• Seven temperate Earth-sized exoplanets readily amenable for atmospheric studies transit the nearby ultracool dwarf star TRAPPIST-1 (refs 1,2). Their atmospheric regime is unknown and could range from extended primordial hydrogen-dominated to depleted atmospheres (refs 3-6). Hydrogen in particular is a powerful greenhouse gas that may prevent the habitability of inner planets while enabling the habitability of outer ones (refs 6-8). An atmosphere largely dominated by hydrogen, if cloud-free, should yield prominent spectroscopic signatures in the near-infrared detectable during transits. Observations of the innermost planets have ruled out such signatures (ref 9). However, the outermost planets are more likely to have sustained such a Neptune-like atmosphere (refs 10,11). Here, we report observations for the four planets within or near the system's habitable zone, the circumstellar region where liquid water could exist on a planetary surface (refs 12-14). These planets do not exhibit prominent spectroscopic signatures at near-infrared wavelengths either, which rules out cloud-free hydrogen-dominated atmospheres for TRAPPIST-1 d, e and f, with significance of 8, 6 and 4 sigma, respectively. Such an atmosphere is instead not excluded for planet g. As high-altitude clouds and hazes are not expected in hydrogen-dominated atmospheres around planets with such insolation (refs 15,16), these observations further support their terrestrial and potentially habitable nature.
  • We present sixteen occultation and three transit light curves for the ultra-short period hot Jupiter WASP-103 b, in addition to five new radial velocity measurements. We combine these observations with archival data and perform a global analysis of the resulting extensive dataset, accounting for the contamination from a nearby star. We detect the thermal emission of the planet in both the $z'$ and $K_{\mathrm{S}}$-bands, the measured occultation depths being 699$\pm$110 ppm (6.4-$\sigma$) and $3567_{-350}^{+400}$ ppm (10.2-$\sigma$), respectively. We use these two measurements together with recently published HST/WFC3 data to derive joint constraints on the properties of WASP-103 b's dayside atmosphere. On one hand, we find that the $z'$-band and WFC3 data are best fit by an isothermal atmosphere at 2900 K or an atmosphere with a low H$_2$O abundance. On the other hand, we find an unexpected excess in the $K_{\mathrm{S}}$-band measured flux compared to these models, which requires confirmation with additional observations before any interpretation can be given. From our global data analysis, we also derive a broad-band optical transmission spectrum that shows a minimum around 700 nm and increasing values towards both shorter and longer wavelengths. This is in agreement with a previous study based on a large fraction of the archival transit light curves used in our analysis. The unusual profile of this transmission spectrum is poorly matched by theoretical spectra and is not confirmed by more recent observations at higher spectral resolution. Additional data, both in emission and transmission, are required to better constrain the atmospheric properties of WASP-103 b.
  • The nearby red dwarf binary GJ65AB (UB+BL Ceti, M5.5Ve+M6Ve) is a cornerstone system to probe the physics of very low mass stars. We present new interferometric measurements of the angular diameters of the two components of GJ65AB with the PIONIER instrument in the H band: thetaUD (A) = 0.558 +/- 0.008 +/- 0.020 mas and thetaUD (B) = 0.539 +/- 0.009 +/- 0.020 mas. They translate into limb-darkened angular diameters of LD (A) = 0.573 +/- 0.021 mas and LD (B) = 0.554 +/- 0.022 mas. From the known parallax, the radii are R(A) = 0.165 +/- 0.006 Rsun and R(B) = 0.159 +/- 0.006 Rsun (sigma(R)/R = 4%). We also observed GJ65AB with the VLT/NACO adaptive optics and refine the orbital parameters and infrared magnitudes of the system. We derive masses for the two components of m(A) = 0.1225 +/- 0.0043 Msun and m(B) = 0.1195 +/- 0.0043 Msun (sigma(m)/m = 4%). To derive the radial and rotational velocities of the two stars, as well as their relative metallicity with respect to Proxima, we also present new individual UVES high resolution spectra. Placing GJ65 A&B in the mass-radius diagram shows that their radii are larger respectively by 14 +/- 4% and 12 +/- 4% compared to expectations from the models by Baraffe et al. (2015). Following Chabrier et al. (2007), we propose that this discrepancy is caused by the inhibition of convective energy transport by a strong internal magnetic field generated by dynamo effect in these two fast rotating stars. A comparison with the almost identical twin but slowly-rotating Proxima strengthens this hypothesis, as the radius of Proxima does not appear inflated compared to models.
  • Context: Transmission spectroscopy has proven to be a useful tool for the study of exoplanet atmospheres, and has lead to the detection of a small number of elements and molecules (Na, K, H$_2$O), but also revealed that many planets show flat transmission spectra consistent with the presence of opaque high-altitude hazes or clouds. Aims: We apply this technique to the $M_P=0.38 M_{jup}$, $R_p=1.12 R_{jup}$, $P=2.78d$ planet WASP-49b, aiming to characterize its transmission spectrum between 0.73 and 1 $\mathrm{\mu}$m and search for the features of K and H$_2$O. Methods: Three transits of WASP-49b have been observed with the FORS2 instrument installed at the VLT/UT1 telescope at the ESO Paranal site. We used FORS2 in MXU mode with grism GRIS_600z, producing simultaneous multiwavelength transit lightcurves throughout the i' and z' bands. We combined these data with independent broadband photometry from the Euler and TRAPPIST telescopes to obtain a good measurement of the transit shape. Strong correlated noise structures are present in the FORS2 lightcurves, which are due to rotating flat-field structures that are introduced by inhomogeneities of the linear atmospheric dispersion corrector's transparency. We accounted for these structures by constructing common noise models from the residuals of lightcurves bearing the same noise structures, and used them together with simple parametric models to infer the transmission spectrum. Results: We present three independent transmission spectra of WASP-49b between 0.73 and 1.02 $\mu m$, as well as a transmission spectrum between 0.65 and 1.02 $\mu m$ from the combined analysis of FORS2 and broadband data. The results obtained from the three individual epochs agree well. The transmission spectrum of WASP-49b is best fit by atmospheric models containing a cloud deck at pressure levels of 1 mbar or lower.
  • Context. GJ 436b is one of the few transiting warm Neptunes for which a detailed characterisation of the atmosphere is possible, whereas its non-negligible orbital eccentricity calls for further investigation. Independent analyses of several individual datasets obtained with Spitzer have led to contradicting results attributed to the different techniques used to treat the instrumental effects. Aims. We aim at investigating these previous controversial results and developing our knowledge of the system based on the full Spitzer photometry dataset combined with new Doppler measurements obtained with the HARPS spectrograph. We also want to search for additional planets. Methods. We optimise aperture photometry techniques and the photometric deconvolution algorithm DECPHOT to improve the data reduction of the Spitzer photometry spanning wavelengths from 3-24 {\mu}m. Adding the high precision HARPS radial velocity data, we undertake a Bayesian global analysis of the system considering both instrumental and stellar effects on the flux variation. Results. We present a refined radius estimate of RP=4.10 +/- 0.16 R_Earth, mass MP=25.4 +/- 2.1 M_Earth and eccentricity e= 0.162 +/- 0.004 for GJ 436b. Our measured transit depths remain constant in time and wavelength, in disagreement with the results of previous studies. In addition, we find that the post-occultation flare-like structure at 3.6 {\mu}m that led to divergent results on the occultation depth measurement is spurious. We obtain occultation depths at 3.6, 5.8, and 8.0 {\mu}m that are shallower than in previous works, in particular at 3.6 {\mu}m. However, these depths still appear consistent with a metal-rich atmosphere depleted in methane and enhanced in CO/CO2, although perhaps less than previously thought. We find no evidence for a potential planetary companion, stellar activity, nor for a stellar spin-orbit misalignment. [ABRIDGED]
  • Super-Earths transiting nearby bright stars are key objects that simultaneously allow for accurate measurements of both their mass and radius, providing essential constraints on their internal composition. We present here the confirmation, based on Spitzer transit observations, that the super-Earth HD 97658 b transits its host star. HD 97658 is a low-mass ($M_*=0.77\pm0.05\,M_{\odot}$) K1 dwarf, as determined from the Hipparcos parallax and stellar evolution modeling. To constrain the planet parameters, we carry out Bayesian global analyses of Keck-HIRES radial velocities, and MOST and Spitzer photometry. HD 97658 b is a massive ($M_P=7.55^{+0.83}_{-0.79} M_{\oplus}$) and large ($R_{P} = 2.247^{+0.098}_{-0.095} R_{\oplus}$ at 4.5 $\mu$m) super-Earth. We investigate the possible internal compositions for HD 97658 b. Our results indicate a large rocky component, by at least 60% by mass, and very little H-He components, at most 2% by mass. We also discuss how future asteroseismic observations can improve the knowledge of the HD 97658 system, in particular by constraining its age. Orbiting a bright host star, HD 97658 b will be a key target for coming space missions TESS, CHEOPS, PLATO, and also JWST, to characterize thoroughly its structure and atmosphere.
  • High-precision eclipse spectrophotometry of transiting terrestrial exoplanets represents a promising path for the first atmospheric characterizations of habitable worlds and the search for life outside our solar system. The detection of terrestrial planets transiting nearby late-type M-dwarfs could make this approach applicable within the next decade, with soon-to-come general facilities. In this context, we previously identified GJ 1214 as a high-priority target for a transit search, as the transit probability of a habitable planet orbiting this nearby M4.5 dwarf would be significantly enhanced by the transiting nature of GJ 1214 b, the super-Earth already known to orbit the star. Based on this observation, we have set up an ambitious high-precision photometric monitoring of GJ 1214 with the Spitzer Space Telescope to probe the inner part of its habitable zone in search of a transiting planet as small as Mars. We present here the results of this transit search. Unfortunately, we did not detect any other transiting planets. Assuming that GJ 1214 hosts a habitable planet larger than Mars that has an orbital period smaller than 20.9 days, our global analysis of the whole Spitzer dataset leads to an a posteriori no-transit probability of ~ 98%. Our analysis allows us to significantly improve the characterization of GJ 1214 b, to measure its occultation depth to be 70+-35 ppm at 4.5 microns, and to constrain it to be smaller than 205ppm (3-sigma upper limit) at 3.6 microns. In agreement with the many transmission measurements published so far for GJ 1214 b, these emission measurements are consistent with both a metal-rich and a cloudy hydrogen-rich atmosphere.
  • Since 1998, a planet-search program around main sequence stars within 50 pc in the southern hemisphere, is carried out with the CORALIE echelle spectrograph at La Silla Observatory. With an observing time span of more than 14 years, the CORALIE survey is now able to unveil Jovian planets on Jupiter's period domain. This growing period-interval coverage is important regarding to formation and migration models since observational constraints are still weak for periods beyond the ice line. Long-term precise Doppler measurements with the CORALIE echelle spectrograph, together with a few additional observations made with the HARPS spectrograph on the ESO 3.6m telescope, reveal radial velocity signatures of massive planetary companions in long period orbits. In this paper we present seven new planets orbiting HD27631, HD98649, HD106515A, HD166724, HD196067, HD219077, and HD220689 together with the CORALIE orbital parameters for three already known planets around HD10647, HD30562, and HD86226. The period range of the new planetary companions goes from 2200 to 5500 days and covers a mass domain between 1 and 10.5 MJup. Surprisingly, five of them present quite high eccentricities above e>0.57. A pumping scenario by Kozai mechanism may be invoked for HD106515Ab and HD196067b which are both orbiting stars in multiple systems. As the presence of a third massive body can't be inferred from the data of HD98649b, HD166724b, and HD219077b, the origin of the eccentricity of these systems remains unknown. Except for HD10647b, no constraint on the upper mass of the planets is provided by Hipparcos astrometric data. Finally it is interesting to note that the hosts of these long period planets show no metallicity excess.
  • We present twenty-three transit light curves and seven occultation light curves for the ultra-short period planet WASP-43 b, in addition to eight new measurements of the radial velocity of the star. Thanks to this extensive data set, we improve significantly the parameters of the system. Notably, the largely improved precision on the stellar density (2.41+-0.08 rho_sun) combined with constraining the age to be younger than a Hubble time allows us to break the degeneracy of the stellar solution mentioned in the discovery paper. The resulting stellar mass and size are 0.717+-0.025 M_sun and 0.667+-0.011 R_sun. Our deduced physical parameters for the planet are 2.034+-0.052 M_jup and 1.036+-0.019 R_jup. Taking into account its level of irradiation, the high density of the planet favors an old age and a massive core. Our deduced orbital eccentricity, 0.0035(-0.0025,+0.0060), is consistent with a fully circularized orbit. We detect the emission of the planet at 2.09 microns at better than 11-sigma, the deduced occultation depth being 1560+-140 ppm. Our detection of the occultation at 1.19 microns is marginal (790+-320 ppm) and more observations are needed to confirm it. We place a 3-sigma upper limit of 850 ppm on the depth of the occultation at ~0.9 microns. Together, these results strongly favor a poor redistribution of the heat to the night-side of the planet, and marginally favor a model with no day-side temperature inversion.
  • We report on the detection of a transit of the super-Earth 55 Cnc e with warm Spitzer in IRAC's 4.5-micron band. Our MCMC analysis includes an extensive modeling of the systematic effects affecting warm Spitzer photometry, and yields a transit depth of 410 +- 63 ppm, which translates to a planetary radius of 2.08 +- 0.16 R_Earth as measured in IRAC 4.5-micron channel. A planetary mass of 7.81 +- 0.58 M_Earth is derived from an extensive set of radial-velocity data, yielding a mean planetary density of 4.8 +- 1.3 g cm-3. Thanks to the brightness of its host star (V = 6, K = 4), 55 Cnc e is a unique target for the thorough characterization of a super-Earth orbiting around a solar-type star.
  • We report on the detection of GJ3634b, a super-Earth of mass m sin i = 7.0 +/-0.9 Mearth and period P = 2.64561 +/- 0.00066 day. Its host star is a M2.5 dwarf, has a mass of 0.45+/-0.05 Msun, a radius of 0.43+/-0.03 Rsun and lies 19.8+/-0.6 pc away from our Sun. The planet is detected after a radial-velocity campaign using the ESO/Harps spectrograph. GJ3634b had an a priori geometric probability to undergo transit of ~7% and, if telluric in composition, a non-grazing transit would produce a photometric dip of <~0.1%. We therefore followed-up upon the RV detection with photometric observations using the 4.5-micron band of the IRAC imager onboard Spitzer. Our six-hour long light curve excludes that a transit occurs for 2 sigma of the probable transit window, decreasing the probability that GJ3634b undergoes transit to ~0.5%.
  • We report measurements of the thermal emission of the young and massive planet CoRoT-2b at 4.5 and 8 microns with the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC). Our measured occultation depths are 0.510 +- 0.042 % and 0.41 +- 0.11 % at 4.5 and 8 microns, respectively. In addition to the CoRoT optical measurements, these planet/star flux ratios indicate a poor heat distribution to the night side of the planet and are in better agreement with an atmosphere free of temperature inversion layer. Still, the presence of such an inversion is not definitely ruled out by the observations and a larger wavelength coverage is required to remove the current ambiguity. Our global analysis of CoRoT, Spitzer and ground-based data confirms the large mass and size of the planet with slightly revised values (Mp = 3.47 +- 0.22 Mjup, Rp = 1.466 +- 0.044 Rjup). We find a small but significant offset in the timing of the occultation when compared to a purely circular orbital solution, leading to e cos(omega) = -0.00291 +- 0.00063 where e is the orbital eccentricity and omega is the argument of periastron. Constraining the age of the system to be at most of a few hundreds of Myr and assuming that the non-zero orbital eccentricity is not due to a third undetected body, we model the coupled orbital-tidal evolution of the system with various tidal Q values, core sizes and initial orbital parameters. For log(Q_s') = 5 - 6, our modelling is able to explain the large radius of CoRoT-2b if log(Q_p') <= 5.5 through a transient tidal circularization and corresponding planet tidal heating event. Under this model, the planet will reach its Roche limit within 20 Myr at most.
  • We measured the radii of 7 low and very low-mass stars using long baseline interferometry with the VLTI interferometer and its VINCI and AMBER near-infrared recombiners. We use these new data, together with literature measurements, to examine the luminosity- radius and mass-radius relations for K and M dwarfs. The precision of the new interferometric radii now competes with what can be obtained for double-lined eclipsing binaries. Interferometry provides access to much less active stars, as well as to stars with much better measured distances and luminosities, and therefore complements the information obtained from eclipsing systems. The radii of magnetically quiet late-K to M dwarfs match the predictions of stellar evolution models very well, providing direct confirmation that magnetic activity explains the discrepancy that was recently found for magnetically active eclipsing systems. The radii of the early K dwarfs are well reproduced for a mixing length parameter that approaches the solar value, as qualitatively expected.
  • We report the detection of two very eccentric planets orbiting HD4113 and HD156846 with the CORALIE Echelle spectrograph mounted on the 1.2-m Euler Swiss telescope at La Silla. The first planet, HD4113b, has minimum mass of $m\sin{i}=1.6\pm0.2 M_{\rm Jup}$, a period of $P=526.59\pm0.21$ days and an eccentricity of $e=0.903\pm0.02$. It orbits a metal rich G5V star at $a=1.28$ AU which displays an additional radial velocity drift of 28 m s$^{-1}$/yr observed during 8 years. The combination of the radial-velocity data and the non-detection of any main sequence stellar companion in our high contrast images taken at the VLT with NACO/SDI, characterizes the companion as a probable brown dwarf or as a faint white dwarf. The second planet, \object{HD 156846 b}, has minimum mass of $m\sin{i}=10.45\pm0.05$ M$_{\rm Jup}$, a period of $P=359.51\pm0.09 $ days, an eccentricity of $e=0.847\pm0.002$ and is located at $a=1.0$ AU from its parent star. HD156846 is a metal rich G0 dwarf and is also the primary of a wide binary system ($a>250$ AU, $P>4000$ years). Its stellar companion, \object{IDS 17147-1914 B}, is a M4 dwarf. The very high eccentricities of both planets can be explained by Kozai oscillations induced by the presence of a third object.
  • We present Spitzer Space Telescope infrared photometry of a secondary eclipse of the hot Neptune GJ436b. The observations were obtained using the 8-micron band of the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC). The data spanning the predicted time of secondary eclipse show a clear flux decrement with the expected shape and duration. The observed eclipse depth of 0.58 mmag allows us to estimate a blackbody brightness temperature of T_p = 717 +- 35 K at 8 microns. We compare this infrared flux measurement to a model of the planetary thermal emission, and show that this model reproduces properly the observed flux decrement. The timing of the secondary eclipse confirms the non-zero orbital eccentricity of the planet, while also increasing its precision (e = 0.14 +- 0.01). Additional new spectroscopic and photometric observations allow us to estimate the rotational period of the star and to assess the potential presence of another planet.