• An important task in early phase drug development is to identify patients, which respond better or worse to an experimental treatment. While a variety of different subgroup identification methods have been developed for the situation of trials that study an experimental treatment and control, much less work has been done in the situation when patients are randomized to different dose groups. In this article we propose new strategies to perform subgroup analyses in dose-finding trials and discuss the challenges, which arise in this new setting. We consider model-based recursive partitioning, which has recently been applied to subgroup identification in two arm trials, as a promising method to tackle these challenges and assess its viability using a real trial example and simulations. Our results show that model-based recursive partitioning can be used to identify subgroups of patients with different dose-response curves and improves estimation of treatment effects and minimum effective doses, when heterogeneity among patients is present.
  • Identifying subgroups, which respond differently to a treatment, both in terms of efficacy and safety, is an important part of drug development. A well-known challenge in exploratory subgroup analyses is the small sample size in the considered subgroups, which is usually too low to allow for definite comparisons. In early phase trials this problem is further exaggerated, because limited or no clinical prior information on the drug and plausible subgroups is available. We evaluate novel strategies for treatment effect estimation in these settings in a simulation study motivated by real clinical trial situations. We compare several approaches to estimate treatment effects for selected subgroups, employing model averaging, resampling and Lasso regression methods. Two subgroup identification approaches are employed, one based on categorization of covariates and the other based on splines. Our results show that naive estimation of the treatment effect, which ignores that a selection has taken place, leads to bias and overoptimistic conclusions. For the considered simulation scenarios virtually all evaluated novel methods provide more adequate estimates of the treatment effect for selected subgroups, in terms of bias, MSE and confidence interval coverage.
  • A common problem in Phase II clinical trials is the comparison of dose response curves corresponding to different treatment groups. If the effect of the dose level is described by parametric regression models and the treatments differ in the administration frequency (but not in the sort of drug) a reasonable assumption is that the regression models for the different treatments share common parameters. This paper develops optimal design theory for the comparison of different regression models with common parameters. We derive upper bounds on the number of support points of admissible designs, and explicit expressions for $D$-optimal designs are derived for frequently used dose response models with a common location parameter. If the location and scale parameter in the different models coincide, minimally supported designs are determined and sufficient conditions for their optimality in the class of all designs derived. The results are illustrated in a dose-finding study comparing monthly and weekly administration.
  • We consider the problem of testing for a dose-related effect based on a candidate set of (typically nonlinear) dose-response models using likelihood-ratio tests. For the considered models this reduces to assessing whether the slope parameter in these nonlinear regression models is zero or not. A technical problem is that the null distribution (when the slope is zero) depends on non-identifiable parameters, so that standard asymptotic results on the distribution of the likelihood-ratio test no longer apply. Asymptotic solutions for this problem have been extensively discussed in the literature. The resulting approximations however are not of simple form and require simulation to calculate the asymptotic distribution. In addition their appropriateness might be doubtful for the case of a small sample size. Direct simulation to approximate the null distribution is numerically unstable due to the non identifiability of some parameters. In this article we derive a numerical algorithm to approximate the exact distribution of the likelihood-ratio test under multiple models for normally distributed data. The algorithm uses methods from differential geometry and can be used to evaluate the distribution under the null hypothesis, but also allows for power and sample size calculations. We compare the proposed testing approach to the MCP-Mod methodology and alternative methods for testing for a dose-related trend in a dose-finding example data set and simulations.
  • Phase II dose finding studies in clinical drug development are typically conducted to adequately characterize the dose response relationship of a new drug. An important decision is then on the choice of a suitable dose response function to support dose selection for the subsequent Phase III studies. In this paper we compare different approaches for model selection and model averaging using mathematical properties as well as simulations. Accordingly, we review and illustrate asymptotic properties of model selection criteria and investigate their behavior when changing the sample size but keeping the effect size constant. In a large scale simulation study we investigate how the various approaches perform in realistically chosen settings. Finally, the different methods are illustrated with a recently conducted Phase II dosefinding study in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
  • In this paper we consider two-stage adaptive dose-response study designs, where the study design is changed at an interim analysis based on the information collected so far. In a simulation study, two approaches will be compared for these type of designs; (i) updating the study design by calculating the maximum likelihood estimate for the dose-response model parameters and then calculating the design for the second stage that is locally optimal for this estimate, and (ii) using the complete posterior distribution of the model parameter at interim to calculate a Bayesian optimal design (i.e. taking into account parameter uncertainty). In particular, for an early interim analysis respecting parameter uncertainty seems more adequate, on the other hand for a Bayesian approach dependency on the prior is expected and an adequately thought-through prior is required. A computationally efficient method is proposed for calculating the Bayesian design at interim based on approximating the full posterior sample using k-means clustering. The sigmoid Emax dose-response model and the D-optimality criterion will be used in this paper.
  • Statistical methodology for the design and analysis of clinical Phase II dose response studies, with related software implementation, are well developed for the case of a normally distributed, homoscedastic response considered for a single timepoint in parallel group study designs. In practice, however, binary, count, or time-to-event endpoints are often used, typically measured repeatedly over time and sometimes in more complex settings like crossover study designs. In this paper we develop an overarching methodology to perform efficient multiple comparisons and modeling for dose finding, under uncertainty about the dose-response shape, using general parametric models. The framework described here is quite general and covers dose finding using generalized non-linear models, linear and non-linear mixed effects models, Cox proportional hazards (PH) models, etc. In addition to the core framework, we also develop a general purpose methodology to fit dose response data in a computationally and statistically efficient way. Several examples, using a variety of different statistical models, illustrate the breadth of applicability of the results. For the analyses we developed the R add-on package DoseFinding, which provides a convenient interface to the general approach adopted here.
  • This paper considers the topic of finding prior distributions when a major component of the statistical model depends on a nonlinear function. Using results on how to construct uniform distributions in general metric spaces, we propose a prior distribution that is uniform in the space of functional shapes of the underlying nonlinear function and then back-transform to obtain a prior distribution for the original model parameters. The primary application considered in this article is nonlinear regression, but the idea might be of interest beyond this case. For nonlinear regression the so constructed priors have the advantage that they are parametrization invariant and do not violate the likelihood principle, as opposed to uniform distributions on the parameters or the Jeffrey's prior, respectively. The utility of the proposed priors is demonstrated in the context of nonlinear regression modelling in clinical dose-finding trials, through a real data example and simulation. In addition the proposed priors are used for calculation of an optimal Bayesian design.
  • Dose-finding studies are frequently conducted to evaluate the effect of different doses or concentration levels of a compound on a response of interest. Applications include the investigation of a new medicinal drug, a herbicide or fertilizer, a molecular entity, an environmental toxin, or an industrial chemical. In pharmaceutical drug development, dose-finding studies are of critical importance because of regulatory requirements that marketed doses are safe and provide clinically relevant efficacy. Motivated by a dose-finding study in moderate persistent asthma, we propose response-adaptive designs addressing two major challenges in dose-finding studies: uncertainty about the dose-response models and large variability in parameter estimates. To allocate new cohorts of patients in an ongoing study, we use optimal designs that are robust under model uncertainty. In addition, we use a Bayesian shrinkage approach to stabilize the parameter estimates over the successive interim analyses used in the adaptations. This approach allows us to calculate updated parameter estimates and model probabilities that can then be used to calculate the optimal design for subsequent cohorts. The resulting designs are hence robust with respect to model misspecification and additionally can efficiently adapt to the information accrued in an ongoing study. We focus on adaptive designs for estimating the minimum effective dose, although alternative optimality criteria or mixtures thereof could be used, enabling the design to address multiple objectives.
  • The Laplace approximation is an old, but frequently used method to approximate integrals for Bayesian calculations. In this paper we develop an extension of the Laplace approximation, by applying it iteratively to the residual, i.e., the difference between the current approximation and the true function. The final approximation is thus a linear combination of multivariate normal densities, where the coefficients are chosen to achieve a good fit to the target distribution. We illustrate on real and artificial examples that the proposed procedure is a computationally efficient alternative to current approaches for approximation of multivariate probability densities. The R-package iterLap implementing the methods described in this article is available from the CRAN servers.