• We present ELDAR, a new method that exploits the potential of medium- and narrow-band filter surveys to securely identify active galactic nuclei (AGN) and determine their redshifts. Our methodology improves on traditional approaches by looking for AGN emission lines expected to be identified against the continuum, thanks to the width of the filters. To assess its performance, we apply ELDAR to the data of the ALHAMBRA survey, which covered an effective area of $2.38\,{\rm deg}^2$ with 20 contiguous medium-band optical filters down to F814W$\simeq 24.5$. Using two different configurations of ELDAR in which we require the detection of at least 2 and 3 emission lines, respectively, we extract two catalogues of type-I AGN. The first is composed of 585 sources ($79\,\%$ of them spectroscopically-unknown) down to F814W$=22.5$ at $z_{\rm phot}>1$, which corresponds to a surface density of $209\,{\rm deg}^{-2}$. In the second, the 494 selected sources ($83\,\%$ of them spectroscopically-unknown) reach F814W$=23$ at $z_{\rm phot}>1.5$, for a corresponding number density of $176\,{\rm deg}^{-2}$. Then, using samples of spectroscopically-known AGN in the ALHAMBRA fields, for the two catalogues we estimate a completeness of $73\,\%$ and $67\,\%$, and a redshift precision of $1.01\,\%$ and $0.86\,\%$ (with outliers fractions of $8.1\,\%$ and $5.8\,\%$). At $z>2$, where our selection performs best, we reach $85\,\%$ and $77\,\%$ completeness and we find no contamination from galaxies.
  • We present the cluster selection function for three of the largest next-generation stage-IV surveys in the optical and infrared: Euclid-Optimistic, Euclid-Pessimistic and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). To simulate these surveys, we use the realistic mock catalogues introduced in the first paper of this series. We detected galaxy clusters using the Bayesian Cluster Finder (BCF) in the mock catalogues. We then modeled and calibrated the total cluster stellar mass observable-theoretical mass ($M^*_{\rm CL}-M_{\rm h}$) relation using a power law model, including a possible redshift evolution term. We find a moderate scatter of $\sigma_{M^*_{\rm CL} | M_{\rm h}}$ of 0.124, 0.135 and 0.136 $\rm dex$ for Euclid-Optimistic, Euclid-Pessimistic and LSST, respectively, comparable to other work over more limited ranges of redshift. Moreover, the three datasets are consistent with negligible evolution with redshift, in agreement with observational and simulation results in the literature. We find that Euclid-Optimistic will be able to detect clusters with $>80\%$ completeness and purity down to $8\times10^{13} h^{-1} M_{\odot}$ up to $z<1$. At higher redshifts, the same completeness and purity are obtained with the larger mass threshold of $2\times10^{14} h^{-1} M_{\odot}$ up to $z=2$. The Euclid-Pessimistic selection function has a similar shape with $\sim10\%$ higher mass limit. LSST shows $\sim 5\%$ higher mass limit than Euclid-Optimistic up to $z<0.7$ and increases afterwards, reaching values of $2\times10^{14} h^{-1} M_{\odot}$ at $z=1.4$. Similar selection functions with only $80\%$ completeness threshold have been also computed. The complementarity of these results with selection functions for surveys in other bands is discussed.
  • The impending Javalambre Physics of the accelerating universe Astrophysical Survey (J-PAS) will be the first wide-field survey of $\gtrsim$ 8500 deg$^2$ to reach the `stage IV' category. Because of the redshift resolution afforded by 54 narrow-band filters, J-PAS is particularly suitable for cluster detection in the range z$<$1. The photometric redshift dispersion is estimated to be only $\sim 0.003$ with few outliers $\lesssim$ 4\% for galaxies brighter than $i\sim23$ AB, because of the sensitivity of narrow band imaging to absorption and emission lines. Here we evaluate the cluster selection function for J-PAS using N-body+semi-analytical realistic mock catalogues. We optimally detect clusters from this simulation with the Bayesian Cluster Finder, and we assess the completeness and purity of cluster detection against the mock data. The minimum halo mass threshold we find for detections of galaxy clusters and groups with both $>$80\% completeness and purity is $M_h \sim 5 \times 10^{13}M_{\odot}$ up to $z\sim 0.7$. We also model the optical observable, $M^*_{\rm CL}$-halo mass relation, finding a non-evolution with redshift and main scatter of $\sigma_{M^*_{\rm CL} | M_{\rm h}}\sim 0.14 \,dex$ down to a factor two lower in mass than other planned broad-band stage IV surveys, at least. For the $M_{\rm h} \sim 1 \times 10^{14}M_{\odot}$ Planck mass limit, J-PAS will arrive up to $z\sim 0.85$ with a $\sigma_{M^*_{\rm CL} | M_{\rm h}}\sim 0.12 \, dex$. Therefore J-PAS will provide the largest sample of clusters and groups up to $z\sim 0.8$ with a mass calibration accuracy comparable to X-ray data.
  • We present new mock catalogues for two of the largest stage-IV next-generation surveys in the optical and infrared: LSST and Euclid, based on an N-body simulation+semi-analytical cone with a posterior modification with \texttt{PhotReal}. This technique modifies the original photometry by using an empirical library of spectral templates to make it more realistic. The reliability of the catalogues is confirmed by comparing the obtained color-magnitude relation, the luminosity and mass function and the angular correlation function with those of real data. Consistent comparisons between the expected photometric redshifts for different surveys are also provided. Very deep near infrared surveys such as Euclid will provide very good performance ($\Delta z/(1+z) \sim 0.025-0.053$) down to $H\sim24$ AB mag and up to $z\sim3$ depending on the optical observations available from the ground whereas extremely deep optical surveys such as LSST will obtain an overall lower photometric redshift resolution ($\Delta z/(1+z) \sim 0.045$) down to $i\sim27.5$ AB mag, being considerably improved ($\Delta z/(1+z) \sim 0.035$) if we restrict the sample down to i$\sim$24 AB mag. Those numbers can be substantially upgraded by selecting a subsample of galaxies with the best quality photometric redshifts. We finally discuss the impact that these surveys will have for the community in terms of photometric redshift legacy. This is the first of a series of papers where we set a framework for comparability between mock catalogues and observations with a particular focus on cluster surveys. The Euclid and LSST mocks are made publicly available in the following link: http://photmocks.obspm.fr/.
  • We present a catalogue of 348 galaxy clusters and groups with $0.2<z<1.2$ selected in the 2.78 $deg^2$ ALHAMBRA Survey. The high precision of our photometric redshifts, close to $1\%$, and the wide spread of the seven ALHAMBRA pointings ensure that this catalogue has better mass sensitivity and is less affected by cosmic variance than comparable samples. The detection has been carried out with the Bayesian Cluster Finder (BCF), whose performance has been checked in ALHAMBRA-like light-cone mock catalogues. Great care has been taken to ensure that the observable properties of the mocks photometry accurately correspond to those of real catalogues. From our simulations, we expect to detect galaxy clusters and groups with both $70\%$ completeness and purity down to dark matter halo masses of $M_h\sim3\times10^{13}\rm M_{\odot}$ for $z<0.85$. Cluster redshifts are expected to be recovered with $\sim0.6\%$ precision for $z<1$. We also expect to measure cluster masses with $\sigma_{M_h|M^*_{CL}}\sim0.25-0.35\, dex$ precision down to $\sim3\times10^{13}\rm M_{\odot}$, masses which are $50\%$ smaller than those reached by similar work. We have compared these detections with previous optical, spectroscopic and X-rays work, finding an excellent agreement with the rates reported from the simulations. We have also explored the overall properties of these detections such as the presence of a colour-magnitude relation, the evolution of the photometric blue fraction and the clustering of these sources in the different ALHAMBRA fields. Despite the small numbers, we observe tentative evidence that, for a fixed stellar mass, the environment is playing a crucial role at lower redshifts (z$<$0.5).
  • The stellar mass-halo mass relation is a key constraint in all semi-analytic, numerical, and semi-empirical models of galaxy formation and evolution. However, its exact shape and redshift dependence remain debated. Several recent works support a relation in the local Universe steeper than previously thought. Based on the comparisons with a variety of data on massive central galaxies, we show that this steepening holds up to z~1, for stellar masses Mstar>2e11 Msun. Specifically, we find significant evidence for a high-mass end slope of \beta>0.35-0.70, instead of the usual \beta~0.20-0.30 reported by a number of previous results. When including the independent constraints from the recent BOSS clustering measurements, the data, independent of any systematic errors in stellar masses, tend to favor a model with a very small scatter (< 0.15 dex) in stellar mass at fixed halo mass, in the redshift range z < 0.8 and for Mstar>3e11 Msun, suggesting a close connection between massive galaxies and host halos even at relatively recent epochs. We discuss the implications of our results with respect to the evolution of the most massive galaxies since z~1.
  • In this study we investigate the formation and evolution mechanisms of the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) over cosmic time. At high redshift ($z\sim0.9$), we selected BCGs and most massive cluster galaxies (MMCGs) from the Cl1604 supercluster and compared them to low-redshift ($z\sim0.1$) counterparts drawn from the MCXC meta-catalog, supplemented by SDSS imaging and spectroscopy. We observed striking differences in the morphological, color, spectral, and stellar mass properties of the BCGs/MMCGs in the two samples. High-redshift BCGs/MMCGs were, in many cases, star-forming, late-type galaxies, with blue broadband colors, properties largely absent amongst the low-redshift BCGs/MMCGs. The stellar mass of BCGs was found to increase by an average factor of $2.51\pm0.71$ from $z\sim0.9$ to $z\sim0.1$. Through this and other comparisons we conclude that a combination of major merging (mainly wet or mixed) and \emph{in situ} star formation are the main mechanisms which build stellar mass in BCGs/MMCGs. The stellar mass growth of the BCGs/MMCGs also appears to grow in lockstep with both the stellar baryonic and total mass of the cluster. Additionally, BCGs/MMCGs were found to grow in size, on average, a factor of $\sim3$, while their average S\'ersic index increased by $\sim$0.45 from $z\sim0.9$ to $z\sim0.1$, also supporting a scenario involving major merging, though some adiabatic expansion is required. These observational results are compared to both models and simulations to further explore the implications on processes which shape and evolve BCGs/MMCGs over the past $\sim$7 Gyr.
  • We present the first sample of 882 optically selected galaxy clusters in the Deep Lens Survey (DLS), selected with the Bayesian Cluster Finder. We create mock DLS data to assess completeness and purity rates, and find that both are at least $70\%$ within 0.1$\le z \le$ 1.2 for clusters with $M_{200}\ge 1.2\times 10^{14}M_{\odot}$. We verified the integrity of the sample by performing several comparisons with other optical, weak lensing, X-ray and spectroscopic surveys which overlap the DLS footprint: the estimated redshifts are consistent with the spectroscopic redshifts of known clusters (for $z>0.25$ where saturation in the DLS is not an issue); our richness estimates in combination with a previously calibrated richness-mass relation yields individual cluster mass estimates consistent with available SHeLS dynamical mass estimates; synthetic mass maps made from the optical mass estimates are correlated ($>3\sigma$ significance) with the weak lensing mass maps; and the mass function thus derived is consistent with theoretical predictions for the CDM scenario. With the verified sample we investigated correlations between the brightest cluster galaxies (BCG) properties and the host cluster properties within a broader range in redshift (0.25 $\le z \le$ 0.8) and mass ($\ge2.4\times 10^{14}M_{\odot}$) than in previous work. We find that the slope of the BCG magnitude-redshift relation throughout this redshift range is consistent with that found at lower redshifts. This result supports an extrapolation to higher redshift of passive evolution of the BCG within the hierarchical scenario.
  • Galaxy clusters are the largest structures in Universe. They are very important as both cosmological probes and astrophysical laboratories. Several methods have been developed to detect galaxy clusters with different techniques (optical, X-rays, Weak Lensing and Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect) providing cluster samples with a well-characterized purity and completeness rates up to moderate redshift (z$<$1.2). These samples allow us to study the systematic of different methods and to obtain reliable mass estimations. On the contrary, high redshift clusters only started to be explored very recently with the advent of deep IR and X-ray data surveys, providing the first proto-clusters (z$>$1.5-2) ever detected. In this talk, I introduce these techniques and review some of the cluster samples obtained including particular striking cases. I discuss their relevance in terms of cosmological and galaxy evolution constraints and finally, I briefly refer to the cluster science predictions for the next generation surveys.
  • Hubble Space Telescope images of the galaxy cluster Abell 2261, obtained as part of the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble, show that the brightest galaxy in the cluster, A2261-BCG, has the largest core yet detected in any galaxy. The cusp radius of A2261-BCG is 3.2 kpc, twice as big as the next largest core known, and ~3x bigger than those typically seen in the most luminous BCGs. The morphology of the core in A2261-BCG is also unusual, having a flat or even slightly-depressed interior surface brightness profile, rather than the typical shallow cusp. This implies that the galaxy has a core with constant or even centrally decreasing stellar density. Interpretation of the core as an end product of the "scouring" action of a binary supermassive black hole implies a total black hole mass ~1E+10 M_sun from the extrapolation of most relationships between core structure and black hole mass. The core falls 1-sigma above the cusp-radius versus galaxy luminosity relation. Its large size in real terms, and the extremely large black hole mass required to generate it, raise the possibility that the core has been enlarged by additional processes, such as the ejection of the black holes that originally generated the core. The flat central stellar density profile is consistent with this hypothesis. The core is also displaced by 0.7 kpc from the center of the surrounding envelope, consistent with a local dynamical perturbation of the core.
  • We precisely constrain the inner mass profile of Abell 2261 (z=0.225) for the first time and determine this cluster is not "over-concentrated" as found previously, implying a formation time in agreement with {\Lambda}CDM expectations. These results are based on strong lensing analyses of new 16-band HST imaging obtained as part of the Cluster Lensing and Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). Combining this with revised weak lensing analyses of Subaru wide field imaging with 5-band Subaru + KPNO photometry, we place tight new constraints on the halo virial mass M_vir = 2.2\pm0.2\times10^15 M\odot/h70 (within r \approx 3 Mpc/h70) and concentration c = 6.2 \pm 0.3 when assuming a spherical halo. This agrees broadly with average c(M,z) predictions from recent {\Lambda}CDM simulations which span 5 <~ <c> <~ 8. Our most significant systematic uncertainty is halo elongation along the line of sight. To estimate this, we also derive a mass profile based on archival Chandra X-ray observations and find it to be ~35% lower than our lensing-derived profile at r2500 ~ 600 kpc. Agreement can be achieved by a halo elongated with a ~2:1 axis ratio along our line of sight. For this elongated halo model, we find M_vir = 1.7\pm0.2\times10^15 M\odot/h70 and c_vir = 4.6\pm0.2, placing rough lower limits on these values. The need for halo elongation can be partially obviated by non-thermal pressure support and, perhaps entirely, by systematic errors in the X-ray mass measurements. We estimate the effect of background structures based on MMT/Hectospec spectroscopic redshifts and find these tend to lower Mvir further by ~7% and increase cvir by ~5%.
  • The detection of galaxy clusters in present and future surveys enables measuring mass-to-light ratios, clustering properties, galaxy cluster abundances and therefore, constraining cosmological parameters. We present a new technique for detecting galaxy clusters, which is based on the Matched Filter Algorithm from a Bayesian point of view. The method is able to determine the position, redshift and richness of the cluster through the maximization of a filter depending on galaxy luminosity, density and photometric redshift combined with a galaxy cluster prior that accounts for color-magnitude relations and BCG-redshift relation. We tested the algorithm through realistic mock galaxy catalogs, revealing that the detections are 100% complete and 80% pure for clusters up to z $<$1.2 and richer than $\Lambda_{CL}>$20 (Abell Richness $\sim$0, M$\sim4\times10^{14} M_{\odot}$). The completeness and purity remains approximately the same if we do not include the prior information, implying that this method is able to detect galaxy cluster with and without a well defined red sequence. We applied the algorithm to the CFHTLS Archive Research Survey (CARS) data, recovering similar detections as previously published using the same or deeper data plus additional clusters which appear to be real.
  • The detection of galaxy clusters in present and future surveys enables measuring mass-to-light ratios, clustering properties or galaxy cluster abundances and therefore, constraining cosmological parameters. We present a new technique for detecting galaxy clusters, which is based on the Matched Filter Algorithm from a Bayesian point of view. The method is able to determine the position, redshift and richness of the cluster through the maximization of a filter depending on galaxy luminosity, density and photometric redshift combined with a galaxy cluster prior. We tested the algorithm through realistic mock galaxy catalogs, revealing that the detections are 100% complete and 80% pure for clusters up to z <1.2 and richer than \Lambda > 25 (Abell Richness > 0). We applied the algorithm to the CFHTLS Archive Research Survey (CARS) data, recovering similar detections as previously published using the same data plus additional clusters that are very probably real. We also applied this algorithm to the Deep Lens Survey (DLS), obtaining the first sample of optical-selected galaxy in this survey. The sample is complete up to redshift 0.7 and we detect more than 780 cluster candidates up to redshift 1.2. We conclude by discussing the differences between previous weak lensing detections in this survey and optical detections in both samples.
  • We present an improved strong-lensing analysis of Cl0024+1654 ($z$=0.39) using deep HST/ACS/NIC3 images, based on 33 multiply-lensed images of 11 background galaxies. These are found with a model that assumes mass approximately traces light, with a low order expansion to allow for flexibility on large scales. The model is constrained initially by the well known 5-image system ($z$=1.675) and refined as new multiply-lensed systems are identified using the model. Photometric redshifts of these new systems are then used to constrain better the mass profile by adopting the standard cosmological relation between redshift and lensing distance. Our model requires only 6 free parameters to describe well all positional and redshift data. The resulting inner mass profile has a slope of $d\log M/d\log r\simeq -0.55$, consistent with new weak-lensing measurements where the data overlap, at $r\simeq200$ kpc/$h_{70}$. The combined profile is well fitted by a high concentration NFW mass profile, $C_{\rm vir}\sim 8.6\pm1.6$, similar to other well studied clusters, but larger than predicted with standard $\Lambda$CDM. A well defined radial critical curve is generated by the model and is clearly observed at $r \simeq 12\arcsec$, outlined by elongated images pointing towards the centre of mass. The relative fluxes of the multiply-lensed images are found to agree well with the modelled magnifications, providing an independent consistency check.