• We explore the connections between stellar age, chemistry, and kinematics across a Galactocentric distance of $7.5 < R\,(\mathrm{kpc}) < 9.0$, using a sample of $\sim 12\,000$ intermediate-mass (FGK) turnoff stars observed with the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) survey. The kinematics of this sample are determined using radial velocity measurements from RAVE, and parallax and proper motion measurements from the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS). In addition, ages for RAVE stars are determined using a Bayesian method, taking TGAS parallaxes as a prior. We divide our sample into young ($0 < \tau < 3$ Gyr) and old ($8 < \tau < 13$ Gyr) populations, and then consider different metallicity bins for each of these age groups. We find significant differences in kinematic trends of young and old, metal-poor and metal-rich, stellar populations. In particular, we find a strong metallicity dependence in the mean Galactocentric radial velocity as a function of radius ($\partial {V_{\rm R}}/\partial R$) for young stars, with metal-rich stars having a much steeper gradient than metal-poor stars. For $\partial {V_{\phi}}/\partial R$, young, metal-rich stars significantly lag the LSR with a slightly positive gradient, while metal-poor stars show a negative gradient above the LSR. We interpret these findings as correlations between metallicity and the relative contributions of the non-axisymmetries in the Galactic gravitational potential (the spiral arms and the bar) to perturb stellar orbits.
  • The observed tightness of the mass discrepancy-acceleration relation (MDAR) poses a fine-tuning challenge to current models of galaxy formation. We propose that this relation could arise from collisional interactions between baryons and dark matter (DM) particles, without the need for modification of gravity or ad hoc feedback processes. We assume that these interactions satisfy the following three conditions: (i) the relaxation time of DM particles is comparable to the dynamical time in disk galaxies; (ii) DM exchanges energy with baryons due to elastic collisions; (iii) the product between the baryon-DM cross section and the typical energy exchanged in a collision is inversely proportional to the DM number density. We present an example of a particle physics model that gives a DM-baryon cross section with the desired density and velocity dependence. Direct detection constraints require our DM particles to be either very light ($m << m_b$) or very heavy ($m >> m_b$), corresponding respectively to heating and cooling of DM by baryons. In both cases, our mechanism applies and an equilibrium configuration can in principle be reached. Here, we focus on the heavy DM/cooling case as it is technically simpler. Under these assumptions, we find that rotationally-supported disk galaxies could naturally settle to equilibrium configurations satisfying a MDAR at all radii without invoking finely tuned feedback processes. We also discuss issues related to the small scale clumpiness of baryons, as well as predictions for pressure-supported systems. We argue in particular that galaxy clusters do not follow the MDAR despite being DM-dominated because they have not reached their equilibrium configuration. Finally, we revisit existing phenomenological, astrophysical and cosmological constraints on baryon-DM interactions in light of the unusual density dependence of the cross section.
  • (abridged) The Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda (M31) galaxies possess rotating planes of satellites. Their formation has not been explained satisfactorily yet. It was suggested that the MW and M31 satellites are ancient tidal dwarf galaxies, which could explain their configuration. This suggestion gained support by an analytic backward calculation of the relative MW-M31 orbit in the MOND modified dynamics paradigm by Zhao et al. (2013) implying their close flyby 7-11 Gyr ago. Here we explore the Local Group history in MOND in more detail using a simplified first-ever self-consistent simulation. We note the features induced by the encounter in the simulation and identify their possible real counterparts. The simulation was set to approximately reproduce the observed MW and M31 masses, effective radii, separation, relative velocity and disk inclinations. We used the publicly available adaptive-mesh-refinement code Phantom of RAMSES. In the simulation, matter was transferred from the MW to M31 along a tidal tail. The encounter induced formation of several structures resembling the peculiarities of the Local Group. Most notably: 1) A rotating planar structure formed around M31 from the transferred material. It had a size similar to the observed satellite plane and was oriented edge-on to the simulated MW, just as the real one. 2) The same structure also resembled the tidal features observed around M31 by its size and morphology. 3) A warp in the MW developed with an amplitude and orientation similar to that observed. 4) A cloud of particles formed around the simulated MW, with the extent of the actual MW satellite system. The encounter did not end by merging in a Hubble time. The simulation thus demonstrated that MOND can possibly explain many peculiarities of the Local Group and, moreover, that non-merging galaxy encounters in MOND can produce tidal features in galaxies.
  • The radial velocity (RV) of a single star is easily obtained from cross-correlation of the spectrum with a template, but the treatment of double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2s) is more difficult. Two different approaches were applied to a set of SB2s: the fit of the cross-correlation function with two normal distributions, and the cross-correlation with two templates, derived with the TODCOR code. It appears that the minimum masses obtained through the two methods are sometimes rather different, although their estimated uncertainties are roughly equal. Moreover, both methods induce a shift in the zero point of the secondary RVs, but it is less pronounced for TODCOR. All-in-all the comparison between the two methods is in favour of TODCOR.
  • Accurate stellar masses are requested in order to improve our understanding of stellar interiors, but they are still rather rare. Fortunately, the forthcoming Gaia Mission will provide astrometric measurements permitting the derivation of the orbital inclinations of nearby binaries which are also observed as double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2s) with ground-based telescopes. A programme of radial velocity (RV) measurements was initiated in 2010 with the Sophie spectrograph of the Haute-Provence observatory in order to derive accurate SB2 orbits for a large set of stars. Therefore, combined SB2+astrometric orbits will be derived thanks to Gaia, and masses with errors around 1~\% are expected for both components. The programme includes 70 SB2s, and the accurate SB2 orbits of 24 of them were already derived. In addition, two complementary programmes devoted to southern stars or to late-type dwarf stars were also initiated with the HERMES and the CARMENES spectrographs, respectively. Interferometric measurements were obained with the VLTI/PIONIER for 7 SB2s, and were taken from other sources for 4 others. Currently, combined "visual binary" (VB) +SB2 solutions were derived for 7 binaries, leading to the masses of the components and to the parallaxes. The parallaxes from the Hipparcos 2 catalogue were corrected for orbital motion and compared to our solution, confirming the high quality of Hipparcos 2.
  • It has recently been proposed, by assuming that dark matter is a superfluid, that MOND-like effects can be achieved on small scales whilst preserving the success of $\Lambda$CDM on large scales. Here we aim to provide the first set of spherical models of galaxy clusters in the context of superfluid dark matter. We first outline the theoretical structure of the superfluid core and the surrounding "normal phase" dark halo of quasi-particles in thermal equlibrium. The latter should encompass the largest part of galaxy clusters. Here, we set the SfDM transition at the radius where the density and pressure of the superfluid and normal phase coincides, neglecting the effect of phonons in the suprefluid core. We then apply the theory to a sample of galaxy clusters, and directly compare the SfDM predicted mass profiles to data. We find that the superfluid formulation can reproduce the X-ray dynamical mass profile of clusters. The SfDM fits however display slight under-predictions of the gravity in the central regions which might be partly related to our neglecting of the effect of phonons in these regions. We conclude that this superfluid formulation is successful in describing galaxy clusters, but further work will be needed to determine whether the parameter choice is consistent with galaxies. Our model could be made more realistic by exploring non-sphericity and the SfDM transition condition we impose.
  • Kinematically cold tidal streams of globular clusters (GC) are excellent tracers of the Galactic gravitational potential at moderate Galactocentric distances, and can also be used as probes of the law of gravity on Galactic scales. Here, we compare for the first time the generation of such streams in Newtonian and Milgromian gravity (MOND). We first compute analytical results to investigate the expected shape of the GC gravitational potential in both frameworks, and we then run N-body simulations with the Phantom of Ramses code. We find that the GCs tend to become lopsided in MOND. This is a consequence of the external field effect which breaks the strong equivalence principle. When the GC is filling its tidal radius the lopsidedness generates a strongly asymmetric tidal stream. In Newtonian dynamics, such markedly asymmetric streams can in general only be the consequence of interactions with dark matter subhalos, giant molecular clouds, or interaction with the Galactic bar. In these Newtonian cases, the asymmetry is the consequence of a very large gap in the stream, whilst in MOND it is a true asymmetry. This should thus allow us in the future to distinguish these different scenarios by making deep observations of the environment of the asymmetric stellar stream of Palomar 5. Moreover, our simulations indicate that the high internal velocity dispersion of Palomar 5 for its small stellar mass would be natural in MOND.
  • The existence of a spatially thin, kinematically coherent Disk of Satellites (DoS) around the Milky Way (MW), is a problem that often garners vivacious debate in the literature or at scientific meetings. One of the most recent incarnations of this wrangle occurred with two papers by Maji et al, who argued that these structures "maybe a misinterpretation of the data". These claims are in stark contrast to previous works. Motivated by this and other recent publications on this problem, we discuss necessary considerations to make, observational effects to consider, and pitfalls to avoid when investigating satellite galaxy planes such as the MW's DoS. In particular, we emphasize that conclusions need to have a statistical basis including a determination of the significance of satellite alignments, observational biases must not be ignored, and measurement errors (e.g. for proper motions) need to be considered. We discuss general problems faced by attempts to determine the dynamical stability of the DoS via orbit integrations of MW satellite galaxies, and demonstrate that to interpret simulations, it is helpful to compare them with a null case of isotropically distributed satellite positions and velocities. Based on these criteria, we find that the conclusions of Maji et al. do not hold up to scrutiny, and that their hydrodynamic cosmological simulation of a single host shows no evidence for a significant kinematic coherence among the simulated satellite galaxies, in contrast to the observed MW system.
  • The Canada-France Imaging Survey (CFIS) will map the northern high Galactic latitude sky in the $u$-band ("CFIS-u", 10,000$\, {\rm deg^2}$) and in the $r$-band ("CFIS-r", 5,000$\, {\rm deg^2}$), enabling a host of stand-alone science investigations, and providing some of the ground-based data necessary for photometric redshift determination for the Euclid mission. In this first contribution we present the $u$-band component of the survey, describe the observational strategy, and discuss some first highlight results, based on approximately one third of the final area. We show that the Galactic anticenter structure is distributed continuously along the line of sight, out to beyond 20 kpc, and possesses a metallicity distribution that is essentially identical to that of the outer disk sampled by APOGEE. This suggests that it is probably a buckled disk of old metal-rich stars, rather than a stream or a flare. We also discuss the future potential for CFIS-u in discovering star-forming dwarf galaxies around the Local Group, the characterization of the white dwarf and blue straggler population of the Milky Way, as well as its sensitivity to low-surface brightness structures in external galaxies.
  • We present the chemical distribution of the Milky Way, based on 2,900$\, {\rm deg^2}$ of $u$-band photometry taken as part of the Canada-France Imaging Survey. When complete, this survey will cover 10,000$\, {\rm deg^2}$ of the Northern sky. By combing the CFHT $u$-band photometry together with SDSS and Pan-STARRS $g,r,$ and $i$, we demonstrate that we are able to measure reliably the metallicities of individual stars to $\sim 0.2$ dex, and hence additionally obtain good photometric distance estimates. This survey thus permits the measurement of metallicities and distances of the dominant main-sequence population out to approximately 30 kpc, and provides much higher number of stars at large extraplanar distances than have been available from previous surveys. We develop a non-parametric distance-metallicity decomposition algorithm and apply it to the sky at $30\deg < |b| < 70\deg$ and to the North Galactic Cap. We find that the metallicity-distance distribution is well-represented by three populations whose metallicity distributions do not vary significantly with vertical height above the disk. As traced in main-sequence stars, the stellar halo component shows a vertical density profile that is close to exponential, with a scale height of around 3 kpc. This may indicate that the inner halo was formed partly from disk stars ejected in an ancient minor merger.
  • The present-day response of a Galactic disc stellar population to a non-axisymmetric perturbation of the potential has previously been computed through perturbation theory within the phase-space coordinates of the unperturbed axisymmetric system. Such an Eulerian linearized treatment however leads to singularities at resonances, which prevent quantitative comparisons with data. Here, we manage to capture the behaviour of the distribution function (DF) at a resonance in a Lagrangian approach, by averaging the Hamiltonian over fast angle variables and re-expressing the DF in terms of a new set of canonical actions and angles variables valid in the resonant region. We then follow the prescription of Binney (2016), assigning to the resonant DF the time average along the orbits of the axisymmetric DF expressed in the new set of actions and angles. This boils down to phase-mixing the DF in terms of the new angles, such that the DF for trapped orbits only depends on the new set of actions. This opens the way to quantitatively fitting the effects of the bar and spirals to Gaia data in terms of distribution functions in action space.
  • Tidal streams of disrupting dwarf galaxies orbiting around their host galaxy offer a unique way to constrain the shape of galactic gravitational potentials. Such streams can be used as leaning tower gravitational experiments on galactic scales. The most well motivated modification of gravity proposed as an alternative to dark matter on galactic scales is Milgromian dynamics (MOND), and we present here the first ever N-body simulations of the dynamical evolution of the disrupting Sagittarius dwarf galaxy in this framework. Using a realistic baryonic mass model for the Milky Way, we attempt to reproduce the present-day spatial and kinematic structure of the Sagittarius dwarf and its immense tidal stream that wraps around the Milky Way. With very little freedom on the original structure of the progenitor, constrained by the total luminosity of the Sagittarius structure and by the observed stellar mass-size relation for isolated dwarf galaxies, we find reasonable agreement between our simulations and observations of this system. The observed stellar velocities in the leading arm can be reproduced if we include a massive hot gas corona around the Milky Way that is flattened in the direction of the principal plane of its satellites. This is the first time that tidal dissolution in MOND has been tested rigorously at these mass and acceleration scales.
  • It was recently proposed that the effects usually attributed to particle dark matter on galaxy scales are due to the displacement of dark energy by baryonic matter, a paradigm known as emergent gravity. This formalism leads to predictions similar to Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) in spherical symmetry, but not quite identical. In particular, it leads to a well defined transition between the Newtonian and the modified gravitational regimes, a transition depending on both the Newtonian acceleration and its first derivative with respect to radius. Under the hypothesis of the applicability of this transition to aspherical systems, we investigate whether it can reproduce observed galaxy rotation curves. We conclude that the formula leads to marginally acceptable fits with strikingly low best-fit distances, low stellar mass-to-light ratios, and a low Hubble constant. In particular, some unobserved wiggles are produced in rotation curves because of the dependence of the transition on the derivative of the Newtonian acceleration, leading, even in the most favorable case, to systematically less good fits than MOND. Then, applying the predicted transition from emergent gravity in a regime where it should a priori be applicable, i.e. in spherical symmetry and outside of the bulk of matter, we show that the predictions for the secular advances of Solar System planets' perihelia are discrepant with the data by seven orders of magnitude, ruling out the present emergent gravity weak-field formula with high confidence.
  • We report on the detection of a small overdensity of stars in velocity space with systematically higher Galactocentric rotation velocity than the Sun by about 20 km s$^{-1}$ in the $Gaia$ Data Release 1 Tycho-Gaia astrometric solution (TGAS) data. We find these fast Galactic rotators more clearly outside of the Solar radius, compared to inside of the Solar radius. In addition, the velocity of the fast Galactic rotators is independent of the Galactocentric distance up to $R-R_{\odot}\sim0.6$ kpc. Comparing with numerical models, we qualitatively discuss that a possible cause of this feature is the co-rotation resonance of the Perseus spiral arm, where the stars in peri-centre phase in the trailing side of the Perseus spiral arm experience an extended period of acceleration owing to the torque from the Perseus arm.
  • The length and pattern speed of the Milky Way bar are still controversial. Photometric and spectroscopic surveys of the inner Galaxy, as well as gas kinematics, favour a long and slowly rotating bar, with corotation around a Galactocentric radius of 6 kpc. On the other hand, the existence of the Hercules stream in local velocity space favours a short and fast bar with corotation around 4 kpc. This follows from the fact that the Hercules stream looks like a typical signature of the outer Lindblad resonance of the bar. As we showed recently, reconciling this local stream with a slow bar would need to find a yet unknown alternative explanation, based for instance on the effect of spiral arms. Here, by combining the TGAS catalogue of the Gaia DR1 with LAMOST radial velocities, we show that the position of Hercules in velocity space as a function of radius in the outer Galaxy indeed varies exactly as predicted by fast bar models with a pattern speed no less than 1.8 times the circular frequency at the Sun's position.
  • Data Release 5 (DR5) of the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) is the fifth data release from a magnitude-limited (9< I < 12) survey of stars randomly selected in the southern hemisphere. The RAVE medium-resolution spectra ($R\sim7500$) covering the Ca-triplet region (8410-8795\AA) span the complete time frame from the start of RAVE observations in 2003 to their completion in 2013. Radial velocities from 520,781 spectra of 457,588 unique stars are presented, of which 255,922 stellar observations have parallaxes and proper motions from the Tycho-Gaia astrometric solution (TGAS) in Gaia DR1. For our main DR5 catalog, stellar parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, and overall metallicity) are computed using the RAVE DR4 stellar pipeline, but calibrated using recent K2 Campaign 1 seismic gravities and Gaia benchmark stars, as well as results obtained from high-resolution studies. Also included are temperatures from the Infrared Flux Method, and we provide a catalogue of red giant stars in the dereddened color $(J-Ks)_0$ interval (0.50,0.85) for which the gravities were calibrated based only on seismology. Further data products for sub-samples of the RAVE stars include individual abundances for Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, and Ni, and distances found using isochrones. Each RAVE spectrum is complemented by an error spectrum, which has been used to determine uncertainties on the parameters. The data can be accessed via the RAVE Web site or the Vizier database.
  • Both the three-dimensional density of red clump giants and the gas kinematics in the inner Galaxy indicate that the pattern speed of the Galactic bar could be much lower than previously estimated. Here, we show that such slow bar models are unable to reproduce the bimodality observed in local stellar velocity space. We do so by computing the response of stars in the Solar neighbourhood to the gravitational potential of slow and fast bars, in terms of their perturbed distribution function in action-angle space up to second order, as well as by identifying resonantly trapped orbits. We also check that the bimodality is unlikely to be produced through perturbations from spiral arms, and conclude that, contrary to gas kinematics, local stellar kinematics still favour a fast bar in the Milky Way, with a pattern speed of the order of almost twice (and no less than 1.8 times) the circular frequency at the Sun's position. This leaves open the question of the nature of the long flat extension of the bar in the Milky Way.
  • Together with interstellar turbulence, gravitation is one key player in star formation. It acts both at galactic scales in the assembly of gas into dense clouds, and inside those structures for their collapse and the formation of pre-stellar cores. To understand to what extent the large scale dynamics govern the star formation activity of galaxies, we present hydrodynamical simulations in which we generalise the behaviour of gravity to make it differ from Newtonian dynamics in the low acceleration regime. We focus on the extreme cases of interacting galaxies, and compare the evolution of galaxy pairs in the dark matter paradigm to that in the Milgromian Dynamics (MOND) framework. Following up on the seminal work by Tiret & Combes, this paper documents the first simulations of galaxy encounters in MOND with a detailed Eulerian hydrodynamical treatment of baryonic physics, including star formation and stellar feedback. We show that similar morphologies of the interacting systems can be produced by both the dark matter and MOND formalisms, but require a much slower orbital velocity in the MOND case. Furthermore, we find that the star formation activity and history are significantly more extended in space and time in MOND interactions, in particular in the tidal debris. Such differences could be used as observational diagnostics and make interacting galaxies prime objects in the study of the nature of gravitation at galactic scales.
  • We investigate models of the Milky Way disc taking into account simultaneously the bar and a two-armed quasi-static spiral pattern. Away from major resonance overlaps, the mean stellar radial motions in the plane are essentially a linear superposition of the isolated effects of the bar and spirals. Thus, provided the bar is strong enough, even in the presence of spiral arms, these mean radial motions are predominantly affected by the Galactic bar for large scale velocity fluctuations. This is evident when comparing the peculiar line-of-sight velocity power spectrum of our coupled models with bar-only models. However, we show how forthcoming spectroscopic surveys could disentangle bar-only non-axisymmetric models of the Galaxy from models in which spiral arms have a significant amplitude. We also point out that overlaps of low-order resonances are sufficient to enhance stellar churning within the disc, even when the spirals amplitude is kept constant. Nevertheless, for churning to be truly non-local, stronger or (more likely) transient amplitudes would be needed: otherwise the disc is actually mostly unaffected by churning in the present models. Finally, regarding vertical breathing modes, the combined effect of the bar and spirals on vertical motions is a clear non-linear superposition of the isolated effects of both components, significantly superseding the linear superposition of modes produced by each perturber separately, thereby providing an additional effect to consider when analysing the observed breathing mode of the Galactic disc in the extended Solar neighbourhood.
  • Starting from an axisymmetric equilibrium distribution function (DF) in action space, representing a Milky Way thin disc stellar population, we use the linearized Boltzmann equation to explicitly compute the response to a three-dimensional spiral potential in terms of the perturbed DF. This DF, valid away from the main resonances, allows us to investigate a snapshot of the velocity distribution at any given point in three-dimensional configuration space. Moreover, the first order moments of the DF give rise to non-zero radial and vertical bulk flows -- namely breathing modes -- qualitatively similar to those recently observed in the extended Solar neighbourhood. We show that these analytically predicted mean stellar motions are in agreement with the outcome of test-particle simulations. Moreover, we estimate for the first time the reduction factor for the vertical bulk motions of a stellar population compared to the case of a cold fluid. Such an explicit expression for the full perturbed DF of a thin disc stellar population in the presence of spiral arms will be helpful in order to dynamically interpret the detailed information on the Milky Way disc stellar kinematics that will be provided by upcoming large astrometric and spectroscopic surveys of the Galaxy.
  • We present an analysis of the presence of substructures in the stellar stream of the Palomar 5 globular cluster, as derived from Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. Using a matched filter technique, we recover the positions and sizes of overdensities reported in previous studies. To explore the reality of these structures, we also create an artificial model of the stream, in which we construct a realistic background on top of which we add a perfectly smooth stream structure, taking into account the effects of photometric completeness and interstellar extinction. We find that the smooth artificial stream then shows similarly-pronounced substructures as the real structure. Interestingly, our best-fit N-body simulation does display real projected density variations linked to stellar epicyclic motions, but these become less significant when taking into account the SDSS star-count constraints. The substructures found when applying our matched filter technique to the N-body particles converted into observable stars are thus mostly unrelated to these epicyclic motions. This analysis suggests that the majority of the previously-detected substructures along the tidal tail of Palomar 5 are artefacts of observational inhomogeneities.
  • In anticipation of the Gaia astrometric mission, a large sample of spectroscopic binaries has been observed since 2010 with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the Haute--Provence Observatory. Our aim is to derive the orbital elements of double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2s) with an accuracy sufficient to finally obtain the masses of the components with relative errors as small as 1 % when the astrometric measurements of Gaia are taken into account. In this paper we present the results from five years of observations of 10 SB2 systems with periods ranging from 37 to 881 days. Using the TODMOR algorithm we computed radial velocities from the spectra, and then derived the orbital elements of these binary systems. The minimum masses of the components are then obtained with an accuracy better than 1.2 % for the ten binaries. Combining the radial velocities with existing interferometric measurements, we derived the masses of the primary and secondary components of HIP 87895 with an accuracy of 0.98 % and 1.2 % respectively.
  • This article is the detailed version of a paper on dark matter, dark energy, and modified gravity, published in the December 2015-January 2016 special issue of "La Recherche" (in French)
  • We investigate the degree to which the inclusion of baryonic physics can overcome two long-standing problems of the standard cosmological model on galaxy scales: (i) the problem of satellite planes around Local Group galaxies, and (ii) the "too big to fail" problem. By comparing dissipational and dissipationless simulations, we find no indication that the addition of baryonic physics results in more flattened satellite distributions around Milky-Way-like systems. Recent claims to the contrary are shown to derive in part from a non-standard metric for the degree of flattening, which ignores the satellites' radial positions. If the full 3D positions of the satellite galaxies are considered, none of the simulations we analyse reproduce the observed flattening nor the observed degree of kinematic coherence of the Milky Way satellite system. Our results are consistent with the expectation that baryonic physics should have little or no influence on the structure of satellite systems on scales of hundreds of kiloparsecs. Claims that the "too big to fail" problem can be resolved by the addition of baryonic physics are also shown to be problematic.
  • The DiskMass survey recently provided measurements of the vertical velocity dispersions of disk stars in a sample of nearly face-on galaxies. By setting the disk scale-heights to be equal to those of edge-on galaxies with similar scale-lengths, it was found that these disks must be sub-maximal, with surprisingly low K-band mass-to-light ratios of the order of $M_\star/L_K \simeq 0.3 M_\odot/L_\odot$. This study made use of a simple relation between the disk surface density and the measured velocity dispersion and scale height of the disk, neglecting the shape of the rotation curve and the dark matter contribution to the vertical force, which can be especially important in the case of sub-maximal disks. Here, we point out that these simplifying assumptions led to an overestimation of the stellar mass-to-light ratios. Relaxing these assumptions, we compute even lower values than previously reported for the mass-to-light ratios, with a median $M_\star/L_K \simeq 0.18 M_\odot/L_\odot$, where 14 galaxies have $M_\star/L_K < 0.11$. Invoking prolate dark matter halos made only a small difference to the derived $M_\star/L_K$, although extreme prolate halos ($q>1.5$ for the axis ratios of the potential) might help. The cross-terms in the Jeans equation are also generally negligible. These deduced K-band stellar mass-to-light ratios are even more difficult to reconcile with stellar population synthesis models than the previously reported ones.