• Two different types of perturbations of the Lorenz 63 dynamical system for Rayleigh-Benard convection by multiplicative noise -- called stochastic advection by Lie transport (SALT) noise and fluctuation-dissipation (FD) noise -- are found to produce qualitatively different effects, possibly because the total phase-space volume contraction rates are different. In the process of making this comparison between effects of SALT and FD noise on the Lorenz 63 system, a stochastic version of a robust deterministic numerical algorithm for obtaining the individual numerical Lyapunov exponents was developed. With this stochastic version of the algorithm, the value of the sum of the Lyapunov exponents for the FD noise was found to differ significantly from the value of the deterministic Lorenz 63 system, whereas the SALT noise preserves the Lorenz 63 value with high accuracy. The Lagrangian averaged version of the SALT equations (LA SALT) is found to yield a closed deterministic subsystem for the expected solutions which is found to be isomorphic to the original Lorenz 63 dynamical system. The solutions of the closed chaotic subsystem, in turn, drive a linear stochastic system for the fluctuations of the LA SALT solutions around their expected values.
  • Computational codes for direct numerical simulations of Rayleigh-B\'enard (RB) convection are compared in terms of computational cost and quality of the solution. As a benchmark case, RB convection at $Ra=10^8$ and $Pr=1$ in a periodic domain, in cubic and cylindrical containers is considered. A dedicated second-order finite-difference code (AFID/RBflow) and a specialized fourth-order finite-volume code (Goldfish) are compared with a general purpose finite-volume approach (OpenFOAM) and a general purpose spectral-element code (Nek5000). Reassuringly, all codes provide predictions of the average heat transfer that converge to the same values. The computational costs, however, are found to differ considerably. The specialized codes AFID/RBflow and Goldfish are found to excel in efficiency, outperforming the general purpose flow solvers Nek5000 and OpenFOAM by an order of magnitude with an error on the Nusselt number $Nu$ below $5\%$. However, we find that $Nu$ alone is not sufficient to assess the quality of the numerical results: in fact, instantaneous snapshots of the temperature field from a near wall region obtained for deliberately under-resolved simulations using Nek5000 clearly indicate inadequate flow resolution even when $Nu$ is converged. Overall, dedicated special purpose codes for RB convection are found to be more efficient than general purpose codes.
  • Rotation modulates turbulence causing columnar structuring of a turbulent flow in case of sufficiently strong rotation. This yields significant changes in the flow characteristics and dispersion properties, which makes rotational turbulence modulation particularly relevant in the context of atmospheric and oceanic flows. Here we investigate the canonical flow of turbulence in a periodic box, subjected to rotation about a fixed vertical axis. As point of reference we consider direct numerical simulations of homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Modulation due to rotation at various rotation rates (i.e., different Rossby numbers) is investigated. Special attention is paid to the alteration of intermittency, which is measured in terms of changes in the scaling of the structure functions. A reduction of intermittency quantified with the longitudinal structure functions in the direction perpendicular to the rotation axes will be presented. These numerical findings correspond well to recent results obtained in experiments by Seiwert et al. (2008).
  • A new computational framework for the simulation of turbulent flow through complex objects and along irregular boundaries is presented. This is motivated by the application of metal foams in compact heat-transfer devices, or as catalyst substrates in process-engineering. The flow-consequences of such complicated objects are incorporated by adding explicit multiscale forcing to the Navier-Stokes equations. The forcing represents the simultaneous agitation of a wide spectrum of length-scales when flow passes through the complex object. It is found that a considerable modulation of the traditional energy cascading can be introduced with a specific forcing strategy. In spectral space, forcing yields strongly localized deviations from the common Kolmogorov scaling law, directly associated with the explicitly forced scales. In addition, the accumulated effect of forcing induces a significant non-local alteration of the kinetic energy including the spectrum for the large scales. Consequently, a manipulation of turbulent flow can be achieved over an extended range, well beyond the directly forced scales. The turbulent mixing of a passive scalar field is also investigated, in order to quantify the physical-space modifications of transport processes in multiscale forced turbulence. The surface-area and wrinkling of level-sets of the scalar field are monitored as measures of the influence of explicit forcing on the local and global mixing efficiency.
  • The response of turbulent flow to time-modulated forcing is studied by direct numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations. The large-scale forcing is modulated via periodic energy input variations at frequency $\omega$. The response is maximal for frequencies in the range of the inverse of the large eddy turnover time, confirming the mean-field predictions of von der Heydt, Grossmann and Lohse (Phys. Rev. E 67, 046308 (2003)). In accordance with the theory the response maximum shows only a small dependence on the Reynolds number and is also quite insensitive to the particular flow-quantity that is monitored, e.g., kinetic energy, dissipation-rate, or Taylor-Reynolds number. At sufficiently high frequencies the amplitude of the kinetic energy response decreases as $1/\omega$. For frequencies beyond the range of maximal response, a significant change in phase-shift relative to the time-modulated forcing is observed.
  • Mathematical regularisation of the nonlinear terms in the Navier-Stokes equations provides a systematic approach to deriving subgrid closures for numerical simulations of turbulent flow. By construction, these subgrid closures imply existence and uniqueness of strong solutions to the corresponding modelled system of equations. We will consider the large eddy interpretation of two such mathematical regularisation principles, i.e., Leray and LANS$-\alpha$ regularisation. The Leray principle introduces a {\bfi smoothed transport velocity} as part of the regularised convective nonlinearity. The LANS$-\alpha$ principle extends the Leray formulation in a natural way in which a {\bfi filtered Kelvin circulation theorem}, incorporating the smoothed transport velocity, is explicitly satisfied. These regularisation principles give rise to implied subgrid closures which will be applied in large eddy simulation of turbulent mixing. Comparison with filtered direct numerical simulation data, and with predictions obtained from popular dynamic eddy-viscosity modelling, shows that these mathematical regularisation models are considerably more accurate, at a lower computational cost.
  • A new formulation is derived for the commutator-errors in large-eddy simulation of incompressible flow. These commutator-errors arise from the application of non-uniform filters to the Navier-Stokes equations. As a consequence, the filtered velocity field is no longer solenoidal. The order of magnitude of the commutator-errors is compared with the divergence of the turbulent stresses. This shows that one can not reduce the size of the commutator-errors independently of the turbulent stress terms by some judicious construction of the filter operator. Similarity modeling for the commutator-errors is presented, including an extension of Bardina's approach and the application of Leray regularization. The performance of the commutator-error parameterization is illustrated with the one-dimensional Burgers equation. For large filter-width variations the Leray approach is shown to capture the filtered flow with better accuracy than is possible with Bardina's approach.
  • A new modeling approach for large-eddy simulation (LES) is obtained by combining a `regularization principle' with an explicit filter and its inversion. This regularization approach allows a systematic derivation of the implied subgrid-model, which resolves the closure problem. The central role of the filter in LES is fully restored, i.e., both the interpretation of LES predictions in terms of direct simulation results as well as the corresponding subgrid closure are specified by the filter. The regularization approach is illustrated with `Leray-smoothing' of the nonlinear convective terms. In turbulent mixing the new, implied subgrid model performs favorably compared to the dynamic eddy-viscosity procedure. The model is robust at arbitrarily high Reynolds numbers and correctly predicts self-similar turbulent flow development.
  • Buoyancy effects in unstably stratified mixing layers express themselves through gravity currents of heavy fluid which propagate in an ambient lighter fluid. These currents are encountered in numerous geophysical flows, industrial safety and environmental protection issues. During transition to turbulence a strong distortion of the separating interface between regions containing `heavy' or `light' fluid arises. The complexity of this interface will be used to monitor the progress of the mixing. We concentrate on the enhancement of surface-area and `surface-wrinkling' of the separating interface as a result of gravity-effects. We also show that this process can be simulated quite accurately using large-eddy simulation with dynamic subgrid modeling. However, the subgrid resolution, defined as the ratio between filter-width Delta and grid-spacing h, should be sufficiently high to avoid contamination due to spatial discretization error effects.
  • We consider so-called Leray regularization of the convective contributions. This gives rise to a subgrid parameterization which involves both explicit filtering and (approximate) inversion. The Leray model also arises from the alpha-modeling strategy derived via Kelvin's circulation theorem. We study the dynamics associated with the Leray model in a turbulent mixing layer and compare predictions with filtered DNS results and findings due to dynamic (mixed) models. In particular, the kinetic energy, momentum thickness and energy-spectra are analyzed, establishing favorable performance of the Leray model and robustness at arbitrarily high Reynolds number. This is unique for a similarity-type model that does not contain an explicit eddy-viscosity term.
  • The $\alpha$-modeling strategy is followed to derive a new subgrid parameterization of the turbulent stress tensor in large-eddy simulation (LES). The LES-$\alpha$ modeling yields an explicitly filtered subgrid parameterization which contains the filtered nonlinear gradient model as well as a model which represents `Leray-regularization'. The LES-$\alpha$ model is compared with similarity and eddy-viscosity models that also use the dynamic procedure. Numerical simulations of a turbulent mixing layer are performed using both a second order, and a fourth order accurate finite volume discretization. The Leray model emerges as the most accurate, robust and computationally efficient among the three LES-$\alpha$ subgrid parameterizations for the turbulent mixing layer. The evolution of the resolved kinetic energy is analyzed and the various subgrid-model contributions to it are identified. By comparing LES-$\alpha$ at different subgrid resolutions, an impression of finite volume discretization error dynamics is obtained.