consistent within a factor of 2 of expectations based on a warm dust spectral energy distribution (SED) scaled to the observed 24um flux density. The 350um upper limits for the 8 non-detected DOGs are consistent with both Mrk231 and M82 (warm dust SEDs), but exclude cold dust (Arp220) SEDs. The two DOGs targeted at 1mm were not detected in our CARMA observations, placing strong constraints on the dust temperature: T_dust > 35-60 K. Assuming these dust properties apply to the entire sample, we find dust masses of ~3x10^8 M_sun. In comparison to other dusty z ~ 2 galaxy populations such as sub-millimeter galaxies (SMGs) and other Spitzer-selected high-redshift sources, this sample of DOGs has higher IR luminosities (2x10^13 L_sun vs. 6x10^12 L_sun for the other galaxy populations), warmer dust temperatures (>35-60 K vs. ~30 K), and lower inferred dust masses (3x10^8 M_sun vs. 3x10^9 M_sun). Herschel and SCUBA-2 surveys should be able to detect hundreds of these power-law dominated DOGs. We use HST and Spitzer/IRAC data to estimate stellar masses of these sources and find that the stellar to gas mass ratio may be higher in our 24um-bright sample of DOGs than in SMGs and other Spitzer-selected sources. Although larger sample sizes are needed to provide a definitive conclusion, the data are consistent with an evolutionary trend in which the formation of massive galaxies at z~2 involves a sub-millimeter bright, cold-dust and star-formation dominated phase followed by a 24um-bright, warm-dust and AGN-dominated phase.
  • We present a new survey strategy to discover and study high redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). By targeting massive galaxy clusters at 0.9<z<1.5, we obtain a twofold improvement in the efficiency of finding SNe compared to an HST field survey and a factor of three improvement in the total yield of SN detections in relatively dust-free red-sequence galaxies. In total, sixteen SNe were discovered at z>0.95, nine of which were in galaxy clusters. This strategy provides a SN sample that can be used to decouple the effects of host galaxy extinction and intrinsic color in high redshift SNe, thereby reducing one of the largest systematic uncertainties in SN cosmology.
  • The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS) is a four-epoch infrared survey of ten square degrees in the Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey using the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. SDWFS, a Cycle four Spitzer Legacy project, occupies a unique position in the area-depth survey space defined by other Spitzer surveys. The four epochs that make up SDWFS permit -- for the first time -- the selection of infrared-variable and high proper motion objects over a wide field on timescales of years. Because of its large survey volume, SDWFS is sensitive to galaxies out to z~3 with relatively little impact from cosmic variance for all but the richest systems. The SDWFS datasets will thus be especially useful for characterizing galaxy evolution beyond z~1.5. This paper explains the SDWFS observing strategy and data processing, presents the SDWFS mosaics and source catalogs, and discusses some early scientific findings. The publicly-released, full-depth catalogs contain 6.78, 5.23, 1.20, and 0.96 x 10e5 distinct sources detected to the average 5-sigma, 4" diameter, aperture-corrected limits of 19.77, 18.83, 16.50, and 15.82 Vega mag at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 micron, respectively. The SDWFS number counts and color-color distribution are consistent with other, earlier Spitzer surveys. At the 6 min integration time of the SDWFS IRAC imaging, more than 50% of isolated FIRST radio sources and more than 80% of on-axis XBootes sources are detected out to 8.0 micron. Finally, we present the four highest proper motion IRAC-selected sources identified from the multi-epoch imaging, two of which are likely field brown dwarfs of mid-T spectral class.
  • We present high spatial resolution optical and near-infrared imaging obtained using the ACS, WFPC2 and NICMOS cameras aboard the Hubble Space Telescope of 31 24um--bright z~2 Dust Obscured Galaxies (DOGs) identified in the Bootes Field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. Although this subset of DOGs have mid-IR spectral energy distributions dominated by a power-law component suggestive of an AGN, all but one of the galaxies are spatially extended and not dominated by an unresolved component at rest-frame UV or optical wavelengths. The observed V-H and I-H colors of the extended components are 0.2-3 magnitudes redder than normal star-forming galaxies. All but 1 have axial ratios >0.3, making it unlikely that DOGs are composed of an edge-on star-forming disk. We model the spatially extended component of the surface brightness distributions of the DOGs with a Sersic profile and find effective radii of 1-6 kpc. This sample of DOGs is smaller than most sub-millimeter galaxies (SMGs), but larger than quiescent high-redshift galaxies. Non-parametric measures (Gini and M20) of DOG morphologies suggest that these galaxies are more dynamically relaxed than local ULIRGs. We estimate lower limits to the stellar masses of DOGs based on the rest-frame optical photometry and find that these range from ~10^(9-11) M_sun. If major mergers are the progenitors of DOGs, then these observations suggest that DOGs may represent a post-merger evolutionary stage.
  • We have identified 335 galaxy cluster and group candidates, 106 of which are at z > 1, using a 4.5 um selected sample of objects from a 7.25 deg^2 region in the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) Shallow Survey. Clusters were identified as 3-dimensional overdensities using a wavelet algorithm, based on photometric redshift probability distributions derived from IRAC and NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey data. We estimate only ~10% of the detections are spurious. To date 12 of the z > 1 candidates have been confirmed spectroscopically, at redshifts from 1.06 to 1.41. Velocity dispersions of ~750 km/s for two of these argue for total cluster masses well above 10^14 M_sun, as does the mass estimated from the rest frame near infrared stellar luminosity. Although not selected to contain a red sequence, some evidence for red sequences is present in the spectroscopically confirmed clusters, and brighter galaxies are systematically redder than the mean galaxy color in clusters at all redshifts. The mean I - [3.6] color for cluster galaxies up to z ~ 1 is well matched by a passively evolving model in which stars are formed in a 0.1 Gyr burst starting at redshift z_f = 3. At z > 1, a wider range of formation histories is needed, but higher formation redshifts (i.e. z_f > 3) are favored for most clusters.
  • We present a measure of the hard (2-8 keV) X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of Active Galactic Nuclei up to z~5. At high redshifts, the wide area coverage of the Chandra Multiwavength Project is crucial to detect rare and luminous (Lx > 10^44 erg s^-1) AGN. The inclusion of samples from deeper published surveys, such as the Chandra Deep Fields, allows us to span the lower Lx range of the XLF. Our sample is selected from both the hard (z < 3; f(2-8 keV) > 6.3x10^-16 erg cm^-2 s^-1) and soft (z > 3; f(0.5-2.0 keV) > 1.0x10^-16 erg cm^-2 s^-1) energy band detections. Within our optical magnitude limits (r',i' < 24), we achieve an adequate level of completeness (>50%) regarding X-ray source identification (i.e., redshift). We find that the luminosity function is similar to that found in previous X-ray surveys up to z~3 with an evolution dependent upon both luminosity and redshift. At z > 3, there is a significant decline in the numbers of AGN with an evolution rate similar to that found by studies of optically-selected QSOs. Based on our XLF, we assess the resolved fraction of the Cosmic X-ray Background, the cumulative mass density of Supermassive Black Holes (SMBHs), and the comparison of the mean accretion rate onto SMBHs and the star formation history of galaxies as a function of redshift. A coevolution scenario up to z~2 is plausible though at higher redshifts the accretion rate onto SMBHs drops more rapidly. Finally, we highlight the need for better statistics of high redshift AGN at z > 3, which is achievable with the upcoming Chandra surveys.
  • We combine the results of the Spitzer IRAC Shallow Survey and the Chandra XBootes Survey of the 8.5 square degrees Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide- Field Survey to produce the largest comparison of mid-IR and X-ray sources to date. The comparison is limited to sources with X-ray fluxes >8x10-15 erg cm-2s-1 in the 0.5-7.0 keV range and mid-IR sources with 3.6 um fluxes brighter than 18.4 mag (12.3 uJy). In this most sensitive IRAC band, 85% of the 3086 X-ray sources have mid-IR counterparts at an 80% confidence level based on a Bayesian matching technique. Only 2.5% of the sample have no IRAC counterpart at all based on visual inspection. Even for a smaller but a significantly deeper Chandra survey in the same field, the IRAC Shallow Survey recovers most of the X-ray sources. A majority (65%) of the Chandra sources detected in all four IRAC bands occupy a well-defined region of IRAC [3.6] - [4.5] vs [5.8] - [8.0] color-color space. These X-ray sources are likely infrared luminous, unobscured type I AGN with little mid-infrared flux contributed by the AGN host galaxy. Of the remaining Chandra sources, most are lower luminosity type I and type II AGN whose mid-IR emission is dominated by the host galaxy, while approximately 5% are either Galactic stars or very local galaxies.
  • We present near-infrared spectroscopic observations for a sample of ten optically faint luminous infrared galaxies (R-[24]> 14) using Keck NIRSPEC and Gemini NIRI. The sample is selected from a 24 micron Spitzer MIPS imaging survey of the NDWFS Bootes field. We measure accurate redshifts in the range 1.3<z<3.4. Based on either emission line widths or line diagnostics, we find that all ten galaxies harbor luminous AGN. Seven sources are type I AGN, exhibiting broad (>1900 km/s) Halpha or Hbeta emission lines; the remaining three are type II AGN. Given their large mid-IR luminosities and faint optical magnitudes, we might expect these sources to be heavily extincted quasars, and therefore only visible as type II AGN. The visibility of broad lines in 70% of the sources suggests that it is unlikely that these AGN are being viewed through the mid-plane of a dusty torus. For four of the sources we constrain the Halpha/Hbeta Balmer decrement and estimate the extinction to the emission line region to be large for both type I and type II AGN, with A_Halpha > 2.4-5 mag. Since the narrow-line region is also extincted and the UV continuum emission from the host galaxies is extremely faint, this suggests that much of the obscuration is contributed by dust on large (~kpc) scales within the host galaxies. These sources may be examples of "host-obscured" AGN which could have space densities comparable or greater to that of optically luminous type I AGN with similar bolometric luminosities.
  • We measure the 2-point correlation function, xi(AG), between galaxies and quasar absorption line systems at z<1, using the dataset of Morris & Jannuzi (2006; paper I) on 16 lines of sight (LOS) with UV spectroscopy and galaxy multi-object spectroscopy. The measurements are made in 2-D redshift space out to pi=20/h Mpc (comoving) along the LOS and out to 2/h Mpc projected; as a function of HI column density in the range N(HI) = 1E13-1E19 cm^-2, for CIV systems and as a function of galaxy spectral type. This extends the absorber-galaxy pair count analysis of paper I. We find that the peak amplitude of xi(AG) at the smallest separations increases slowly as the lower limit on N(HI) is increased from 1E13 to 1E16 cm^-2, and then jumps sharply (albeit with substantial uncertainty) at N(HI)>1E17 cm^-2. For CIV absorbers, the peak strength of xi(AG) is comparable to that of HI absorbers with N(HI)>1E16.5 cm^-2. We do not reproduce the differences reported by Chen et al. between 1-D xi(AG) measurements using galaxy sub-samples of different spectral types, but the full impact of systematic differences in our samples is hard to quantify. We compare the observations with smoothed particle hydrodynamical (SPH) simulations and discover that in the observations xi(AG) is more concentrated to the smallest separations than in the simulations. The latter also display a `finger of god' elongation of xi(AG) along the LOS in redshift space, which is absent from our data, but similar to that found by Ryan-Weber for the cross-correlation of quasar absorbers and HI-emission-selected galaxies. The physical origin of these `fingers of god' is unclear and we highlight several possible areas for further investigation.
  • Accurate photometric redshifts are calculated for nearly 200,000 galaxies to a 4.5 micron flux limit of ~13 uJy in the 8.5 deg^2 Spitzer/IRAC Shallow survey. Using a hybrid photometric redshift algorithm incorporating both neural-net and template-fitting techniques, calibrated with over 15,000 spectroscopic redshifts, a redshift accuracy of \sigma = 0.06(1+z) is achieved for 95% of galaxies at 0<z<1.5. The accuracy is \sigma = 0.12(1+z) for 95% of AGN at 0<z<3. Redshift probability functions, central to several ongoing studies of the galaxy population, are computed for the full sample. We demonstrate that these functions accurately represent the true redshift probability density, allowing the calculation of valid confidence intervals for all objects. These probability functions have already been used to successfully identify a population of Spitzer-selected high redshift (z>1) galaxy clusters. We present one such spectroscopically confirmed cluster at <z>=1.24, ISCS J1434.5+3427. Finally, we present a measurement of the 4.5 micron-selected galaxy redshift distribution.
  • Spectra have been obtained with the low-resolution modules of the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on the Spitzer Space Telescope (Spitzer) for 58 sources having f$_{\nu}$(24 micron) > 0.75 mJy. Sources were chosen from a survey of 8.2 deg$^{2}$ within the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey region in Bootes (NDWFS) using the Multiband Imaging Photometer (MIPS) on the Spitzer Space Telescope. Most sources are optically very faint (I > 24mag). Redshifts have previously been determined for 34 sources, based primarily on the presence of a deep 9.7 micron silicate absorption feature, with a median z of 2.2. Spectra are presented for the remaining 24 sources for which we were previously unable to determine a confident redshift because the IRS spectra show no strong features. Optical photometry from the NDWFS and infrared photometry with MIPS and the Infrared Array Camera on the Spitzer Space Telescope (IRAC) are given, with K photometry from the Keck I telescope for some objects. The sources without strong spectral features have overall spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and distributions among optical and infrared fluxes which are similar to those for the sources with strong absorption features. Nine of the 24 sources are found to have feasible redshift determinations based on fits of a weak silicate absorption feature. Results confirm that the "1 mJy" population of 24 micron Spitzer sources which are optically faint is dominated by dusty sources with spectroscopic indicators of an obscured AGN rather than a starburst. There remain 14 of the 58 sources observed in Bootes for which no redshift could be estimated, and 5 of these sources are invisible at all optical wavelengths.
  • We present a survey of serendipitous extended X-ray sources and optical cluster candidates from the Chandra Multi-wavelength Project (ChaMP). Our main goal is to make an unbiased comparison of X-ray and optical cluster detection methods. In 130 archival Chandra pointings covering 13 square degrees, we use a wavelet decomposition technique to detect 55 extended sources, of which 6 are nearby single galaxies. Our X-ray cluster catalog reaches a typical flux limit of about ~10^-14 erg s^-1 cm^-2, with a median cluster core radius of 21 arcsec. For 56 of the 130 X-ray fields, we use the ChaMP's deep NOAO/4m MOSAIC g, r, and i imaging to independently detect cluster candidates using a Voronoi tessellation and percolation (VTP) method. Red-sequence filtering decreases the galaxy fore/background contamination and provides photometric redshifts to z~0.7. From the overlapping 6.1 square degree X-ray/optical imaging, we find 115 optical clusters (of which 11% are in the X-ray catalog) and 28 X-ray clusters (of which 46% are in the optical VTP catalog). The median redshift of the 13 X-ray/optical clusters is 0.41, and their median X-ray luminosity (0.5-2 keV) is L_X=(2.65\pm0.19)x10^43 ergs s^-1. The clusters in our sample that are only detected in our optical data are poorer on average (~4sigma) than the X-ray/optically matched clusters, which may partially explain the difference in the detection fractions.
  • We determine the contribution of AGN to the mid-IR emission of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) at z>0.6 by measuring the mid-IR dust continuum slope of 20,039 mid-IR sources. The 24 micron sources are selected from a Spitzer/MIPS survey of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey Bo\"otes field and have corresponding 8 micron data from the IRAC Shallow Survey. There is a clear bimodal distribution in the 24 micron to 8 micron flux ratio. The X-ray detected sources fall within the peak corresponding to a flat spectrum in nufnu, implying that it is populated by AGN-dominated LIRGs, whereas the peak corresponding to a higher 24 micron to 8 micron flux ratio is likely due to LIRGs whose infrared emission is powered by starbursts. The 24 micron emission is increasingly dominated by AGN at higher 24 micron flux densities (f_24): the AGN fraction of the z>0.6 sources increases from ~9% at f_24 ~ 0.35 mJy to 74+/-20% at f_24 ~ 3 mJy in good agreement with model predictions. Deep 24 micron, small area surveys, like GOODS, will be strongly dominated by starburst galaxies. AGN are responsible for ~ 3-7% of the total 24 micron background.
  • We present low-resolution (64 < R < 124) mid-infrared (8--38 micron) Spitzer/IRS spectra of two z~1.3 ultraluminous infrared galaxies (LFIR~10^13) discovered in a Spitzer/MIPS survey of the Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS). MIPS J142824.0+352619 is a bright 160 micron source with a large infrared-to-optical flux density ratio and a possible lensing amplification of <~10. The 6.2, 7.7, 11.3, and 12.8 micron PAH emission bands in its IRS spectrum indicate a redshift of z~1.3. The large equivalent width of the 6.2 micron PAH feature indicates that at least 50% of the mid-infrared energy is generated in a starburst, an interpretation that is supported by a large [NeII]/[NeIII] ratio and a low upper limit on the X-ray luminosity. SST24 J142827.19+354127.71 has the brightest 24 micron flux (10.55 mJy) among optically faint (R > 20) galaxies in the NDWFS. Its mid-infrared spectrum lacks emission features, but the broad 9.7 micron silicate absorption band places this source at z~1.3. Given this redshift, SST24 J142827.19+354127.71 has among the largest rest-frame 5 micron luminosities known. The similarity of its SED to those of known AGN-dominated ULIRGs and its lack of either PAH features or large amounts of cool dust indicate that the powerful mid-infrared emission is dominated by an active nucleus rather than a starburst. Our results illustrate the power of the IRS in identifying massive galaxies in the ``redshift desert'' and in discerning their power sources. Because they are bright, MIPS J142824.0+352619 (pending future observations to constrain its lensing amplification) and SST24 J142827.19+354127.71 are useful z>1 templates of a high luminosity starburst and AGN, respectively.
  • We report the discovery of a very large, spatially extended Ly alpha -emitting nebula at z=2.656 associated with a luminous mid-infrared source. The bright mid-infrared source (F(24um)=0.86 mJy) was first detected in observations made using the Spitzer Space Telescope. Existing broad-band imaging data from the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey revealed the mid-infrared source to be associated with a diffuse, spatially extended, optical counterpart in the Bw band. Spectroscopy and further imaging of this target reveals that the optical source is an almost purely line-emitting nebula with little, if any, detectable diffuse continuum emission. The Lya nebula has a luminosity of L[Lya] ~ 1.7e44 erg/s and an extent of at least 20 arcsec (160 kpc). Its central ~8 arcsec shows an ordered, monotonic velocity profile; interpreted as rotation, this region encloses a mass M = 6e12 Msun. Several sources lie within the nebula. The central region of the nebula shows narrow (~365 km/s) emission lines of CIV and HeII. The mid-infrared source is a compact object lying within the nebula, but offset from the center by a projected distance of ~2.5 arcsec (20 kpc), and likely to be an enshrouded AGN. A young star-forming galaxy lies near the northern end of the nebula. We suggest that the nebula is a site of recent multiple galaxy and AGN formation, with the spatial distribution of galaxies within the nebula perhaps tracking the formation history of the system.
  • We have surveyed a field covering 9.0 degrees^2 within the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey region in Bootes with the Multiband Imaging Photometer on the Spitzer Space Telescope (SST) to a limiting 24 um flux density of 0.3 mJy. Thirty one sources from this survey with F(24um) > 0.75 mJy which are optically very faint (R > 24.5 mag) have been observed with the low-resolution modules of the Infrared Spectrograph on SST. Redshifts derived primarily from strong silicate absorption features are reported here for 17 of these sources; 10 of these are optically invisible (R > 26 mag), with no counterpart in B_W, R, or I. The observed redshifts for 16 sources are 1.7 < z < 2.8. These represent a newly discovered population of highly obscured sources at high redshift with extreme infrared to optical ratios. Using IRS spectra of local galaxies as templates, we find that a majority of the sources have mid-infrared spectral shapes most similar to ultraluminous infrared galaxies powered primarily by AGN. Assuming the same templates also apply at longer wavelengths, bolometric luminosities exceed 10^13 L(solar).
  • We have combined a survey at 24 microns to 0.3 mJy with the Multiband Imaging Photometer (MIPS) on the Spitzer Space Telescope, a 20 cm A-array VLA survey covering 0.5 deg^2, and an existing 172 ks Chandra X-Ray Observatory exposure to investigate the nature of optically faint radio and X-ray sources in the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS) in Bootes. We find little overlap between the radio and infrared selected populations: only 9% of the infrared sources are detected in the radio and only 33% of the radio sources are detected in the infrared. Thirty-six (10%) of the 377 compact radio sources lack optical counterparts in the NDWFS Bw, R, & I images. We refer to these objects as optically invisible radio sources (OIRS). Only four of the thirty-one OIRSs observed with MIPS are detected at 24 microns. Comparisons of the radio and infrared properties of the OIRSs with various galaxy spectral energy distributions demonstrate that most of these sources are powered by AGN rather than starbursts. Similarly, eleven X-ray sources observed by both MIPS and the VLA are classified as optically invisible X-ray sources (OIXS). None are detected at 24 microns or 20 cm. All seven OIXSs detected in Chandra's 0.5-2 keV band have infrared to X-ray flux ratios consistent with their luminosity being dominated by an unobscured AGN. From these results we conclude that both the optically invisible radio and X-ray source populations are primarily AGN, relatively unaffected by dust and most likely at z > 1. No OIRSs are detected in X-ray emission and no OIXSs are detected at 20 cm. However, given the wide range in radio and X-ray properties of known AGN and the size of our samples, this lack of overlap does not necessarily imply AGN source populations.
  • For measurement of the AGN luminosity function and its evolution, X-ray selection samples all types of AGN and provides reduced obscuration bias in comparison with UV-excess or optical surveys. The apparent decline in optically-selected quasars above z~3 may be strongly affected by such a bias. The Chandra Multiwavelength Project (ChaMP) is characterizing serendipitously detected X-ray sources in a large number of fields with archival Chandra imaging. We present a preliminary measure of the co-moving space density using a sample of 311 AGN found in 23 ChaMP fields (~1.8 deg^2) supplemented with 57 X-ray bright AGN from the CDF-N and CDF-S. Within our X-ray flux (f(0.3-8.0 keV) > 4x10^-15 erg cm^-2 s^-1) and optical magnitude (r' < 22.5) limits, our sample includes 14 broad emission line AGN at z > 3. Using this X-ray selected sample, we detect a turnover in the co-moving space density of luminous type 1 AGN (log Lx > 44.5; units erg s^-1; measured in the 0.3-8.0 keV band and corrected for Galactic absorption) at z > 2.5. Our X-ray sample is the first to show a behavior similar to the well established evolution of the optical quasar luminosity function. A larger sample of high redshift AGN and with a greater fraction of identified sources, either spectroscopic or photometric, at faint optical magnitudes (r' > 22.5) are required to remove the remaining uncertainty in our measure of the X-ray luminosity function. We confirm that for z < 1, lower luminosity AGN (log Lx < 44.5) are more prevalent by more than an order of magnitude than those with high luminosity. We have combined the Chandra sample with AGN from the ROSAT surveys to present a measure of the space density of luminous type 1 AGN in the soft X-ray band (0.5-2.0 keV) which confirms the broad band turnover described above.
  • The IRAC shallow survey covers 8.5 square degrees in the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey in Bootes with 3 or more 30 second exposures per position. An overview of the survey design, reduction, calibration, star-galaxy separation, and initial results is provided. The survey includes approximately 370,000, 280,000, 38,000, and 34,000 sources brighter than the 5 sigma limits of 6.4, 8.8, 51, and 50 microJy at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns respectively, including some with unusual spectral energy distributions.