• We investigate the use of estimators of weak lensing power spectra based on a flat-sky implementation of the Pseudo-Cl (PCl) technique, where the masked shear field is transformed without regard for masked regions of sky. This masking mixes power, and E-convergence and B-modes. To study the accuracy of forward-modelling and full-sky power spectrum recovery we consider both large-area survey geometries, and small-scale masking due to stars and a checkerboard model for field-of-view gaps. The power spectrum for the large-area survey geometry is sparsely-sampled and highly oscillatory, which makes modelling problematic. Instead, we derive an overall calibration for large-area mask bias using simulated fields. The effects of small-area star masks can be accurately corrected for, while the checkerboard mask has oscillatory and spiky behaviour which leads to percent biases. Apodisation of the masked fields leads to increased biases and a loss of information. We find that we can construct an unbiased forward-model of the raw PCls, and recover the full-sky convergence power to within a few percent accuracy for both Gaussian and lognormal-distributed shear fields. Propagating this through to cosmological parameters using a Fisher-Matrix formalism, we find we can make unbiased estimates of parameters for surveys up to 1,200 deg$^2$ with 30 galaxies per arcmin$^2$, beyond which the percent biases become larger than the statistical accuracy. This implies a flat-sky PCl analysis is accurate for current surveys but a Euclid-like survey will require higher accuracy.
  • We present cosmological parameter constraints from a joint analysis of three cosmological probes: the tomographic cosmic shear signal in $\sim$450 deg$^2$ of data from the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS), the galaxy-matter cross-correlation signal of galaxies from the Galaxies And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey determined with KiDS weak lensing, and the angular correlation function of the same GAMA galaxies. We use fast power spectrum estimators that are based on simple integrals over the real-space correlation functions, and show that they are practically unbiased over relevant angular frequency ranges. We test our full pipeline on numerical simulations that are tailored to KiDS and retrieve the input cosmology. By fitting different combinations of power spectra, we demonstrate that the three probes are internally consistent. For all probes combined, we obtain $S_8\equiv \sigma_8 \sqrt{\Omega_{\rm m}/0.3}=0.800_{-0.027}^{+0.029}$, consistent with Planck and the fiducial KiDS-450 cosmic shear correlation function results. Marginalising over wide priors on the mean of the tomographic redshift distributions yields consistent results for $S_8$ with an increase of $28\%$ in the error. The combination of probes results in a $26\%$ reduction in uncertainties of $S_8$ over using the cosmic shear power spectra alone. The main gain from these additional probes comes through their constraining power on nuisance parameters, such as the galaxy intrinsic alignment amplitude or potential shifts in the redshift distributions, which are up to a factor of two better constrained compared to using cosmic shear alone, demonstrating the value of large-scale structure probe combination.
  • We conduct a comprehensive study of the effects of incorporating galaxy morphology information in photometric redshift estimation. Using machine learning methods, we assess the changes in the scatter and catastrophic outlier fraction of photometric redshifts when galaxy size, ellipticity, S\'{e}rsic index and surface brightness are included in training on galaxy samples from the SDSS and the CFHT Stripe-82 Survey (CS82). We show that by adding galaxy morphological parameters to full $ugriz$ photometry, only mild improvements are obtained, while the gains are substantial in cases where fewer passbands are available. For instance, the combination of $grz$ photometry and morphological parameters almost fully recovers the metrics of $5$-band photometric redshifts. We demonstrate that with morphology it is possible to determine useful redshift distribution $N(z)$ of galaxy samples without any colour information. We also find that the inclusion of quasar redshifts and associated object sizes in training improves the quality of photometric redshift catalogues, compensating for the lack of a good star-galaxy separator. We further show that morphological information can mitigate biases and scatter due to bad photometry. As an application, we derive both point estimates and posterior distributions of redshifts for the official CS82 catalogue, training on morphology and SDSS Stripe-82 $ugriz$ bands when available. Our redshifts yield a 68th percentile error of $0.058(1+z)$, and a catastrophic outlier fraction of $5.2$ per cent. We further include a deep extension trained on morphology and single $i$-band CS82 photometry.
  • We explore two methods of compressing the redshift space galaxy power spectrum and bispectrum with respect to a chosen set of cosmological parameters. Both methods involve reducing the dimension of the original data-vector ( e.g. 1000 elements ) to the number of cosmological parameters considered ( e.g. seven ) using the Karhunen-Lo\`eve algorithm. In the first case, we run MCMC sampling on the compressed data-vector in order to recover the one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) posterior distributions. The second option, approximately 2000 times faster, works by orthogonalising the parameter space through diagonalisation of the Fisher information matrix before the compression, obtaining the posterior distributions without the need of MCMC sampling. Using these methods for future spectroscopic redshift surveys like DESI, EUCLID and PFS would drastically reduce the number of simulations needed to compute accurate covariance matrices with minimal loss of constraining power. We consider a redshift bin of a DESI-like experiment. Using the power spectrum combined with the bispectrum as a data-vector, both compression methods on average recover the 68% credible regions to within 0.7% and 2% of those resulting from standard MCMC sampling respectively. These confidence intervals are also smaller than the ones obtained using only the power spectrum by (81%, 80%, 82%) respectively for the bias parameter b_1, the growth rate f and the scalar amplitude parameter A_s.
  • Weak gravitational lensing alters the apparent separations between observed sources, potentially affecting clustering statistics. We derive a general expression for the lensing deflection which is valid for any three-point statistic, and investigate its effect on the three-point clustering correlation function. We find that deflection of the clustering correlation function is greatest at around $z=2$. It is most prominent in regions where the correlation function varies rapidly, in particular at the baryon acoustic oscillation scale where it smooths out the peaks and troughs, reducing the peak-to-trough difference by about 0.1 percent at $z=1$ and around 2.3 percent at $z=10$. The modification due to lensing deflection is typically at the per cent level of the expected errors in a Euclid-like survey and therefore undetectable.
  • Tidal gravitational forces can modify the shape of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, thus correlating their orientation with the surrounding matter density field. We study the dependence of this phenomenon, known as intrinsic alignment (IA), on the mass of the dark matter haloes that host these bright structures, analysing the Millennium and Millennium-XXL $N$-body simulations. We closely follow the observational approach, measuring the halo position-halo shape alignment and subsequently dividing out the dependence on halo bias. We derive a theoretical scaling of the IA amplitude with mass in a dark matter universe, and predict a power-law with slope $\beta_{\mathrm{M}}$ in the range $1/3$ to $1/2$, depending on mass scale. We find that the simulation data agree with each other and with the theoretical prediction remarkably well over three orders of magnitude in mass, with the joint analysis yielding an estimate of $\beta_{\mathrm{M}} = 0.36^{+0.01}_{-0.01}$. This result does not depend on redshift or on the details of the halo shape measurement. The analysis is repeated on observational data, obtaining a significantly higher value, $\beta_{\mathrm{M}} = 0.56^{+0.05}_{-0.05}$. There are also small but significant deviations from our simple model in the simulation signals at both the high- and low-mass end. We discuss possible reasons for these discrepancies, and argue that they can be attributed to physical processes not captured in the model or in the dark matter-only simulations.
  • It is common practice in cosmology to model large-scale structure observables as lognormal random fields, and this approach has been successfully applied in the past to the matter density and weak lensing convergence fields separately. We argue that this approach has fundamental limitations which prevent its use for jointly modelling these two fields since the lognormal distribution's shape can prevent certain correlations to be attainable. Given the need of ongoing and future large-scale structure surveys for fast joint simulations of clustering and weak lensing, we propose two ways of overcoming these limitations. The first approach slightly distorts the power spectra of the fields using one of two algorithms that minimises either the absolute or the fractional distortions. The second one is by obtaining more accurate convergence marginal distributions, for which we provide a fitting function, by integrating the lognormal density along the line of sight. The latter approach also provides a way to determine directly from theory the skewness of the convergence distribution and, therefore, the parameters for a lognormal fit. We present the public code Full-sky Lognormal Astro-fields Simulation Kit (FLASK) which can make tomographic realisations on the sphere of an arbitrary number of correlated lognormal or Gaussian random fields by applying either of the two proposed solutions, and show that it can create joint simulations of clustering and lensing with sub-per-cent accuracy over relevant angular scales and redshift ranges.
  • We test extensions to the standard cosmological model with weak gravitational lensing tomography using 450 deg$^2$ of imaging data from the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS). In these extended cosmologies, which include massive neutrinos, nonzero curvature, evolving dark energy, modified gravity, and running of the scalar spectral index, we also examine the discordance between KiDS and cosmic microwave background measurements from Planck. The discordance between the two datasets is largely unaffected by a more conservative treatment of the lensing systematics and the removal of angular scales most sensitive to nonlinear physics. The only extended cosmology that simultaneously alleviates the discordance with Planck and is at least moderately favored by the data includes evolving dark energy with a time-dependent equation of state (in the form of the $w_0-w_a$ parameterization). In this model, the respective $S_8 = \sigma_8 \sqrt{\Omega_{\rm m}/0.3}$ constraints agree at the $1\sigma$ level, and there is `substantial concordance' between the KiDS and Planck datasets when accounting for the full parameter space. Moreover, the Planck constraint on the Hubble constant is wider than in LCDM and in agreement with the Riess et al. (2016) direct measurement of $H_0$. The dark energy model is moderately favored as compared to LCDM when combining the KiDS and Planck measurements, and remains moderately favored after including an informative prior on the Hubble constant. In both of these scenarios, marginalized constraints in the $w_0-w_a$ plane are discrepant with a cosmological constant at the $3\sigma$ level. Moreover, KiDS constrains the sum of neutrino masses to 4.0 eV (95% CL), finds no preference for time or scale dependent modifications to the metric potentials, and is consistent with flatness and no running of the spectral index. The analysis code is public at https://github.com/sjoudaki/kids450
  • We measure the alignment of the shapes of galaxy clusters, as traced by their satellite distributions, with the matter density field using the public redMaPPer catalogue based on SDSS-DR8, which contains 26 111 clusters up to z~0.6. The clusters are split into nine redshift and richness samples; in each of them we detect a positive alignment, showing that clusters point towards density peaks. We interpret the measurements within the tidal alignment paradigm, allowing for a richness and redshift dependence. The intrinsic alignment (IA) amplitude at the pivot redshift z=0.3 and pivot richness \lambda=30 is A_{IA}^{gen}=12.6_{-1.2}^{+1.5}. We obtain tentative evidence that the signal increases towards higher richness and lower redshift. Our measurements agree well with results of maxBCG clusters and with dark-matter-only simulations. Comparing our results to IA measurements of luminous red galaxies, we find that the IA amplitude of galaxy clusters forms a smooth extension towards higher mass. This suggests that these systems share a common alignment mechanism, which can be exploited to improve our physical understanding of IA.
  • We constrain the average halo ellipticity of ~2 600 galaxy groups from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey, using the weak gravitational lensing signal measured from the overlapping Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS). To do so, we quantify the azimuthal dependence of the stacked lensing signal around seven different proxies for the orientation of the dark matter distribution, as it is a priori unknown which one traces the orientation best. On small scales, the major axis of the brightest group/cluster member (BCG) provides the best proxy, leading to a clear detection of an anisotropic signal. In order to relate that to a halo ellipticity, we have to adopt a model density profile. We derive new expressions for the quadrupole moments of the shear field given an elliptical model surface mass density profile. Modeling the signal with an elliptical Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile on scales < 250 kpc, which roughly corresponds to half the virial radius, and assuming that the BCG is perfectly aligned with the dark matter, we find an average halo ellipticity of e_h=0.38 +/- 0.12. This agrees well with results from cold-dark-matter-only simulations, which typically report values of e_h ~ 0.3. On larger scales, the lensing signal around the BCGs does not trace the dark matter distribution well, and the distribution of group satellites provides a better proxy for the halo's orientation instead, leading to a 3--4 sigma detection of a non-zero halo ellipticity at scales between 250 kpc and 750 kpc. Our results suggest that the distribution of stars enclosed within a certain radius forms a good proxy for the orientation of the dark matter within that radius, which has also been observed in hydrodynamical simulations.
  • We study the stellar-to-halo mass relation of central galaxies in the range 9.7<log_10(M_*/h^-2 M_sun)<11.7 and z<0.4, obtained from a combined analysis of the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS) and the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. We use ~100 deg^2 of KiDS data to study the lensing signal around galaxies for which spectroscopic redshifts and stellar masses were determined by GAMA. We show that lensing alone results in poor constraints on the stellar-to-halo mass relation due to a degeneracy between the satellite fraction and the halo mass, which is lifted when we simultaneously fit the stellar mass function. At M_sun>5x10^10 h^-2 M_sun, the stellar mass increases with halo mass as ~M_h^0.25. The ratio of dark matter to stellar mass has a minimum at a halo mass of 8x10^11 h^-1 M_sun with a value of M_h/M_*=56_-10^+16 [h]. We also use the GAMA group catalogue to select centrals and satellites in groups with five or more members, which trace regions in space where the local matter density is higher than average, and determine for the first time the stellar-to-halo mass relation in these denser environments. We find no significant differences compared to the relation from the full sample, which suggests that the stellar-to-halo mass relation does not vary strongly with local density. Furthermore, we find that the stellar-to-halo mass relation of central galaxies can also be obtained by modelling the lensing signal and stellar mass function of satellite galaxies only, which shows that the assumptions to model the satellite contribution in the halo model do not significantly bias the stellar-to-halo mass relation. Finally, we show that the combination of weak lensing with the stellar mass function can be used to test the purity of group catalogues.
  • In many astrophysical settings covariance matrices of large datasets have to be determined empirically from a finite number of mock realisations. The resulting noise degrades inference and precludes it completely if there are fewer realisations than data points. This work applies a recently proposed non-linear shrinkage estimator of covariance to a realistic example from large-scale structure cosmology. After optimising its performance for the usage in likelihood expressions, the shrinkage estimator yields subdominant bias and variance comparable to that of the standard estimator with a factor $\sim 50$ less realisations. This is achieved without any prior information on the properties of the data or the structure of the covariance matrix, at negligible computational cost.
  • We investigate the impact of astrophysical systematics on cosmic shear cosmological parameter constraints from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS), and the concordance with cosmic microwave background measurements by Planck. We present updated CFHTLenS cosmic shear tomography measurements extended to degree scales using a covariance calibrated by a new suite of N-body simulations. We analyze these measurements with a new model fitting pipeline, accounting for key systematic uncertainties arising from intrinsic galaxy alignments, baryonic effects in the nonlinear matter power spectrum, and photometric redshift uncertainties. We examine the impact of the systematic degrees of freedom on the cosmological parameter constraints, both independently and jointly. When the systematic uncertainties are considered independently, the intrinsic alignment amplitude is the only degree of freedom that is substantially preferred by the data. When the systematic uncertainties are considered jointly, there is no consistently strong preference in favor of the more complex models. We quantify the level of concordance between the CFHTLenS and Planck datasets by employing two distinct data concordance tests, grounded in Bayesian evidence and information theory. We find that the two data concordance tests largely agree with one another, and that the level of concordance between the CFHTLenS and Planck datasets is sensitive to the exact details of the systematic uncertainties included in our analysis, ranging from decisive discordance to substantial concordance as the treatment of the systematic uncertainties becomes more conservative. The least conservative scenario is the one most favored by the cosmic shear data, but it is also the one that shows the greatest degree of discordance with Planck. The data and analysis code are public at https://github.com/sjoudaki/cfhtlens_revisited
  • We present a method to transform multivariate unimodal non-Gaussian posterior probability densities into approximately Gaussian ones via non-linear mappings, such as Box--Cox transformations and generalisations thereof. This permits an analytical reconstruction of the posterior from a point sample, like a Markov chain, and simplifies the subsequent joint analysis with other experiments. This way, a multivariate posterior density can be reported efficiently, by compressing the information contained in MCMC samples. Further, the model evidence integral (i.e. the marginal likelihood) can be computed analytically. This method is analogous to the search for normal parameters in the cosmic microwave background, but is more general. The search for the optimally Gaussianising transformation is performed computationally through a maximum-likelihood formalism; its quality can be judged by how well the credible regions of the posterior are reproduced. We demonstrate that our method outperforms kernel density estimates in this objective. Further, we select marginal posterior samples from Planck data with several distinct strongly non-Gaussian features, and verify the reproduction of the marginal contours. To demonstrate evidence computation, we Gaussianise the joint distribution of data from weak lensing and baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), for different cosmological models, and find a preference for flat $\Lambda$CDM. Comparing to values computed with the Savage-Dickey density ratio, and Population Monte Carlo, we find good agreement of our method within the spread of the other two.
  • We present the first measurement of individual cluster mass estimates using weak lensing size and flux magnification. Using data from the HST-STAGES survey of the A901/902 supercluster we detect the four known groups in the supercluster at high significance using magnification alone. We discuss the application of a fully Bayesian inference analysis, and investigate a broad range of potential systematics in the application of the method. We compare our results to a previous weak lensing shear analysis of the same field finding the recovered signal-to-noise of our magnification-only analysis to range from 45% to 110% of the signal-to-noise in the shear-only analysis. On a case-by-case basis we find consistent magnification and shear constraints on cluster virial radius, and finding that for the full sample, magnification constraints to be a factor $0.77 \pm 0.18$ lower than the shear measurements.
  • The alignments between galaxies, their underlying matter structures, and the cosmic web constitute vital ingredients for a comprehensive understanding of gravity, the nature of matter, and structure formation in the Universe. We provide an overview on the state of the art in the study of these alignment processes and their observational signatures, aimed at a non-specialist audience. The development of the field over the past one hundred years is briefly reviewed. We also discuss the impact of galaxy alignments on measurements of weak gravitational lensing, and discuss avenues for making theoretical and observational progress over the coming decade.
  • Galaxy shapes are not randomly oriented, rather they are statistically aligned in a way that can depend on formation environment, history and galaxy type. Studying the alignment of galaxies can therefore deliver important information about the physics of galaxy formation and evolution as well as the growth of structure in the Universe. In this review paper we summarise key measurements of galaxy alignments, divided by galaxy type, scale and environment. We also cover the statistics and formalism necessary to understand the observations in the literature. With the emergence of weak gravitational lensing as a precision probe of cosmology, galaxy alignments have taken on an added importance because they can mimic cosmic shear, the effect of gravitational lensing by large-scale structure on observed galaxy shapes. This makes galaxy alignments, commonly referred to as intrinsic alignments, an important systematic effect in weak lensing studies. We quantify the impact of intrinsic alignments on cosmic shear surveys and finish by reviewing practical mitigation techniques which attempt to remove contamination by intrinsic alignments.
  • The shapes of galaxies are not randomly oriented on the sky. During the galaxy formation and evolution process, environment has a strong influence, as tidal gravitational fields in the large-scale structure tend to align nearby galaxies. Additionally, events such as galaxy mergers affect the relative alignments of both the shapes and angular momenta of galaxies throughout their history. These "intrinsic galaxy alignments" are known to exist, but are still poorly understood. This review will offer a pedagogical introduction to the current theories that describe intrinsic galaxy alignments, including the apparent difference in intrinsic alignment between early- and late-type galaxies and the latest efforts to model them analytically. It will then describe the ongoing efforts to simulate intrinsic alignments using both N-body and hydrodynamic simulations. Due to the relative youth of this field, there is still much to be done to understand intrinsic galaxy alignments and this review summarises the current state of the field, providing a solid basis for future work.
  • The unknown nature of dark energy motivates continued cosmological tests of large-scale gravitational physics. We present a new consistency check based on the relative amplitude of non-relativistic galaxy peculiar motions, measured via redshift-space distortion, and the relativistic deflection of light by those same galaxies traced by galaxy-galaxy lensing. We take advantage of the latest generation of deep, overlapping imaging and spectroscopic datasets, combining the Red Cluster Sequence Lensing Survey (RCSLenS), the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS), the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We quantify the results using the "gravitational slip" statistic E_G, which we estimate as 0.48 +/- 0.10 at z=0.32 and 0.30 +/- 0.07 at z=0.57, the latter constituting the highest redshift at which this quantity has been determined. These measurements are consistent with the predictions of General Relativity, for a perturbed Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric in a Universe dominated by a cosmological constant, which are E_G = 0.41 and 0.36 at these respective redshifts. The combination of redshift-space distortion and gravitational lensing data from current and future galaxy surveys will offer increasingly stringent tests of fundamental cosmology.
  • The fundamental plane (FP) is a widely used tool to investigate the properties of early-type galaxies, and the tight relation between its parameters has spawned several cosmological applications, including its use as a distance indicator for peculiar velocity surveys and as a means to suppress intrinsic noise in cosmic size magnification measurements. Systematic trends with the large-scale structure across the FP could cause serious biases for these cosmological probes, but may also yield new insights into the early-type population. Here we report the first detection of spatial correlations among offsets in galaxy size from an FP that explicitly accounts for redshift trends, using a sample of about $95,000$ elliptical galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We show that these offsets correlate with the density field out to at least $10h^{-1}$Mpc at $4\sigma$ significance in a way that cannot be explained by systematic errors in galaxy size estimates. We propose a physical explanation for the correlations by dividing the sample into central, satellite, and field galaxies, identifying trends for each galaxy type separately. Central (satellite) galaxies lie on average above (below) the FP, which we argue could be due to a higher (lower) than average mass-to-light ratio. We fit a simple model to the correlations of FP residuals and use it to predict the impact on peculiar velocity power spectra, finding a contamination larger than $10\,\%$ for $k>0.04\,h/$Mpc. Moreover, cosmic magnification measurements based on an FP could be severely contaminated over a wide range of scales by the intrinsic FP correlations.
  • We measure the weak gravitational lensing shear power spectra and their cross-power in two photometric redshift bins from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). The measurements are performed directly in multipole space in terms of adjustable band powers. For the extraction of the band powers from the data we have implemented and extended a quadratic estimator, a maximum likelihood method that allows us to readily take into account irregular survey geometries, masks, and varying sampling densities. We find the 68 per cent credible intervals in the $\sigma_8$-$\Omega_{\rm m}$-plane to be marginally consistent with results from $Planck$ for a simple five parameter $\Lambda$CDM model. For the projected parameter $S_8 \equiv \sigma_8(\Omega_{\rm m}/0.3)^{0.5}$ we obtain a best-fitting value of $S_8 = 0.768_{-0.039}^{+0.045}$. This constraint is consistent with results from other CFHTLenS studies as well as the Dark Energy Survey. Our most conservative model, including modifications to the power spectrum due to baryon feedback and marginalization over photometric redshift errors, yields an upper limit on the total mass of three degenerate massive neutrinos of $\Sigma m_\nu < 4.53 \, {\rm eV}$ at 95 per cent credibility, while a Bayesian model comparison does not favour any model extension beyond a simple five parameter $\Lambda$CDM model. Combining the shear likelihood with $Planck$ breaks the $\sigma_8$-$\Omega_{\rm m}$-degeneracy and yields $\sigma_8=0.818 \pm 0.013$ and $\Omega_{\rm m} = 0.300 \pm 0.011$ which is fully consistent with results from $Planck$ alone.
  • Applying a transformation to a non-Gaussian field can enhance the information content of the resulting power spectrum, by reducing the correlations between Fourier modes. In the context of weak gravitational lensing, it has been shown that this gain in information content is significantly compromised by the presence of shape noise. We apply clipping to mock convergence fields, a technique which is known to be robust in the presence of noise and has been successfully applied to galaxy number density fields. When analysed in isolation the resulting convergence power spectrum returns degraded constraints on cosmological parameters. However substantial gains can be achieved by performing a combined analysis of the power spectra derived from both the original and transformed fields. Even in the presence of realistic levels of shape noise, we demonstrate that this approach is capable of reducing the area of likelihood contours within the $\Omega_m - \sigma_8$ plane by more than a factor of three.
  • We present weak lensing constraints on the ellipticity of galaxy-scale matter haloes and the galaxy-halo misalignment. Using data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS), we measure the weighted-average ratio of the aligned projected ellipticity components of galaxy matter haloes and their embedded galaxies, $f_\mathrm{h}$, split by galaxy type. We then compare our observations to measurements taken from the Millennium Simulation, assuming different models of galaxy-halo misalignment. Using the Millennium Simulation we verify that the statistical estimator used removes contamination from cosmic shear. We also detect an additional signal in the simulation, which we interpret as the impact of intrinsic shape-shear alignments between the lenses and their large-scale structure environment. These alignments are likely to have caused some of the previous observational constraints on $f_\mathrm{h}$ to be biased high. From CFHTLenS we find $f_\mathrm{h}=-0.04 \pm 0.25$ for early-type galaxies, which is consistent with current models for the galaxy-halo misalignment predicting $f_\mathrm{h}\simeq 0.20$. For late-type galaxies we measure $f_\mathrm{h}=0.69_{-0.36}^{+0.37}$ from CFHTLenS. This can be compared to the simulated results which yield $f_\mathrm{h}\simeq 0.02$ for misaligned late-type models.
  • We use the first 100 sq. deg. of overlap between the Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) and the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey to determine the galaxy halo mass of ~10,000 spectroscopically-confirmed satellite galaxies in massive ($M > 10^{13}h^{-1}{\rm M}_\odot$) galaxy groups. Separating the sample as a function of projected distance to the group centre, we jointly model the satellites and their host groups with Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) density profiles, fully accounting for the data covariance. The probed satellite galaxies in these groups have total masses $\log M_{\rm sub} /(h^{-1}{\rm M}_\odot) \approx 11.7 - 12.2$ consistent across group-centric distance within the errorbars. Given their typical stellar masses, $\log M_{\rm \star,sat}/(h^{-2}{\rm M}_\odot) \sim 10.5$, such total masses imply stellar mass fractions of $M_{\rm \star,sat} /M_{\rm sub} \approx 0.04 h^{-1}$ . The average subhalo hosting these satellite galaxies has a mass $M_{\rm sub} \sim 0.015M_{\rm host}$ independent of host halo mass, in broad agreement with the expectations of structure formation in a $\Lambda$CDM universe.
  • The Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) is an optical wide-field imaging survey carried out with the VLT Survey Telescope and the OmegaCAM camera. KiDS will image 1500 square degrees in four filters (ugri), and together with its near-infrared counterpart VIKING will produce deep photometry in nine bands. Designed for weak lensing shape and photometric redshift measurements, the core science driver of the survey is mapping the large-scale matter distribution in the Universe back to a redshift of ~0.5. Secondary science cases are manifold, covering topics such as galaxy evolution, Milky Way structure, and the detection of high-redshift clusters and quasars. KiDS is an ESO Public Survey and dedicated to serving the astronomical community with high-quality data products derived from the survey data, as well as with calibration data. Public data releases will be made on a yearly basis, the first two of which are presented here. For a total of 148 survey tiles (~160 sq.deg.) astrometrically and photometrically calibrated, coadded ugri images have been released, accompanied by weight maps, masks, source lists, and a multi-band source catalog. A dedicated pipeline and data management system based on the Astro-WISE software system, combined with newly developed masking and source classification software, is used for the data production of the data products described here. The achieved data quality and early science projects based on the data products in the first two data releases are reviewed in order to validate the survey data. Early scientific results include the detection of nine high-z QSOs, fifteen candidate strong gravitational lenses, high-quality photometric redshifts and galaxy structural parameters for hundreds of thousands of galaxies. (Abridged)