• We present the discovery of NGTS-3Ab, a hot Jupiter found transiting the primary star of an unresolved binary system. We develop a joint analysis of multi-colour photometry, centroids, radial velocity (RV) cross-correlation function (CCF) profiles and their bisector inverse slopes (BIS) to disentangle this three-body system. Data from the Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS), SPECULOOS and HARPS are analysed and modelled with our new blendfitter software. We find that the binary consists of NGTS-3A (G6V-dwarf) and NGTS-3B (K1V-dwarf) at <1 arcsec separation. NGTS-3Ab orbits every P = 1.675 days. The planet radius and mass are R_planet = 1.48+-0.37 R_J and M_planet = 2.38+-0.26 M_J, suggesting it is potentially inflated. We emphasise that only combining all the information from multi-colour photometry, centroids and RV CCF profiles can resolve systems like NGTS-3. Such systems cannot be disentangled from single-colour photometry and RV measurements alone. Importantly, the presence of a BIS correlation indicates a blend scenario, but is not sufficient to determine which star is orbited by the third body. Moreover, even if no BIS correlation is detected, a blend scenario cannot be ruled out without further information. The choice of methodology for calculating the BIS can influence the measured significance of its correlation. The presented findings are crucial to consider for wide-field transit surveys, which require wide CCD pixels (>5 arcsec) and are prone to contamination by blended objects. With TESS on the horizon, it is pivotal for the candidate vetting to incorporate all available follow-up information from multi-colour photometry and RV CCF profiles.
  • We present the results of a multisite photometric observing campaign on the rapidly oscillating Ap (roAp) star 2MASS 16400299-0737293 (J1640; $V=12.7$). We analyse photometric $B$ data to show the star pulsates at a frequency of $151.93$ d$^{-1}$ ($1758.45 \mu$Hz; $P=9.5$ min) with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 20.68 mmag, making it one of the highest amplitude roAp stars. No further pulsation modes are detected. The stellar rotation period is measured at $3.6747\pm0.0005$ d, and we show that rotational modulation due to spots is in anti-phase between broadband and $B$ observations. Analysis and modelling of the pulsation reveals this star to be pulsating in a distorted quadrupole mode, but with a strong spherically symmetric component. The pulsational phase variation in this star is suppressed, leading to the conclusion that the contribution of $\ell>2$ components dictate the shape of phase variations in roAp stars that pulsate in quadrupole modes. This is only the fourth time such a strong pulsation phase suppression has been observed, leading us to question the mechanisms at work in these stars. We classify J1640 as an A7 Vp SrEu(Cr) star through analysis of classification resolution spectra.
  • We present a new analysis of the rapidly oscillating Ap (roAp) star, 2MASS J$19400781-4420093$ (J1940; $V=13.1$). The star was discovered using SuperWASP broadband photometry to have a frequency of 176.39 d$^{-1}$ (2041.55 $\mu$Hz; $P = 8.2$ min; Holdsworth et al. 2014a) and is shown here to have a peak-to-peak amplitude of 34 mmag. J1940 has been observed during three seasons at the South African Astronomical Observatory, and has been the target of a Whole Earth Telescope campaign. The observations reveal that J1940 pulsates in a distorted quadrupole mode with unusual pulsational phase variations. A higher signal-to-noise ratio spectrum has been obtained since J1940's first announcement, which allows us to classify the star as A7 Vp Eu(Cr). The observing campaigns presented here reveal no pulsations other than the initially detected frequency. We model the pulsation in J1940 and conclude that the pulsation is distorted by a magnetic field of strength $1.5$ kG. A difference in the times of rotational maximum light and pulsation maximum suggests a significant offset between the spots and pulsation axis, as can be seen in roAp stars.
  • We present 2271 radial velocity measurements taken on 118 single-line binary stars, taken over eight years with the CORALIE spectrograph. The binaries consist of F/G/K primaries and M-dwarf secondaries. They were initially discovered photometrically by the WASP planet survey, as their shallow eclipses mimic a hot-Jupiter transit. The observations we present permit a precise characterisation of the binary orbital elements and mass function. With modelling of the primary star this mass function is converted to a mass of the secondary star. In the future, this spectroscopic work will be combined with precise photometric eclipses to draw an empirical mass/radius relation for the bottom of the mass sequence. This has applications in both stellar astrophysics and the growing number of exoplanet surveys around M-dwarfs. In particular, we have discovered 34 systems with a secondary mass below $0.2 M_\odot$, and so we will ultimately double the known number of very low-mass stars with well characterised mass and radii. We are able to detect eccentricities as small as 0.001 and orbital periods to sub-second precision. Our sample can revisit some earlier work on the tidal evolution of close binaries, extending it to low mass ratios. We find some binaries that are eccentric at orbital periods < 3 days, while our longest circular orbit has a period of 10.4 days. By collating the EBLM binaries with published WASP planets and brown dwarfs, we derive a mass spectrum with twice the resolution of previous work. We compare the WASP/EBLM sample of tightly-bound orbits with work in the literature on more distant companions up to 10 AU. We note that the brown dwarf desert appears wider, as it carves into the planetary domain for our short-period orbits. This would mean that a significantly reduced abundance of planets begins at $\sim 3M_{\rm Jup}$, well before the Deuterium-burning limit. [abridged]
  • We set out to compile a catalogue of RRab pulsating variables in the SuperWASP archive and identify candidate Blazhko effect objects within this catalogue. We analysed their light curves and power spectra for correlations in their common characteristics to further our understanding of the phenomenon. Pulsation periods were found for each SWASP RRab object using PDM techniques. Low frequency periodic signals detected in the CLEAN power spectra of RRab stars were matched with modulation sidebands and combined with pairs of sidebands to produce a list of candidate Blazhko periods. A novel technique was used in an attempt to identify Blazhko effect stars by comparing scatter at different parts of the folded light curve. Pulsation amplitudes were calculated based on phase folded light curves. The SuperWASP RRab catalogue consists of 4963 objects of which 3397 are previously unknown. We discovered 983 distinct candidates for Blazhko effect objects, 613 of these being previously unknown in the literature as RR Lyrae stars, and 894 are previously unknown to be Blazhko effect stars. Correlations were investigated between the scatter of points on the light curve, the periods and amplitudes of the objects' pulsations, and those of the Blazhko effect. A statistical analysis has been performed on a large population of Blazhko effect stars from the wide-field SuperWASP survey. No correlations were found between the Blazhko period and other parameters including the Blazhko amplitude, although we confirmed a lower rate of occurrence of the Blazhko effect in long pulsation period objects.
  • We report the discovery of an eclipsing binary system with mass-ratio q $\sim$ 0.07. After identifying a periodic photometric signal received by WASP, we obtained CORALIE spectroscopic radial velocities and follow-up light curves with the Euler and TRAPPIST telescopes. From a joint fit of these data we determine that EBLM J0555-57 consists of a sun-like primary star that is eclipsed by a low-mass companion, on a weakly eccentric 7.8-day orbit. Using a mass estimate for the primary star derived from stellar models, we determine a companion mass of $85 \pm 4 M_{\rm Jup}$ ($0.081M_{\odot}$) and a radius of $0.84^{+0.14}_{-0.04} R_{\rm Jup}$ ($0.084 R_{\odot}$) that is comparable to that of Saturn. EBLM J0555-57Ab has a surface gravity $\log g_\mathrm{2} = 5.50^{+0.03}_{-0.13}$ and is one of the densest non-stellar-remnant objects currently known. These measurements are consistent with models of low-mass stars.
  • The use of high resolution, high signal-to-noise stellar spectra is essential in order to determine the most accurate and precise stellar atmospheric parameters via spectroscopy. This is particularly important for determining the fundamental parameters of exoplanets, which directly depend on the stellar properties. However, different techniques can be implemented when analysing these spectra which will influence the results. These include performing an abundance analysis relative to the solar values in order to negate uncertainties in atomic data, and fixing the surface gravity (log g) to an external value such as those from asteroseismology. The choice of lines used will also influence the results. In this paper, we investigate differential analysis and fixing log g for a set of FGK stars that already have accurate fundamental parameters known from external methods. We find that a differential line list gives slightly more accurate parameters compared to a laboratory line list, however the laboratory line list still gives robust parameters. We also find that fixing the log g does not improve the spectroscopic parameters. We investigate the effects of line selection on the stellar parameters and find that the choice of lines used can have a significant effect on the parameters. In particular, removal of certain low excitation potential lines can change the Teff by up to 50 K. For future HoSTS papers we will use the differential line list with a solar microturbulence value of 1 km/s, and we will not fix the log g to an external value.
  • We present an analysis of three new pulsating subdwarf B stars discovered in the SuperWASP archive. Two of the stars, J1938+5609 and J0902-0720, are p-mode pulsators; J1938+5609 shows a pulsation at 231.62 d$^{-1}$ ($P=373$ s; 2681 $\mu$Hz) with an amplitude of 4 mmag, whereas J0902-0720 pulsates at frequencies 636.74 d$^{-1}$ ($P=136$ s; 7370 $\mu$Hz) and 615.34 d$^{-1}$ ($P=140$ s; 7122 $\mu$Hz), with amplitudes 7.27 and 1.53 mmag, respectively. The third star, J2344-3427, is a hybrid pulsator with a p-mode frequency at 223.16 d$^{-1}$ ($P=387$ s; 2583 $\mu$Hz) and a corresponding amplitude of 1.5 mmag, and g modes in the frequency range $8.68-28.56$ d$^{-1}$ ($P=3025-9954$ s; $100-331$ $\mu$Hz) and amplitudes between 0.76 and 1.17 mmag. Spectroscopic results place J1938+5609 and J2344-3427 among the long-period or hybrid pulsators, suggesting there may be further modes in these stars below our detection limits, with J0902-0720 placed firmly amongst the p-mode pulsators.
  • We report the detection of two new systems containing transiting planets. Both were identified by WASP as worthy transiting planet candidates. Radial-velocity observations quickly verified that the photometric signals were indeed produced by two transiting hot Jupiters. Our observations also show the presence of additional Doppler signals. In addition to short-period hot Jupiters, we find that the WASP-53 and WASP-81 systems also host brown dwarfs, on fairly eccentric orbits with semi-major axes of a few astronomical units. WASP-53c is over 16 $M_{\rm Jup} \sin i_{\rm c}$ and WASP-81c is 57 $M_{\rm Jup} \sin i_{\rm c}$. The presence of these tight, massive companions restricts theories of how the inner planets were assembled. We propose two alternative interpretations: a formation of the hot Jupiters within the snow line, or the late dynamical arrival of the brown dwarfs after disc-dispersal. We also attempted to measure the Rossiter--McLaughlin effect for both hot Jupiters. In the case of WASP-81b we fail to detect a signal. For WASP-53b we find that the planet is aligned with respect to the stellar spin axis. In addition we explore the prospect of transit timing variations, and of using Gaia's astrometry to measure the true masses of both brown dwarfs and also their relative inclination with respect to the inner transiting hot Jupiters.
  • We announce the discovery that WASP-20 is a binary stellar system, consisting of two components separated by $0.2578\pm0.0007^{\prime\prime}$ on the sky, with a flux ratio of $0.4639\pm 0.0015$ in the $K$-band. It has previously been assumed that the system consists of a single F9 V star, with photometric and radial velocity signals consistent with a low-density transiting giant planet. With a projected separation of approximately $60$ au between the two components, the detected planetary signals almost certainly originate from the brighter of the two stars. We reanalyse previous observations allowing for two scenarios, `planet transits A' and `planet transits B', finding that both cases remain consistent with a transiting gas giant. However, we rule out the `planet transits B' scenario because the observed transit duration requires star B to be significantly evolved, and therefore have an age much greater than star A. We outline further observations which can be used to confirm this finding. Our preferred `planet transits A' scenario results in the measured mass and radius of the planet increasing by 4$\sigma$ and 1$\sigma$, respectively.
  • We present an analysis of the first Kepler K2 mission observations of a rapidly oscillating Ap (roAp) star, HD 24355 ($V=9.65$). The star was discovered in SuperWASP broadband photometry with a frequency of 224.31 d$^{-1}$, (2596.18 $\mu$Hz; $P = 6.4$ min) and an amplitude of 1.51 mmag, with later spectroscopic analysis of low-resolution spectra showing HD 24355 to be an A5 Vp SrEu star. The high precision K2 data allow us to identify 13 rotationally split sidelobes to the main pulsation frequency of HD 24355. This number of sidelobes combined with an unusual rotational phase variation show this star to be the most distorted quadrupole roAp pulsator yet observed. In modelling this star, we are able to reproduce well the amplitude modulation of the pulsation, and find a close match to the unusual phase variations. We show this star to have a pulsation frequency higher than the critical cut-off frequency. This is currently the only roAp star observed with the Kepler spacecraft in Short Cadence mode that has a photometric amplitude detectable from the ground, thus allowing comparison between the mmag amplitude ground-based targets and the $\mu$mag spaced-based discoveries. No further pulsation modes are identified in the K2 data, showing this star to be a single-mode pulsator.
  • WASP-80b is a missing link in the study of exo-atmospheres. It falls between the warm Neptunes and the hot Jupiters and is amenable for characterisation, thanks to its host star's properties. We observed the planet through transit and during occultation with Warm Spitzer. Combining our mid-infrared transits with optical time series, we find that the planet presents a transmission spectrum indistinguishable from a horizontal line. In emission, WASP-80b is the intrinsically faintest planet whose dayside flux has been detected in both the 3.6 and 4.5 $\mu$m Spitzer channels. The depths of the occultations reveal that WASP-80b is as bright and as red as a T4 dwarf, but that its temperature is cooler. If planets go through the equivalent of an L-T transition, our results would imply this happens at cooler temperatures than for brown dwarfs. Placing WASP-80b's dayside into a colour-magnitude diagram, it falls exactly at the junction between a blackbody model and the T-dwarf sequence; we cannot discern which of those two interpretations is the more likely. Flux measurements on other planets with similar equilibrium temperatures are required to establish whether irradiated gas giants, like brown dwarfs, transition between two spectral classes. An eventual detection of methane absorption in transmission would also help lift that degeneracy. We obtained a second series of high-resolution spectra during transit, using HARPS. We reanalyse the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. The data now favour an aligned orbital solution and a stellar rotation nearly three times slower than stellar line broadening implies. A contribution to stellar line broadening, maybe macroturbulence, is likely to have been underestimated for cool stars, whose rotations have therefore been systematically overestimated. [abridged]
  • We identify stars in the $\delta$ Sct instability strip that do not pulsate in p modes at the 50-$\mu$mag limit, using Kepler data. Spectral classification and abundance analyses from high-resolution spectroscopy allow us to identify chemically peculiar stars, in which the absence of pulsations is not surprising. The remaining stars are chemically normal, yet they are not $\delta$ Sct stars. Their lack of observed p modes cannot be explained through any known mechanism. However, they are mostly distributed around the edges of the $\delta$ Sct instability strip, which allows for the possibility that they actually lie outside the strip once the uncertainties are taken into account. We investigated the possibility that the non-pulsators inside the instability strip could be unresolved binary systems, having components that both lie outside the instability strip. If misinterpreted as single stars, we found that such binaries could generate temperature discrepancies of $\sim$300 K -- larger than the spectroscopic uncertainties, and fully consistent with the observations. After these considerations, there remains one chemically normal non-pulsator that lies in the middle of the instability strip. This star is a challenge to pulsation theory. However, its existence as the only known star of its kind indicates that such stars are rare. We conclude that the $\delta$ Sct instability strip is pure, unless pulsation is shut down by diffusion or another mechanism, which could be interaction with a binary companion.
  • The Rossiter-McLaughlin effect observed for transiting exoplanets often requires prior knowledge of the stellar projected equatorial rotational velocity. This is usually provided by measuring the broadening of spectral lines, however this method has uncertainties as lines are also broadened by velocity fields in the stellar photosphere known as macroturbulence. We have estimated accurate rotational velocity values from asteroseismic analyses of main sequence stars observed by Kepler. The rotational frequency splittings of the detected solar-like oscillations of these stars are determined largely by the near-surface rotation. These estimates have been used to infer the macroturbulence values for 28 Kepler stars. Out of this sample, 26 stars were used along with the Sun to obtain a new calibration between macroturbulence, effective temperature and surface gravity. The new calibration is valid for the temperature range 5200 to 6400 K and the gravity range 4.0 to 4.6 dex. A comparison is also provided with previous macroturbulence calibrations. As a result of this work, macroturbulence, and thus rotational velocity, can now be determined with confidence for stars that do not have asteroseismic data available. We present new spectroscopic rotational velocity values for the WASP planet host stars, using high resolution HARPS spectra.
  • Colour-magnitude diagrams form a traditional way of presenting luminous objects in the Universe and compare them to each others. Here, we estimate the photometric distance of 44 transiting exoplanetary systems. Parallaxes for seven systems confirm our methodology. Combining those measurements with fluxes obtained while planets were occulted by their host stars, we compose colour-magnitude diagrams in the near and mid-infrared. When possible, planets are plotted alongside very low-mass stars and field brown dwarfs, who often share similar sizes and equilibrium temperatures. They offer a natural, empirical, comparison sample. We also include directly imaged exoplanets and the expected loci of pure blackbodies. Irradiated planets do not match blackbodies; their emission spectra are not featureless. For a given luminosity, hot Jupiters' daysides show a larger variety in colour than brown dwarfs do and display an increasing diversity in colour with decreasing intrinsic luminosity. The presence of an extra absorbent within the 4.5 $\mu$m band would reconcile outlying hot Jupiters with ultra-cool dwarfs' atmospheres. Measuring the emission of gas giants cooler than 1000 K would disentangle whether planets' atmospheres behave more similarly to brown dwarfs' atmospheres than to blackbodies, whether they are akin to the young directly imaged planets, or if irradiated gas giants form their own sequence.
  • We analyse the fifth roAp star reported in the Kepler field, KIC 7582608, discovered with the SuperWASP project. The object shows a high frequency pulsation at 181.7324 d$^{-1}$ (P=7.9 min) with an amplitude of 1.45 mmag, and low frequency rotational modulation corresponding to a period of 20.4339 d with an amplitude of 7.64 mmag. Spectral analysis confirms the Ap nature of the target, with characteristic lines of Eu II, Nd III and Pr III present. The spectra are not greatly affected by broadening, which is consistent with the long rotational period found from photometry. From our spectral observations we derive a lower limit on the mean magnetic field modulus of <B> = 3.05$\pm$0.23 kG. Long Cadence Kepler observations show a frequency quintuplet split by the rotational period of the star, typical for an oblique pulsator. We suggest the star is a quadrupole pulsator with a geometry such that $i\sim66^\circ$ and $\beta\sim33^\circ$. We detect frequency variations of the pulsation in both the WASP and Kepler data sets on many time scales. Linear, non-adiabatic stability modelling allows us to constrain a region on the HR diagram where the pulsations are unstable, an area consistent with observations.
  • The searches for transiting exoplanets have produced a vast amount of time-resolved photometric data of many millions of stars. One of the leading ground-based surveys is the SuperWASP project. We present the initial results of a survey of over 1.5 million A-type stars in the search for high frequency pulsations using SuperWASP photometry. We are able to detect pulsations down to the 0.5 mmag level in the broad-band photometry. This has enabled the discovery of several rapidly oscillating Ap stars and over 200 delta Scuti stars with frequencies above 50 d$^{-1}$, and at least one pulsating sdB star. Such a large number of results allows us to statistically study the frequency overlap between roAp and delta Scuti stars and probe to higher frequency regimes with existing data.
  • The highly successful SuperWASP planetary transit finding programme has surveyed a large fraction of both the northern and southern skies. There now exists in the its archive over 420 billion photometric measurements for more than 31 million stars. SuperWASP provides good quality photometry with a precision exceeding 1% per observation in the approximate magnitude range 9 < V < 12. The archive enables long-baseline, high-cadence studies of stellar variability to be undertaken. An overview of the SuperWASP project is presented, along with results which demonstrate the survey's asteroseismic capabilities.
  • Low mass white dwarfs are the remnants of disrupted red giant stars in binary millisecond pulsars and other exotic binary star systems. Some low mass white dwarfs cool rapidly, while others stay bright for millions of years due to stable fusion in thick surface hydrogen layers. This dichotomy is not well understood so their potential use as independent clocks to test the spin-down ages of pulsars or as probes of the extreme environments in which low mass white dwarfs form cannot be fully exploited. Here we present precise mass and radius measurements for the precursor to a low mass white dwarf. We find that only models in which this star has a thick hydrogen envelope can match the strong constraints provided by our new observations. Very cool low mass white dwarfs must therefore have lost their thick hydrogen envelopes by irradiation from pulsar companions or by episodes of unstable hydrogen fusion (shell flashes). We also find that this low mass white dwarf precursor is a new type of pulsating star. The observed pulsation frequencies are sensitive to internal processes that determine whether this star will undergo shell flashes.
  • We present Spitzer/IRAC 4.5-micron transit photometry of GJ3470b, a Neptune-size planet orbiting a M1.5 dwarf star with a 3.3-day period recently discovered in the course of the HARPS M-dwarf survey. We refine the stellar parameters by employing purely empirical mass-luminosity and surface brightness relations constrained by our updated value for the mean stellar density, and additional information from new near-infrared spectroscopic observations. We derive a stellar mass of M_star = 0.539+0.047-0.043 M_sun and a radius of R_star = 0.568+0.037-0.031 R_sun. We determine the host star of GJ3470b to be metal-rich, with a metallicity of [Fe/H] = +0.20 +/- 0.10 and an effective temperature of Teff = 3600 +/- 100 K. The revised stellar parameters yield a planetary radius R_pl = 4.83+0.22-0.21 R_Earth that is 13 percent larger than the value previously reported in the literature. We find a planetary mass M_pl = 13.9+1.5-1.4 M_Earth that translates to a very low planetary density, rho_pl = 0.72+0.13-0.12 gcm-3, which is 33% smaller than the original value. With a mean density half of that of GJ436b, GJ3470b is an example of a very low-density low-mass planet, similar to Kepler-11d, Kepler-11e, and Kepler-18c but orbiting a much brighter nearby star that is more conducive to follow-up studies.
  • This paper introduces a series of papers aiming to study the dozens of low mass eclipsing binaries (EBLM), with F, G, K primaries, that have been discovered in the course of the WASP survey. Our objects are mostly single-line binaries whose eclipses have been detected by WASP and were initially followed up as potential planetary transit candidates. These have bright primaries, which facilitates spectroscopic observations during transit and allows the study of the spin-orbit distribution of F, G, K+M eclipsing binaries through the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. Here we report on the spin-orbit angle of WASP-30b, a transiting brown dwarf, and improve its orbital parameters. We also present the mass, radius, spin-orbit angle and orbital parameters of a new eclipsing binary, J1219-39b (1SWAPJ121921.03-395125.6, TYC 7760-484-1), which, with a mass of 95 +/- 2 Mjup, is close to the limit between brown dwarfs and stars. We find that both objects orbit in planes that appear aligned with their primaries' equatorial planes. Neither primaries are synchronous. J1219-39b has a modestly eccentric orbit and is in agreement with the theoretical mass--radius relationship, whereas WASP-30b lies above it.
  • Ground-based spectroscopic follow-up observations of the pulsating stars observed by the Kepler satellite mission are needed for their asteroseismic modelling. We aim to derive the fundamental parameters for a sample of 26 Gamma Doradus candidate stars observed by the Kepler satellite mission to accomplish one of the required preconditions for their asteroseismic modelling and to compare our results with the types of pulsators expected from the existing light curve analysis. We use the spectrum synthesis method to derive the fundamental parameters like Teff, logg, [M/H], and vsini from newly obtained spectra and compute the spectral energy distribution from literature photometry to get an independent measure of Teff. We find that most of the derived Teff values agree with the values given in the Kepler Input Catalogue. According to their positions in the HR-diagram three stars are expected Gamma Dor stars, ten stars are expected Delta Sct stars, and seven stars are possibly Delta Sct stars at the hot border of the instability strip. Four stars in our sample are found to be spectroscopic binary candidates and four stars have very low metallicity where two show about solar C abundance. Six of the 10 stars located in the Delta Sct instability region of the HR-diagram show both Delta Sct and Gamma Dor-type oscillations in their light curves implying that Gamma Dor-like oscillations are much more common among the Delta Sct stars than predicted by theory. Moreover, seven stars showing periods in the Delta Sct and the Delta Sct-Gamma Dor range in their light curves are located in the HR-diagram left of the blue edge of the theoretical Delta Sct instability strip. The consistency of these findings with recent investigations based on high-quality Kepler data implies the need for a revision of the theoretical Gamma Dor and Delta Sct instability strips.
  • We report the discovery of a new transiting planet in the Southern Hemisphere. It has been found by the WASP-south transit survey and confirmed photometrically and spectroscopically by the 1.2m Swiss Euler telescope, LCOGT 2m Faulkes South Telescope, the 60 cm TRAPPIST telescope and the ESO 3.6m telescope. The orbital period of the planet is 2.94 days. We find it is a gas giant with a mass of 0.88 \pm 0.10 Mj and a radius estimated at 0.96 \pm 0.05 Rj . We have also obtained spectra during transit with the HARPS spectrograph and detect the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect despite its small amplitude. Because of the low signal to noise of the effect and of a small impact parameter we cannot place a constraint on the projected spin-orbit angle. We find two confiicting values for the stellar rotation. Our determination, via spectral line broadening gives v sin I = 2.2 \pm 0.3 km/s, while another method, based on the activity level using the index log R'HK, gives an equatorial rotation velocity of only v = 1.35 \pm 0.20 km/s. Using these as priors in our analysis, the planet could either be misaligned or aligned. This should send strong warnings regarding the use of such priors. There is no evidence for eccentricity nor of any radial velocity drift with time.
  • The detection of increased sodium absorption during primary transit implies the presence of an atmosphere around an extrasolar planet, and enables us to infer the structure of this atmosphere. Sodium has only been detected in the atmospheres of two planets to date - HD189733b and HD209458b. WASP-17b is the least dense planet currently known. It has a radius approximately twice that of Jupiter and orbits an F6-type star. The transit signal is expected to be about five times larger than that observed in HD209458b. We obtained 24 spectra with the GIRAFFE spectrograph on the VLT, eight during transit. The integrated flux in the sodium doublet at wavelengths 5889.95 and 5895.92 {\AA} was measured at bandwidths 0.75, 1.5, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0, and 6.0 {\AA}. We find a transit depth of 0.55 \pm 0.13 per cent at 1.5 {\AA}. This suggests that, like HD209458b, WASP-17b has an atmosphere depleted in sodium compared to models for a cloud-free atmosphere with solar sodium abundance. We observe a sharp cut-off in sodium absorption between 3.0 and 4.0 {\AA} which may indicate a layer of clouds high in the atmosphere.
  • For transiting planets, the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect allows the measurement of the sky-projected angle beta between the stellar rotation axis and a planet's orbital axis. Using the HARPS spectrograph, we observed the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect for six transiting hot Jupiters found by the WASP consortium. We combine these with long term radial velocity measurements obtained with CORALIE. We found that three of our targets have a projected spin-orbit angle above 90 degrees: WASP-2b: beta = 153 (+11 -15), WASP-15b: beta = 139.6 (+5.2 -4.3) and WASP-17b: beta = 148.5 (+5.1 -4.2); the other three (WASP-4b, WASP-5b and WASP-18b) have angles compatible with 0 degrees. There is no dependence between the misaligned angle and planet mass nor with any other planetary parameter. All orbits are close to circular, with only one firm detection of eccentricity on WASP-18b with e = 0.00848 (+0.00085 -0.00095). No long term radial acceleration was detected for any of the targets. Combining all previous 20 measurements of beta and our six, we attempt to statistically determine the distribution of the real spin-orbit angle psi and find that between about 45 and 85 % of hot Jupiters have psi > 30 degrees. Observations and predictions using the Kozai mechanism match well. If these observational facts are confirmed in the future, we may then conclude that most hot Jupiters are formed from a dynamical and tidal origin without the necessity to use type I or II migration. At present, standard disc migration cannot explain the observations without invoking at least another additional process.