• We investigate to what degree local physical and chemical conditions are related to the evolutionary status of various objects in star-forming media. rho Oph A displays the entire sequence of low-mass star formation in a small volume of space. Using spectrophotometric line maps of H2, H2O, NH3, N2H+, O2, OI, CO, and CS, we examine the distribution of the atomic and molecular gas in this dense molecular core. The physical parameters of these species are derived, as are their relative abundances in rho Oph A. Using radiative transfer models, we examine the infall status of the cold dense cores from their resolved line profiles of the ground state lines of H2O and NH3, where for the latter no contamination from the VLA 1623 outflow is observed and line overlap of the hyperfine components is explicitly taken into account. The stratified structure of this photon dominated region (PDR), seen edge-on, is clearly displayed. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and OI are seen throughout the region around the exciting star S1. At the interface to the molecular core 0.05 pc away, atomic hydrogen is rapidly converted into H2, whereas OI protrudes further into the molecular core. This provides oxygen atoms for the gas-phase formation of O2 in the core SM1, where X(O2)~ 5.e-8. There, the ratio of the O2 to H2O abundance [X(H2O)~ 5.e-9] is significantly higher than unity. Away from the core, O2 experiences a dramatic decrease due to increasing H2O formation. Outside the molecular core, on the far side as seen from S1, the intense radiation from the 0.5 pc distant early B-type star HD147889 destroys the molecules. Towards the dark core SM1, the observed abundance ratio X(O2)/X(H2O)>1, which suggests that this object is extremely young, which would explain why O2 is such an elusive molecule outside the solar system.
  • We are addressing the sites of isolated low mass star formation in the solar neighbourhood, i.e. small cloud cores within one kiloparsec. We aim at determining the physical parameters of the cores, i.e., temperature, volume density, column density and (radial) velocity fields, and the status of star formation, i.e., whether embedded objects are present within the cores. Surveying small dark clouds in both celestial hemispheres we study the physical conditions of low-mass star formation for detectable core masses M>0.01Msun. The target list is drawn from catalogues of optically selected dark cloud cores, where the visual extinction exceeds 5 magnitudes. The selected probe is the CS molecule that needs high densities for excitation of its rotational levels. To gauge the state of excitation, the cores were observed in two transitions. In a limited number of cases, optical depths were derived from complementing lines of the rarer isotopologue C34S for the (2-1) and (3-2) transitions. Making small (3arcmin by 3arcmin) maps, the 471 optically selected cores were searched for CS(2-1) and 315 (67%) were detected (T_A*>3sigma). In general, the position of peak CS emission does not coincide with the optically determined centre of the cores. The cores appear cold (T<10K) and, in the majority of cases, the CS emission is optically thin (tau<1). On the arcminute scales of the observations, the median column density of carbon monosulfide is N(CS)=7.E12/cm2. For an average abundance of N(CS)/N(H2)=1.E-8, the median mass of the detected cores is 1.0Msun. The line shapes are most often Gaussian with widths exceeding that due to thermal broadening of <0.1km/s. The observed median FWHM=0.7km/s, i.e. non-thermal turbulence contributes dominantly to the line widths
  • Context: The abundance of key molecules determines the level of cooling that is necessary for the formation of stars and planetary systems. In this context, one needs to understand the details of the time dependent oxygen chemistry, leading to the formation of molecular oxygen and water. Aims: We aim to determine the degree of correlation between the occurrence of O2 and HOOH (hydrogen peroxide) in star-forming molecular clouds. We first detected O2 and HOOH in the rho Ophiuchi cloud (core A), we now search for HOOH in Orion Molecular Cloud OMC A, where O2 has also been detected. Methods: We mapped a 3 arcmin times 3 arcmin region around Orion H2-Peak 1 with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX). In addition to several maps in two transitions of HOOH, viz. 219.17 GHz and 251.91 GHz, we obtained single-point spectra for another three transitions towards the position of maximum emission. Results: Line emission at the appropriate LSR-velocity (Local Standard of Rest) and at the level of greater or equal to 4 sigma was found for two transitions, with lower S/N (2.8 - 3.5 sigma) for another two transitions, whereas for the remaining transition, only an upper limit was obtained. The emitting region, offset 18 arcsec south of H2-Peak 1, appeared point-like in our observations with APEX. Conclusions: The extremely high spectral line density in Orion makes the identification of HOOH much more difficult than in rho Oph A. As a result of having to consider the possible contamination by other molecules, we left the current detection status undecided.
  • Using the Herschel Space Observatory's Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared (HIFI), we have observed para-chloronium (H2Cl+) toward six sources in the Galaxy. We detected interstellar chloronium absorption in foreground molecular clouds along the sight-lines to the bright submillimeter continuum sources Sgr A (+50 km/s cloud) and W31C. Both the para-H2-35Cl+ and para-H2-37Cl+ isotopologues were detected, through observations of their 1(11)-0(00) transitions at rest frequencies of 485.42 and 484.23 GHz, respectively. For an assumed ortho-to-para ratio of 3, the observed optical depths imply that chloronium accounts for ~ 4 - 12% of chlorine nuclei in the gas phase. We detected interstellar chloronium emission from two sources in the Orion Molecular Cloud 1: the Orion Bar photodissociation region and the Orion South condensation. For an assumed ortho-to-para ratio of 3 for chloronium, the observed emission line fluxes imply total beam-averaged column densities of ~ 2.0E+13 cm-2 and ~ 1.2E+13 cm-2, respectively, for chloronium in these two sources. We obtained upper limits on the para-H2-35Cl+ line strengths toward H2 Peak 1 in the Orion Molecular cloud and toward the massive young star AFGL 2591. The chloronium abundances inferred in this study are typically at least a factor ~10 larger than the predictions of steady-state theoretical models for the chemistry of interstellar molecules containing chlorine. Several explanations for this discrepancy were investigated, but none has proven satisfactory, and thus the large observed abundances of chloronium remain puzzling.
  • We report observations of three rotational transitions of molecular oxygen (O2) in emission from the H2 Peak 1 position of vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen in Orion. We observed the 487 GHz, 774 GHz, and 1121 GHz lines using HIFI on the Herschel Space Observatory, having velocities of 11 km s-1 to 12 km s-1 and widths of 3 km s-1. The beam-averaged column density is N(O2) = 6.5\times1016 cm-2, and assuming that the source has an equal beam filling factor for all transitions (beam widths 44, 28, and 19"), the relative line intensities imply a kinetic temperature between 65 K and 120 K. The fractional abundance of O2 relative to H2 is 0.3 - 7.3\times10-6. The unusual velocity suggests an association with a ~ 5" diameter source, denoted Peak A, the Western Clump, or MF4. The mass of this source is ~ 10 M\odot and the dust temperature is \geq 150 K. Our preferred explanation of the enhanced O2 abundance is that dust grains in this region are sufficiently warm (T \geq 100 K) to desorb water ice and thus keep a significant fraction of elemental oxygen in the gas phase, with a significant fraction as O2. For this small source, the line ratios require a temperature \geq 180 K. The inferred O2 column density \simeq 5\times1018 cm-2 can be produced in Peak A, having N(H2) \simeq 4\times1024 cm-2. An alternative mechanism is a low-velocity (10 to 15 km s-1) C-shock, which can produce N(O2) up to 1017 cm-2.