• Abridged - We quantify the effect of the galaxy group environment (for 12.5 < log(M_group/Msun) < 14.0) on the star formation rates of the (morphologically-selected) population of disk-dominated local Universe spiral galaxies (z < 0.13) with stellar masses log(M*/Msun) > 9.5. Within this population, we find that, while a small minority of group satellites are strongly quenched, the group centrals, and the large majority of satellites exhibit levels of SFR indistinguishable from ungrouped "field" galaxies of the same M*, albeit with a higher scatter, and for all M*. Modelling these results, we deduce that disk-dominated satellites continue to be characterized by a rapid cycling of gas into and out of their ISM at rates similar to those operating prior to infall, with the on-going fuelling likely sourced from the group intrahalo medium (IHM) on Mpc scales, rather than from the circum-galactic medium on 100kpc scales. Consequently, the color-density relation of the galaxy population as a whole would appear to be primarily due to a change in the mix of disk- and spheroid-dominated morphologies in the denser group environment compared to the field, rather than to a reduced propensity of the IHM in higher mass structures to cool and accrete onto galaxies. We also suggest that the inferred substantial accretion of IHM gas by satellite disk-dominated galaxies will lead to a progressive reduction in their specific angular momentum, thereby representing an efficient secular mechanism to transform morphology from star-forming disk-dominated types to more passive spheroid-dominated types.
  • Low surface brightness galaxies (LSBGs) represent a significant percentage of local galaxies but their formation and evolution remain elusive. They may hold crucial information for our understanding of many key issues (i.e., census of baryonic and dark matter, star formation in the low density regime, mass function). The most massive examples - the so called giant LSBGs - can be as massive as the Milky Way, but with this mass being distributed in a much larger disk. Malin 1 is an iconic giant LSBG, perhaps the largest disk galaxy known. We attempt to bring new insights on its structure and evolution on the basis of new images covering a wide range in wavelength. We have computed surface brightness profiles (and average surface brightnesses in 16 regions of interest), in six photometric bands (FUV, NUV, u, g, i, z). We compared these data to various models, testing a variety of assumptions concerning the formation and evolution of Malin 1. We find that the surface brightness and color profiles can be reproduced by a long and quiet star-formation history due to the low surface density; no significant event, such as a collision, is necessary. Such quiet star formation across the giant disk is obtained in a disk model calibrated for the Milky Way, but with an angular momentum approximately 20 times larger. Signs of small variations of the star-formation history are indicated by the diversity of ages found when different regions within the galaxy are intercompared.For the first time, panchromatic images of Malin 1 are used to constrain the stellar populations and the history of this iconic example among giant LSBGs. Based on our model, the extreme disk of Malin 1 is found to have a long history of relatively low star formation (about 2 Msun/yr). Our model allows us to make predictions on its stellar mass and metallicity.
  • The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey is one of the largest contemporary spectroscopic surveys of low-redshift galaxies. Covering an area of ~286 deg^2 (split among five survey regions) down to a limiting magnitude of r < 19.8 mag, we have collected spectra and reliable redshifts for 238,000 objects using the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. In addition, we have assembled imaging data from a number of independent surveys in order to generate photometry spanning the wavelength range 1 nm - 1 m. Here we report on the recently completed spectroscopic survey and present a series of diagnostics to assess its final state and the quality of the redshift data. We also describe a number of survey aspects and procedures, or updates thereof, including changes to the input catalogue, redshifting and re-redshifting, and the derivation of ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared photometry. Finally, we present the second public release of GAMA data. In this release we provide input catalogue and targeting information, spectra, redshifts, ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared photometry, single-component S\'ersic fits, stellar masses, H$\alpha$-derived star formation rates, environment information, and group properties for all galaxies with r < 19.0 mag in two of our survey regions, and for all galaxies with r < 19.4 mag in a third region (72,225 objects in total). The database serving these data is available at http://www.gama-survey.org/.
  • The Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) is a multiwavelength study of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) in the local universe. Here we present low resolution Spitzer spectra covering 5-38um and provide a basic analysis of the mid-IR spectral properties for nearby LIRGs. In a companion paper, we discuss detailed fits to the spectra. The GOALS sample of 244 nuclei in 180 luminous and 22 ultraluminous IR galaxies represents a complete subset of the IRAS RBGS and covers a range of merger stages, morphologies and spectral types. The majority (>60%) of GOALS LIRGs have high 6.2um PAH equivalent widths (EQW > 0.4um) and low levels of silicate absorption (s_9.7um >-1.0). There is a general trend among the U/LIRGs for silicate depth and MIR slope to increase with LIR. U/LIRGs in the late stages of a merger also have on average steeper MIR slopes and higher levels of dust obscuration. Together these trends suggest that as gas & dust is funneled towards the center of a coalescing merger, the nuclei become more compact and obscured. The sources that depart from these correlations have very low PAH EQW (EQW < 0.1um) consistent with their MIR emission being dominated by an AGN. The most heavily dust obscured sources are the most compact in their MIR emission, suggesting that the obscuring (cool) dust is associated with the outer regions of the starburst. As the merger progresses a marked decline is seen for the fraction of high EQW (star formation dominated) sources while the fraction of composite sources increases but the fraction of AGN-dominated sources remains low. When compared to the MIR spectra of submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) at z~2, the average GOALS LIRG is more absorbed at 9.7um and has more PAH emission. However, when the AGN contributions to both the local LIRGs and the high-z SMGs are removed, the average local starbursting LIRG closely resembles the starbursting SMGs.
  • We report the discovery of a well-defined correlation between B-band face-on central optical depth due to dust, \tau^f_B, and the stellar mass surface density, \mu_{*}, of nearby (z < 0.13) spiral galaxies: log(\tau^f_B) = 1.12(+-0.11)log(\mu_{*}/M_sol kpc^2)-8.6(+-0.8). This relation was derived from a sample of spiral galaxies taken from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey and detected in the FIR/submm in the Herschel-ATLAS survey. Using a quantitative analysis of the NUV attenuation-inclination relation for complete samples of GAMA spirals categorized according to \mu_{*} we demonstrate that this correlation can be used to statistically correct for dust attenuation purely on the basis of optical photometry and S'ersic-profile morphological fits. Considered together with previously established empirical relationships between stellar mass, metallicity and gas mass, the near linearity and high constant of proportionality of the \tau^f_B-\mu_{*} relation disfavors a stellar origin for the bulk of refractory grains in spiral galaxies, instead being consistent with the existence of a ubiquitous and very rapid mechanism for the growth of dust in the ISM. We use the \tau^f_B-\mu_{*} relation in conjunction with the radiation transfer model for spiral galaxies of Popescu & Tuffs (2011) to derive intrinsic scaling relations between specific star formation rate (sSFR), stellar mass, and \mu_{*}, in which the attenuation of the UV light used to measure the SFR is corrected on an object-to-object basis. A marked reduction in scatter in these relations is achieved which is demonstrably due to correction of both the inclination-dependent and face-on components of attenuation. Our results are consistent with a picture of spiral galaxies in which most of the submm emission originates from grains residing in translucent structures, exposed to UV in the diffuse interstellar radiation field.
  • We investigate the ultraviolet and optical properties and environment of low redshift galaxies detected in the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) science demonstration data. We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey seventh release and the Galaxy And Mass Assembly database to select galaxies with r_Petro < 19.0 mag in the redshift range 0.02 < z < 0.2 and look for their submillimeter counterparts in H-ATLAS. Our results show that at low redshift, H-ATLAS detects mainly blue/star-forming galaxies with a minor contribution from red systems which are highly obscured by dust. In addition we find that the colour of a galaxy rather than the local density of its environment determines whether it is detectable by H-ATLAS. The average dust temperature of galaxies that are simultaneously detected by both PACS and SPIRE is 25K \pm 4K, independent of environment. This analysis provides a glimpse of the potential of the H-ATLAS data to investigate the submillimeter properties of galaxies in the local universe.
  • An analysis of data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, Hubble Space Telescope, Chandra X-ray Observatory, and AKARI Infrared Astronomy Satellite is presented for the z=0.036 merging galaxy system II Zw 096 (CGCG 448-020). Because II Zw 096 has an infrared luminosity of log(L_IR/L_sun) = 11.94, it is classified as a Luminous Infrared Galaxy (LIRG), and was observed as part of the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). The Spitzer data suggest that 80% of the total infrared luminosity comes from an extremely compact, red source not associated with the nuclei of the merging galaxies. The Spitzer mid-infrared spectra indicate no high-ionization lines from a buried active galactic nucleus in this source. The strong detection of the 3.3 micron and 6.2 micron PAH emission features in the AKARI and Spitzer spectra also implies that the energy source of II Zw 096 is a starburst. Based on Spitzer infrared imaging and AKARI near-infrared spectroscopy, the star formation rate is estimated to be 120 M_sun/yr and > 45 M_sun/yr, respectively. Finally, the high-resolution B, I, and H-band images show many star clusters in the interacting system. The colors of these clusters suggest at least two populations - one with an age of 1-5 Myr and one with an age of 20-500 Myr, reddened by 0-2 magnitudes of visual extinction. The masses of these clusters span a range between 10^6-10^8 M_sun. This starburst source is reminiscent of the extra-nuclear starburst seen in NGC 4038/9 (the Antennae Galaxies) and Arp 299 but approximately an order of magnitude more luminous than the Antennae. The source is remarkable in that the off-nuclear infrared luminosity dominates the enitre system.
  • The Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) combines data from NASA's Spitzer, Chandra, Hubble and GALEX observatories, together with ground-based data into a comprehensive imaging and spectroscopic survey of over 200 low redshift Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs). The LIRGs are a complete subset of the IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample (RBGS). The LIRGs targeted in GOALS span the full range of nuclear spectral types defined via traditional optical line-ratio diagrams as well as interaction stages. They provide an unbiased picture of the processes responsible for enhanced infrared emission in galaxies in the local Universe. As an example of the analytic power of the multi-wavelength GOALS dataset, we present data for the interacting system VV 340 (IRAS F14547+2449). Between 80-95% of the total far-infrared emission (or about 5E11 solar luminosities) originates in VV 340 North. While the IRAC colors of VV 340 North and South are consistent with star-forming galaxies, both the Spitzer IRS and Chandra ACIS data indicate the presence of a buried AGN in VV 340 North. The GALEX far and near-UV fluxes imply a extremely large infrared "excess" (IRX) for the system (IR/FUV = 81) which is well above the correlation seen in starburst galaxies. Most of this excess is driven by VV 340 N, which alone has an IR excess of nearly 400. The VV 340 system seems to be comprised of two very different galaxies - an infrared luminous edge-on galaxy (VV 340 North) that dominates the long-wavelength emission from the system and which hosts a buried AGN, and a face-on starburst (VV 340 South) that dominates the short-wavelength emission.
  • We study the ultraviolet to far-infrared (hereafter UV-to-IR) SEDs of a sample of intermediate redshift (0.2 < z < 0.7) UV-selected galaxies from the ELAIS-N1 and ELAIS-N2 fields by fitting a multi-wavelength dataset to a library of GRASIL templates. Star formation related properties of the galaxies are derived from the library of models by using the Bayesian statistics. We find a decreasing presence of galaxies with low attenuation and low total luminosity as redshift decreases, which does not hold for high total luminosity galaxies. In addition the dust attenuation of low mass galaxies increases as redshift decreases, and this trend seems to disappear for galaxies with M* > 10^11 M_sun. This result is consistent with a mass dependent evolution of the dust to gas ratio, which could be driven by a mass dependent efficiency of star formation in star forming galaxies. The specific star formation rates (SSFR) decrease with increasing stellar mass at all redshifts, and for a given stellar mass the SSFR decreases with decreasing redshift. The differences in the slope of the M*--SSFR relation found between this work and others at similar redshift could be explained by the adopted selection criteria of the samples which, for a UV selected sample, favours blue, star forming galaxies.
  • We present extensive ugrizYHJK photometry and optical spectroscopy of SN 2005gj obtained by the SDSS-II and CSP Supernova Projects, which give excellent coverage during the first 150 days after the time of explosion. These data show that SN 2005gj is the second clear case, after SN 2002ic, of a thermonuclear explosion in a dense circumstellar environment. Both the presence of singly and doubly ionized iron-peak elements (FeIII and weak SII, SiII) near maximum light as well as the spectral evolution show that SN 2002ic-like events are Type Ia explosions. Independent evidence comes from the exponential decay in luminosity of SN 2005gj, pointing to an exponential density distribution of the ejecta. The interaction of the supernova ejecta with the dense circumstellar medium is stronger than in SN 2002ic: (1) the supernova lines are weaker; (2) the Balmer emission lines are more luminous; and (3) the bolometric luminosity is higher close to maximum light. The velocity evolution of the Halpha components suggest that the CSM around SN 2005gj is clumpy and it has a flatter density distribution compared with the steady wind solution, in agreement with SN 2002ic. An early X-ray observation with Chandra gives an upper-limit on the mass loss rate from the companion of < 2x10^{-4} Msun/yr.
  • The ultraviolet-to-radio continuum spectral energy distributions are presented for all 75 galaxies in the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS). A principal component analysis of the sample shows that most of the sample's spectral variations stem from two underlying components, one representative of a galaxy with a low infrared-to-ultraviolet ratio and one representative of a galaxy with a high infrared-to-ultraviolet ratio. The influence of several parameters on the infrared-to-ultraviolet ratio is studied (e.g., optical morphology, disk inclination, far-infrared color, ultraviolet spectral slope, and star formation history). Consistent with our understanding of normal star-forming galaxies, the SINGS sample of galaxies in comparison to more actively star-forming galaxies exhibits a larger dispersion in the infrared-to-ultraviolet versus ultraviolet spectral slope correlation. Early type galaxies, exhibiting low star formation rates and high optical surface brightnesses, have the most discrepant infrared-to-ultraviolet correlation. These results suggest that the star formation history may be the dominant regulator of the broadband spectral variations between galaxies. Finally, a new discovery shows that the 24 micron morphology can be a useful tool for parametrizing the global dust temperature and ultraviolet extinction in nearby galaxies. The dust emission in dwarf/irregular galaxies is clumpy and warm accompanied by low ultraviolet extinction, while in spiral galaxies there is typically a much larger diffuse component of cooler dust and average ultraviolet extinction. For galaxies with nuclear 24 micron emission, the dust temperature and ultraviolet extinction are relatively high compared to disk galaxies.
  • This work presents the main ultraviolet (UV) and far-infrared (FIR) properties of two samples of nearby galaxies selected from the GALEX ($\lambda = 2315$\AA, hereafter NUV) and IRAS ($\lambda = 60\mu$m) surveys respectively. They are built in order to get detection at both wavelengths for most of the galaxies. Star formation rate (SFR) estimators based on the UV and FIR emissions are compared. Systematic differences are found between the SFR estimators for individual galaxies based on the NUV fluxes corrected for dust attenuation and on the total IR luminosity. A combined estimator based on NUV and IR luminosities seems to be the best proxy over the whole range of values of SFR. Although both samples present similar average values of the birthrate parameter b, their star-formation-related properties are substantially different: NUV-selected galaxies tend to show larger values of $b$ for lower masses, SFRs and dust attenuations, supporting previous scenarios for the star formation history (SFH). Conversely, about 20% of the FIR-selected galaxies show high values of $b$, SFR and NUV attenuation. These galaxies, most of them being LIRGs and ULIRGs, break down the downsizing picture for the SFH, however their relative contribution per unit volume is small in the local Universe. Finally, the cosmic SFR density of the local Universe is estimated in a consistent way from the NUV and IR luminosities.
  • (Abridged) Far ultraviolet to far infrared images of the nearby galaxy NGC5194, from Spitzer, GALEX, Hubble Space Telescope and ground--based data, are used to investigate local and global star formation, and the impact of dust extinction in HII-emitting knots. In the IR/UV-UV color plane, the NGC5194 HII knots show the same trend observed for normal star-forming galaxies, having a much larger dispersion than starburst galaxies. We identify the dispersion as due to the UV emission predominantly tracing the evolved, non-ionizing stellar population, up to ages 50-100 Myr. While in starbursts the UV light traces the current SFR, in NGC5194 it traces a combination of current and recent-past SFR. Unlike the UV emission, the monochromatic 24 micron luminosity is an accurate local SFR tracer for the HII knots in NGC5194; this suggests that the 24 micron emission carriers are mainly heated by the young, ionizing stars. However, preliminary results show that the ratio of the 24 micron emission to the SFR varies by a factor of a few from galaxy to galaxy. While also correlated with star formation, the 8 micron emission is not directly proportional to the number of ionizing photons. This confirms earlier suggestions that the carriers of the 8 micron emission are heated by more than one mechanism.
  • The ELAIS S1 field was observed by GALEX in both its Wide Spectroscopic and Deep Imaging Survey modes. This field was previously observed by the Infrared Space Observatory and we made use of the catalogue of multi-wavelength data published by the ELAIS consortium to select galaxies common to the two samples. Among the 959 objects with GALEX spectroscopy, 88 are present in the ELAIS catalog and 19 are galaxies with an optical spectroscopic redshift. The distribution of redshifts covers the range $0<z<1.6$. The selected galaxies have bolometric IR luminosities $10<Log(L_{IR})<13$ (deduced from the $15 \mu m$ flux using ISOCAM) which means that we cover a wide range of galaxies from normal to Ultra Luminous IR Galaxies. The mean ($\sigma$) UV luminosity (not corrected for extinction) amounts to $Log(\lambda.L_{1530}) = 9.8 (0.6)$ $L_\sun$ for the low-z ($z \le 0.35$) sample. The UV slope $\beta$ (assuming $f_\lambda \propto \lambda^\beta$) correlates with the GALEX FUV-NUV color if the sample is restricted to galaxies below $z < 0.1$. Taking advantage of the UV and IR data, we estimate the dust attenuation from the IR/UV ratio and compare it to the UV slope $\beta$. We find that it is not possible to uniquely estimate the dust attenuation from $\beta$ for our sample of galaxies. These galaxies are highly extinguished with a median value $A_{FUV} = 2.7 \pm 0.8$. Once the dust correction applied, the UV- and IR-based SFRs correlate. For the closest galaxy with the best quality spectrum, we see a feature consistent with being produced by a bump near 220nm in the attenuation curve.
  • We use the far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) images of M83 obtained by GALEX to compute the radial profile of the UV spectral slope in the star forming disk. We briefly present a model of its chemical evolution which allows us to obtain realistic intrinsic properties of the stellar populations. Using corollary data, we also compute the profiles of H-alpha/H-beta and of the total IR (TIR) to FUV ratio. Both data and model are used to estimate and compare the extinction gradients at the FUV wavelength obtained from these various indicators. We discuss the implications for the determination of the star formation rate.
  • The total ultraviolet (UV) flux (from 1412 to 2718 AA) of M 101 is compared on a pixel-to-pixel basis with the total far-infrared (FIR) flux (from 60 to 170 micron), using the maps of the galaxy taken by GALEX in the near-UV and far-UV and by ISOPHOT at 60, 100 and 170 micron. The main result of this investigation is the discovery of a tight dependence of the FIR/UV ratio on radius, with values monotonically decreasing from around 4 in the nuclear region to nearly zero towards the edge of the optical disk. Although the tightness of this dependence is in part attributable to resolution effects, the result is consistent with the presence of a large-scale distribution of diffuse dust having a face-on optical depth which decreases with radius and which dominates over the more localized variations in opacity between the arm and interarm regions. We also find a trend for the FIR/UV ratio to take on higher values in the regions of diffuse interarm emission than in the spiral-arm regions, at a given radius. This is interpreted quantitatively in terms of the escape probability of UV photons from spiral arms and their subsequent scattering in the interarm regions, and in terms of the larger relative contribution of optical photons to the heating of the dust in the interarm regions.
  • We compare the dust attenuation properties of two samples of galaxies purely selected in the near-ultraviolet (NUV) band (1750-2750 A, lambda_m = 2310 A) and in the far-infrared (FIR) at 60micron. These samples are built using the GALEX and IRAS sky surveys over ~600 square degrees. The NUV selected sample contains 95 galaxies detected down to NUV=16mag (AB system). 83 galaxies in this sample are spirals or irregulars and only two of them are not detected at 60micron. The FIR selected sample is built from the IRAS PSCz catalog complete down to 0.6Jy. Among the 163 sources, we select 118 star forming galaxies well measured by IRAS, all but 1 are detected in NUV and 14 galaxies are not detected in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) band (1350-1750 A, lambda_m = 1530 A). The dust to ultraviolet (NUV and FUV) flux ratio is calibrated to estimate the dust attenuation at both wavelengths. The median value of the attenuation in NUV is found to be ~1 mag for the NUV selected sample versus ~2 mag for the FIR selected one. Within both samples, the dust attenuation is found to correlate with the luminosity of the galaxies. Almost all the NUV selected galaxies and 2/3 of the FIR selected sample exhibit a lower dust attenuation than that expected from the tight relation found previously for starburst galaxies between the dust attenuation and the slope of the ultraviolet continuum. The situation is inverse for one third of the FIR selected galaxies: their extinction is higher than that deduced from their FUV-NUV color and the relation valid for starbursts.
  • We derive a variety of physical parameters including star formation rates (SFRs), dust attenuation and burst mass fractions for 6472 galaxies observed by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) and present in the SDSS DR1 main spectroscopic sample. Parameters are estimated in a statistical way by comparing each observed broad-band SED (two GALEX and five SDSS bands) with an extensive library of model galaxy SEDs, which cover a wide range of star formation histories and include stochastic starbursts. We compare the constraints derived using SDSS bands only with those derived using the combination of SDSS and GALEX photometry. We find that the addition of the GALEX bands leads to significant improvement in the estimation of both the dust optical depth and the star formation rate over timescales of 100 Myr to 1 Gyr in a galaxy. We are sensitive to SFRs as low as 10^{-3} M_sun/yr, and we find that low levels of star formation (SF) are mostly associated with early-type, red galaxies. The least massive galaxies have ratios of current to past-averaged SF rates (b-parameter) consistent with constant SF over a Hubble time. For late-type galaxies, this ratio on average decreases with mass. We find that b correlates tightly with NUV-r color, implying that the SF history of a galaxy can be constrained on the basis of the NUV-r color alone. The fraction of galaxies that have undergone a significant starburst episode within the last 1 Gyr steeply declines with mass-from ~20% for galaxies with ~10^8 M_sun to ~5% for ~10^11 M_sun galaxies.
  • We present ultraviolet photometry for a sample of morphologically early-type galaxies selected by matching the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 1 with the GALEX Medium and All-sky Imaging Surveys. We obtain a working sample of 1032 early-type galaxies with GALEX FUV detections, SDSS spectroscopy, and $z<0.2$. Using the SDSS spectra to identify galaxies with even weak star formation or evidence of AGN, and further removing galaxies with any evidence of non early-type morphology, we derive a final sample of 172 red quiescent early-type galaxies. We find that the $FUV-r$ color has a full range of 5 mag. Plotting against the $FUV-r$ color the metallicity sensitive Lick $\rm Mg_2$ and D4000 indices, and the stellar velocity dispersion, we find no correlation between our measurement of UV rising flux, and any parameter sensitive to metallicity.
  • M32, the compact elliptical-galaxy companion to the Andromeda spiral galaxy has been imaged by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) in two ultraviolet bands, centered at ~1500 (FUV) and 2300 Angstroms (NUV). The imaging data have been carefully decomposed so as to properly account for the complicated background contamination from the disk of M31. We have derived the surface brightness and color profiles finding a slightly positive color gradient of Delta(FUV-B)/Delta log(r)=+0.15+/-0.03 within one effective radius. Earlier data from the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope suggested that M32 had an extremely large (negative) FUV-optical color gradient (Delta(FUV-B)/Delta log(r)<-2), inverted with respect to the majority of gradients seen in giant elliptical galaxies. Our new results show that, despite of its very low UV-upturn, M32 has similar UV properties to those observed in luminous elliptical galaxies.
  • The NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) satellite has obtained simultaneous near and far ultraviolet light curves of the ROTSE-I Catalog RR Lyrae ab-type variable star J143753.84+345924.8. A series of 38 GALEX Deep Imaging Survey observations well distributed in phase within the star's 0.56432d period shows an AB=4.9mag variation in the far UV (1350-1750A) band and an AB=1.8mag variation in the near UV (1750-2750A) band, compared with only a 0.8mag variation in the broad, unfiltered ROTSE-I (4500-10000A) band. These GALEX UV observations are the first to reveal a large RR Lyrae amplitude variation at wavelengths below 1800A. We compare the GALEX and ROTSE-I observations to predictions made by recent Kurucz stellar atmosphere models. We use published physical parameters for the comparable period (0.57433d), well-observed RR Lyrae star WY Antliae to compute predicted FUV, NUV, and ROTSE-I light curves for J143753.84+345924.8. The observed light curves agree with the Kurucz predictions for [Fe/H]=-1.25 to within AB=0.2mag in the GALEX NUV and ROTSE-I bands, and within 0.5mag in the FUV. At all metallicities between solar and one hundredth solar, the Kurucz models predict 6-8mag of variation at wavelengths between 1000-1700A. Other variable stars with similar temperature variations, such as Cepheids, should also have large-amplitude FUV light curves, observable during the ongoing GALEX imaging surveys.
  • We present Halpha rotation curves for a sample of 15 dwarf and LSB galaxies. From these, we derive limits on the slopes of the central mass distributions. Assuming the density distributions of dark matter halos follow a power-law at small radii, rho(r)~r^(-alpha), we find inner slopes in the range 0<alpha<1 for most galaxies. In general, halos with constant density cores (\alpha=0) provide somewhat better fits, but the majority of our galaxies (~75%) are also consistent with alpha=1, provided that the R-band mass-to-light ratios are smaller than about 2. Halos with alpha=1.5, however, are ruled out in virtually every case. To investigate the robustness of these results we discuss and model several possible causes of systematic errors including non-circular motions, slit width, seeing, and slit alignment errors. Taking the associated uncertainties into account, we conclude that even for the 25% of the cases where alpha=1 seems inconsistent with the rotation curves, we cannot rule out cusp slopes this steep. Inclusion of literature samples similar to the one presented here leads to the same conclusion when possible systematic errors are taken into account. In the ongoing debate on whether the rotation curves of dwarf and LSB galaxies are consistent with predictions for a CDM universe, we argue that our sample and the literature samples discussed in this paper provide insufficient evidence to rule out halos with alpha=1. At the same time, we note that none of the galaxies in these samples require halos with steep cusps, as most are equally well or better explained by constant density cores. (abridged)
  • High resolution Halpha rotation curves are presented for five low surface brightness galaxies. These Halpha rotation curves have shapes different from those previously derived from HI observations, probably because of the higher spatial resolution of the Halpha observations. The Halpha rotation curves rise more steeply in the inner parts than the HI rotation curves and reach a flat part beyond about two disk scale lengths. With radii expressed in optical disk scale lengths, the rotation curves of the low surface brightness galaxies presented here and those of HSB galaxies have almost identical shapes. Mass modeling shows that the contribution of the stellar component to the rotation curves may be scaled to explain most of the inner parts of the rotation curves, albeit with high stellar mass-to-light ratios. On the other hand, well fitting mass models can also be obtained with lower contributions of the stellar disk. These observations suggest that the luminous mass density and the total mass density are coupled in the inner parts of these galaxies.
  • We report on the discovery of Cepheids in the Virgo spiral galaxy NGC 4535, based on observations made with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope. NGC 4535 is one of 18 galaxies observed as a part of The HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale which aims to measure the Hubble constant to 10% accuracy. NGC 4535 was observed over 13 epochs using the F555W filter, and over 9 epochs using the F814W filter. The HST F555W and F814W data were transformed to the Johnson V and Kron-Cousins I magnitude systems, respectively. Photometry was performed using two independent programs, DoPHOT and DAOPHOT II/ALLFRAME. Period-luminosity relations in the V and I bands were constructed using 39 high-quality Cepheids present in our set of 50 variable candidates. We obtain a distance modulus of 31.02+/-0.26 mag, corresponding to a distance of 16.0+/-1.9 Mpc. Our distance estimate is based on values of mu = 18.50 +/- 0.10 mag and E(V-I) = 0.13 mag for the distance modulus and reddening of the LMC, respectively.