• Methods of transfer learning try to combine knowledge from several related tasks (or domains) to improve performance on a test task. Inspired by causal methodology, we relax the usual covariate shift assumption and assume that it holds true for a subset of predictor variables: the conditional distribution of the target variable given this subset of predictors is invariant over all tasks. We show how this assumption can be motivated from ideas in the field of causality. We focus on the problem of Domain Generalization, in which no examples from the test task are observed. We prove that in an adversarial setting using this subset for prediction is optimal in Domain Generalization; we further provide examples, in which the tasks are sufficiently diverse and the estimator therefore outperforms pooling the data, even on average. If examples from the test task are available, we also provide a method to transfer knowledge from the training tasks and exploit all available features for prediction. However, we provide no guarantees for this method. We introduce a practical method which allows for automatic inference of the above subset and provide corresponding code. We present results on synthetic data sets and a gene deletion data set.
  • Structural causal models (SCMs), also known as (non-parametric) structural equation models (SEMs), are widely used for causal modeling purposes. A large body of theoretical results is available for the special case in which cycles are absent (i.e., acyclic SCMs, also known as recursive SEMs). However, in many application domains cycles are abundantly present, for example in the form of feedback loops. In this paper, we provide a general and rigorous theory of cyclic SCMs. The paper consists of two parts: the first part gives a rigorous treatment of structural causal models, dealing with measure-theoretic and other complications that arise in the presence of cycles. In contrast with the acyclic case, in cyclic SCMs solutions may no longer exist, or if they exist, they may no longer be unique, or even measurable in general. We give several sufficient and necessary conditions for the existence of (unique) measurable solutions. We show how causal reasoning proceeds in these models and how this differs from the acyclic case. Moreover, we give an overview of the Markov properties that hold for cyclic SCMs. In the second part, we address the question of how one can marginalize an SCM (possibly with cycles) to a subset of the endogenous variables. We show that under a certain condition, one can effectively remove a subset of the endogenous variables from the model, leading to a more parsimonious marginal SCM that preserves the causal and counterfactual semantics of the original SCM on the remaining variables. Moreover, we show how the marginalization relates to the latent projection and to latent confounders, i.e. latent common causes.
  • We lay theoretical foundations for new database release mechanisms that allow third-parties to construct consistent estimators of population statistics, while ensuring that the privacy of each individual contributing to the database is protected. The proposed framework rests on two main ideas. First, releasing (an estimate of) the kernel mean embedding of the data generating random variable instead of the database itself still allows third-parties to construct consistent estimators of a wide class of population statistics. Second, the algorithm can satisfy the definition of differential privacy by basing the released kernel mean embedding on entirely synthetic data points, while controlling accuracy through the metric available in a Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Space. We describe two instantiations of the proposed framework, suitable under different scenarios, and prove theoretical results guaranteeing differential privacy of the resulting algorithms and the consistency of estimators constructed from their outputs.
  • The modulation transfer function (MTF) is widely used to characterise the performance of optical systems. Measuring it is costly and it is thus rarely available for a given lens specimen. Instead, MTFs based on simulations or, at best, MTFs measured on other specimens of the same lens are used. Fortunately, images recorded through an optical system contain ample information about its MTF, only that it is confounded with the statistics of the images. This work presents a method to estimate the MTF of camera lens systems directly from photographs, without the need for expensive equipment. We use a custom grid display to accurately measure the point response of lenses to acquire ground truth training data. We then use the same lenses to record natural images and employ a data-driven supervised learning approach using a convolutional neural network to estimate the MTF on small image patches, aggregating the information into MTF charts over the entire field of view. It generalises to unseen lenses and can be applied for single photographs, with the performance improving if multiple photographs are available.
  • Clustering is a cornerstone of unsupervised learning which can be thought as disentangling multiple generative mechanisms underlying the data. In this paper we introduce an algorithmic framework to train mixtures of implicit generative models which we particularize for variational autoencoders. Relying on an additional set of discriminators, we propose a competitive procedure in which the models only need to approximate the portion of the data distribution from which they can produce realistic samples. As a byproduct, each model is simpler to train, and a clustering interpretation arises naturally from the partitioning of the training points among the models. We empirically show that our approach splits the training distribution in a reasonable way and increases the quality of the generated samples.
  • We consider a bivariate time series $(X_t,Y_t)$ that is given by a simple linear autoregressive model. Assuming that the equations describing each variable as a linear combination of past values are considered structural equations, there is a clear meaning of how intervening on one particular $X_t$ influences $Y_{t'}$ at later times $t'>t$. In the present work, we describe conditions under which one can define a causal model between variables that are coarse-grained in time, thus admitting statements like `setting $X$ to $x$ changes $Y$ in a certain way' without referring to specific time instances. We show that particularly simple statements follow in the frequency domain, thus providing meaning to interventions on frequencies.
  • Two popular examples of first-order optimization methods over linear spaces are coordinate descent and matching pursuit algorithms, with their randomized variants. While the former targets the optimization by moving along coordinates, the latter considers a generalized notion of directions. Exploiting the connection between the two algorithms, we present a unified analysis of both, providing affine invariant sublinear $\mathcal{O}(1/t)$ rates on smooth objectives and linear convergence on strongly convex objectives. As a byproduct of our affine invariant analysis of matching pursuit, our rates for steepest coordinate descent are the tightest known. Furthermore, we show the first accelerated convergence rate $\mathcal{O}(1/t^2)$ for matching pursuit on convex objectives.
  • We study machine learning-based assistants that support coordination between humans in congested facilities via congestion forecasts. In our theoretical analysis, we use game theory to study how an assistant's forecast that influences the outcome relates to Nash equilibria, and how they can be reached quickly in congestion game-like settings. Using information theory, we investigate approximations to given social choice functions under privacy constraints w.r.t. assistants. And we study dynamics and training for a specific exponential smoothing-based assistant via a linear dynamical systems and causal analysis. We report experiments conducted on a real congested cafeteria with about 400 daily customers where we evaluate this assistant and prediction baselines to gain further insight.
  • The amount of digitally available but heterogeneous information about the world is remarkable, and new technologies such as self-driving cars, smart homes, or the internet of things may further increase it. In this paper we present preliminary ideas about certain aspects of the problem of how such heterogeneous information can be harnessed by autonomous agents. After discussing potentials and limitations of some existing approaches, we investigate how \emph{experiments} can help to obtain a better understanding of the problem. Specifically, we present a simple agent that integrates video data from a different agent, and implement and evaluate a version of it on the novel experimentation platform \emph{Malmo}. The focus of a second investigation is on how information about the hardware of different agents, the agents' sensory data, and \emph{causal} information can be utilized for knowledge transfer between agents and subsequently more data-efficient decision making. Finally, we discuss potential future steps w.r.t.\ theory and experimentation, and formulate open questions.
  • The goal in extreme multi-label classification is to learn a classifier which can assign a small subset of relevant labels to an instance from an extremely large set of target labels. Datasets in extreme classification exhibit a long tail of labels which have small number of positive training instances. In this work, we pose the learning task in extreme classification with large number of tail-labels as learning in the presence of adversarial perturbations. This view motivates a robust optimization framework and equivalence to a corresponding regularized objective. Under the proposed robustness framework, we demonstrate efficacy of Hamming loss for tail-label detection in extreme classification. The equivalent regularized objective, in combination with proximal gradient based optimization, performs better than state-of-the-art methods on propensity scored versions of precision@k and nDCG@k(upto 20% relative improvement over PFastreXML - a leading tree-based approach and 60% relative improvement over SLEEC - a leading label-embedding approach). Furthermore, we also highlight the sub-optimality of a sparse solver in a widely used package for large-scale linear classification, which is interesting in its own right. We also investigate the spectral properties of label graphs for providing novel insights towards understanding the conditions governing the performance of Hamming loss based one-vs-rest scheme vis-\`a-vis label embedding methods.
  • Generative adversarial networks (GANs) have been shown to produce realistic samples from high-dimensional distributions, but training them is considered hard. A possible explanation for training instabilities is the inherent imbalance between the networks: While the discriminator is trained directly on both real and fake samples, the generator only has control over the fake samples it produces since the real data distribution is fixed by the choice of a given dataset. We propose a simple modification that gives the generator control over the real samples which leads to a tempered learning process for both generator and discriminator. The real data distribution passes through a lens before being revealed to the discriminator, balancing the generator and discriminator by gradually revealing more detailed features necessary to produce high-quality results. The proposed module automatically adjusts the learning process to the current strength of the networks, yet is generic and easy to add to any GAN variant. In a number of experiments, we show that this can improve quality, stability and/or convergence speed across a range of different GAN architectures (DCGAN, LSGAN, WGAN-GP).
  • We address the problem of inferring the causal relation between two variables by comparing the least-squares errors of the predictions in both possible causal directions. Under the assumption of an independence between the function relating cause and effect, the conditional noise distribution, and the distribution of the cause, we show that the errors are smaller in causal direction if both variables are equally scaled and the causal relation is close to deterministic. Based on this, we provide an easily applicable algorithm that only requires a regression in both possible causal directions and a comparison of the errors. The performance of the algorithm is compared with different related causal inference methods in various artificial and real-world data sets.
  • Statistical learning relies upon data sampled from a distribution, and we usually do not care what actually generated it in the first place. From the point of view of causal modeling, the structure of each distribution is induced by physical mechanisms that give rise to dependencies between observables. Mechanisms, however, can be meaningful autonomous modules of generative models that make sense beyond a particular entailed data distribution, lending themselves to transfer between problems. We develop an algorithm to recover a set of independent (inverse) mechanisms from a set of transformed data points. The approach is unsupervised and based on a set of experts that compete for data generated by the mechanisms, driving specialization. We analyze the proposed method in a series of experiments on image data. Each expert learns to map a subset of the transformed data back to a reference distribution. The learned mechanisms generalize to novel domains. We discuss implications for transfer learning and links to recent trends in generative modeling.
  • Over the past four years, neural networks have proven vulnerable to adversarial images: targeted but imperceptible image perturbations lead to drastically different predictions. We show that adversarial vulnerability increases with the gradients of the training objective when seen as a function of the inputs. For most current network architectures, we prove that the $\ell_1$-norm of these gradients grows as the square root of the input-size. These nets therefore become increasingly vulnerable with growing image size. Over the course of our analysis we rediscover and generalize double-backpropagation, a technique that penalizes large gradients in the loss surface to reduce adversarial vulnerability and increase generalization performance. We show that this regularization-scheme is equivalent at first order to training with adversarial noise. Finally, we demonstrate that replacing strided by average-pooling layers decreases adversarial vulnerability. Our proofs rely on the network's weight-distribution at initialization, but extensive experiments confirm their conclusions after training.
  • Recent work on fairness in machine learning has focused on various statistical discrimination criteria and how they trade off. Most of these criteria are observational: They depend only on the joint distribution of predictor, protected attribute, features, and outcome. While convenient to work with, observational criteria have severe inherent limitations that prevent them from resolving matters of fairness conclusively. Going beyond observational criteria, we frame the problem of discrimination based on protected attributes in the language of causal reasoning. This viewpoint shifts attention from "What is the right fairness criterion?" to "What do we want to assume about the causal data generating process?" Through the lens of causality, we make several contributions. First, we crisply articulate why and when observational criteria fail, thus formalizing what was before a matter of opinion. Second, our approach exposes previously ignored subtleties and why they are fundamental to the problem. Finally, we put forward natural causal non-discrimination criteria and develop algorithms that satisfy them.
  • Difference imaging or image subtraction is a method that measures differential photometry by matching the pointing and point-spread function (PSF) between image frames. It is used for the detection of time-variable phenomena. Here we present a new category of method---CPM Difference Imaging, in which differences are not measured between matched images but instead between image frames and a data-driven predictive model that has been designed only to predict the pointing, PSF, and detector effects but not astronomical variability. In CPM Difference Imaging each pixel is modelled by the Causal Pixel Model (CPM) originally built for modeling Kepler data, in which pixel values are predicted by a linear combination of other pixels at the same epoch but far enough away such that these pixels are causally disconnected, astrophysically. It does not require that the user have any explicit model or description of the pointing or point-spread function of any of the images. Its principal drawback is that---in its current form---it requires an imaging campaign with many epochs and fairly stable telescope pointing. The method is applied to simulated data and also the K2 Campaign 9 microlensing data. We show that CPM Difference Imaging can detect variable objects and produce precise differentiate photometry in a crowded field. CPM Difference Imaging is capable of producing image differences at nearly photon-noise precision.
  • As handheld video cameras are now commonplace and available in every smartphone, images and videos can be recorded almost everywhere at anytime. However, taking a quick shot frequently yields a blurry result due to unwanted camera shake during recording or moving objects in the scene. Removing these artifacts from the blurry recordings is a highly ill-posed problem as neither the sharp image nor the motion blur kernel is known. Propagating information between multiple consecutive blurry observations can help restore the desired sharp image or video. Solutions for blind deconvolution based on neural networks rely on a massive amount of ground-truth data which is hard to acquire. In this work, we propose an efficient approach to produce a significant amount of realistic training data and introduce a novel recurrent network architecture to deblur frames taking temporal information into account, which can efficiently handle arbitrary spatial and temporal input sizes. We demonstrate the versatility of our approach in a comprehensive comparison on a number of challening real-world examples.
  • Single image super-resolution is the task of inferring a high-resolution image from a single low-resolution input. Traditionally, the performance of algorithms for this task is measured using pixel-wise reconstruction measures such as peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) which have been shown to correlate poorly with the human perception of image quality. As a result, algorithms minimizing these metrics tend to produce over-smoothed images that lack high-frequency textures and do not look natural despite yielding high PSNR values. We propose a novel application of automated texture synthesis in combination with a perceptual loss focusing on creating realistic textures rather than optimizing for a pixel-accurate reproduction of ground truth images during training. By using feed-forward fully convolutional neural networks in an adversarial training setting, we achieve a significant boost in image quality at high magnification ratios. Extensive experiments on a number of datasets show the effectiveness of our approach, yielding state-of-the-art results in both quantitative and qualitative benchmarks.
  • Complex systems can be modelled at various levels of detail. Ideally, causal models of the same system should be consistent with one another in the sense that they agree in their predictions of the effects of interventions. We formalise this notion of consistency in the case of Structural Equation Models (SEMs) by introducing exact transformations between SEMs. This provides a general language to consider, for instance, the different levels of description in the following three scenarios: (a) models with large numbers of variables versus models in which the `irrelevant' or unobservable variables have been marginalised out; (b) micro-level models versus macro-level models in which the macro-variables are aggregate features of the micro-variables; (c) dynamical time series models versus models of their stationary behaviour. Our analysis stresses the importance of well specified interventions in the causal modelling process and sheds light on the interpretation of cyclic SEMs.
  • This paper introduces a probabilistic framework for k-shot image classification. The goal is to generalise from an initial large-scale classification task to a separate task comprising new classes and small numbers of examples. The new approach not only leverages the feature-based representation learned by a neural network from the initial task (representational transfer), but also information about the form of the classes (concept transfer). The concept information is encapsulated in a probabilistic model for the final layer weights of the neural network which then acts as a prior when probabilistic k-shot learning is performed. Surprisingly, simple probabilistic models and inference schemes outperform many existing k-shot learning approaches and compare favourably with the state-of-the-art method in terms of error-rate. The new probabilistic methods are also able to accurately model uncertainty, leading to well calibrated classifiers, and they are easily extensible and flexible, unlike many recent approaches to k-shot learning.
  • Off-policy model-free deep reinforcement learning methods using previously collected data can improve sample efficiency over on-policy policy gradient techniques. On the other hand, on-policy algorithms are often more stable and easier to use. This paper examines, both theoretically and empirically, approaches to merging on- and off-policy updates for deep reinforcement learning. Theoretical results show that off-policy updates with a value function estimator can be interpolated with on-policy policy gradient updates whilst still satisfying performance bounds. Our analysis uses control variate methods to produce a family of policy gradient algorithms, with several recently proposed algorithms being special cases of this family. We then provide an empirical comparison of these techniques with the remaining algorithmic details fixed, and show how different mixing of off-policy gradient estimates with on-policy samples contribute to improvements in empirical performance. The final algorithm provides a generalization and unification of existing deep policy gradient techniques, has theoretical guarantees on the bias introduced by off-policy updates, and improves on the state-of-the-art model-free deep RL methods on a number of OpenAI Gym continuous control benchmarks.
  • Generative Adversarial Networks (GAN) (Goodfellow et al., 2014) are an effective method for training generative models of complex data such as natural images. However, they are notoriously hard to train and can suffer from the problem of missing modes where the model is not able to produce examples in certain regions of the space. We propose an iterative procedure, called AdaGAN, where at every step we add a new component into a mixture model by running a GAN algorithm on a reweighted sample. This is inspired by boosting algorithms, where many potentially weak individual predictors are greedily aggregated to form a strong composite predictor. We prove that such an incremental procedure leads to convergence to the true distribution in a finite number of steps if each step is optimal, and convergence at an exponential rate otherwise. We also illustrate experimentally that this procedure addresses the problem of missing modes.
  • Invariance to nuisance transformations is one of the desirable properties of effective representations. We consider transformations that form a \emph{group} and propose an approach based on kernel methods to derive local group invariant representations. Locality is achieved by defining a suitable probability distribution over the group which in turn induces distributions in the input feature space. We learn a decision function over these distributions by appealing to the powerful framework of kernel methods and generate local invariant random feature maps via kernel approximations. We show uniform convergence bounds for kernel approximation and provide excess risk bounds for learning with these features. We evaluate our method on three real datasets, including Rotated MNIST and CIFAR-10, and observe that it outperforms competing kernel based approaches. The proposed method also outperforms deep CNN on Rotated-MNIST and performs comparably to the recently proposed group-equivariant CNN.
  • We introduce a novel framework for adversarial training where the target distribution is annealed between the uniform distribution and the data distribution. We posited a conjecture that learning under continuous annealing in the nonparametric regime is stable irrespective of the divergence measures in the objective function and proposed an algorithm, dubbed {\ss}-GAN, in corollary. In this framework, the fact that the initial support of the generative network is the whole ambient space combined with annealing are key to balancing the minimax game. In our experiments on synthetic data, MNIST, and CelebA, {\ss}-GAN with a fixed annealing schedule was stable and did not suffer from mode collapse.
  • We propose to fuse two currently separate research lines on novel therapies for stroke rehabilitation: brain-computer interface (BCI) training and transcranial electrical stimulation (TES). Specifically, we show that BCI technology can be used to learn personalized decoding models that relate the global configuration of brain rhythms in individual subjects (as measured by EEG) to their motor performance during 3D reaching movements. We demonstrate that our models capture substantial across-subject heterogeneity, and argue that this heterogeneity is a likely cause of limited effect sizes observed in TES for enhancing motor performance. We conclude by discussing how our personalized models can be used to derive optimal TES parameters, e.g., stimulation site and frequency, for individual patients.