• We consider a communication channel in which the only possible communication mode is transmitting beeps, which reach all the nodes instantaneously. Nodes are anonymous, in that they do not have any individual identifiers. The algorithmic goal is to randomly assign names to the nodes in such a manner that the names make a contiguous segment of positive integers starting from $1$. We give a Las Vegas naming algorithm for the case when the number of nodes $n$ is known, and a Monte Carlo algorithm for the case when the number of nodes $n$ is not known. The algorithms are provably optimal with respect to the expected time $O(n\log n)$, the number of used random bits $O(n\log n)$, and the probability of error.
  • We consider single-hop radio networks with multiple channels as a model of wireless networks. There are $n$ stations connected to $b$ radio channels that do not provide collision detection. A station uses all the channels concurrently and independently. Some $k$ stations may become active spontaneously at arbitrary times. The goal is to wake up the network, which occurs when all the stations hear a successful transmission on some channel. Duration of a waking-up execution is measured starting from the first spontaneous activation. We present a deterministic algorithm for the general problem that wakes up the network in $O(k\log^{1/b} k\log n)$ time, where $k$ is unknown. We give a deterministic scalable algorithm for the special case when $b>d \log \log n$, for some constant $d>1$, which wakes up the network in $O(\frac{k}{b}\log n\log(b\log n))$ time, with $k$ unknown. This algorithm misses time optimality by at most a factor of $O(\log n(\log b +\log\log n))$, because any deterministic algorithm requires $\Omega(\frac{k}{b}\log \frac{n}{k})$ time. We give a randomized algorithm that wakes up the network within $O(k^{1/b}\ln \frac{1}{\epsilon})$ rounds with a probability that is at least $1-\epsilon$, for any $0<\epsilon<1$, where $k$ is known. We also consider a model of jamming, in which each channel in any round may be jammed to prevent a successful transmission, which happens with some known parameter probability $p$, independently across all channels and rounds. For this model, we give two deterministic algorithms for unknown~$k$: one wakes up the network in time $O(\log^{-1}(\frac{1}{p})\, k\log n\log^{1/b} k)$, and the other in time $O(\log^{-1}(\frac{1}{p}) \, \frac{k}{b} \log n\log(b\log n))$ but assuming the inequality $b>\log(128b\log n)$, both with a probability that is at least $1-1/\mbox{poly}(n)$.
  • We consider wireless networks with the SINR model of interference when nodes have very limited individual knowledge and capabilities. In particular, nodes do not know their geographic coordinates and their neighborhoods, nor even the size $n$ of the network, nor can they sense collisions. Each node is equipped only with a unique integer name, where $N$ is an upper bound on their range. We study distributed algorithms for communication problems in the following three settings. In the single-node-start case, when one node starts an execution and the other nodes are awoken by receiving messages from already awoken nodes, we present a randomized broadcast algorithm which wakes up all the nodes in $O(n \log^2 N)$ rounds with high probability. Let $\Delta$ denote the maximum number of nodes that successfully receive a message transmitted by a node when no other nodes transmit. For the synchronized-start case, when all the nodes start an execution simultaneously, we give a randomized algorithm that computes a backbone of the network in $O(\Delta\log^{7} N)$ rounds with high probability. Finally, in the partly-coordinated-start case, when a number of nodes start an execution together and other nodes are awoken by receiving messages from the already awoken nodes, we develop an algorithm that creates a backbone network in time $O(n\log^2 N +\Delta\log^{7} N)$ with high probability.
  • We consider the Do-All problem, where $p$ cooperating processors need to complete $t$ similar and independent tasks in an adversarial setting. Here we deal with a synchronous message passing system with processors that are subject to crash failures. Efficiency of algorithms in this setting is measured in terms of work complexity (also known as total available processor steps) and communication complexity (total number of point-to-point messages). When work and communication are considered to be comparable resources, then the overall efficiency is meaningfully expressed in terms of effort defined as work + communication. We develop and analyze a constructive algorithm that has work $O( t + p \log p\, (\sqrt{p\log p}+\sqrt{t\log t}\, ) )$ and a nonconstructive algorithm that has work $O(t +p \log^2 p)$. The latter result is close to the lower bound $\Omega(t + p \log p/ \log \log p)$ on work. The effort of each of these algorithms is proportional to its work when the number of crashes is bounded above by $c\,p$, for some positive constant $c < 1$. We also present a nonconstructive algorithm that has effort $O(t + p ^{1.77})$.
  • We study deterministic distributed broadcasting in synchronous multiple-access channels. Packets are injected into $n$ nodes by a window-type adversary that is constrained by a window $w$ and injection rates individually assigned to all nodes. We investigate what queue size and packet latency can be achieved with the maximum aggregate injection rate of one packet per round, depending on properties of channels and algorithms. We give a non-adaptive algorithm for channels with collision detection and an adaptive algorithm for channels without collision detection that achieve $O(\min(n+w,w\log n))$ packet latency. We show that packet latency has to be either $\Omega(w \max (1,\log_w n))$, when $w\le n$, or $\Omega(w+n)$, when $w>n$, as a matching lower bound to these algorithms. We develop a non-adaptive algorithm for channels without collision detection that achieves $O(n+w)$ queue size and $O(nw)$ packet latency. This is in contrast with the adversarial model of global injection rates, in which non-adaptive algorithms with bounded packet latency do not exist (Chlebus et al. Distributed Computing 22(2): 93 - 116, 2009). Our algorithm avoids collisions produced by simultaneous transmissions; we show that any algorithm with this property must have $\Omega(nw)$ packet latency.
  • We study broadcast in multiple access channels in dynamic adversarial settings. There is an unbounded supply of anonymous stations attached to a synchronous channel. There is an adversary who injects packets into stations to be broadcast on the channel. The adversary is restricted by injection rate, burstiness, and by how many passive stations can be simultaneously activated by providing them with packets. We consider deterministic distributed broadcast algorithms, which are further categorized by their properties. We investigate for which injection rates can algorithms attain bounded packet latency, when adversaries are restricted to be able to activate at most one station per round. The rates of algorithms we present make the increasing sequence consisting of $\frac{1}{3}$, $\frac{3}{8}$ and $\frac{1}{2}$, reflecting the additional features of algorithms. We show that injection rate $\frac{3}{4}$ cannot be handled with bounded packet latency.
  • We study broadcasting in multiple access channels with dynamic packet arrivals and jamming. Communication environments are represented by adversarial models that specify constraints on packet arrivals and jamming. We consider deterministic distributed broadcast algorithms and give upper bounds on the worst-case packet latency and the number of queued packets in relation to the parameters defining adversaries. Packet arrivals are determined by a rate of injections and a number of packets that can be generated in one round. Jamming is constrained by a rate with which an adversary can jam rounds and by a number of consecutive rounds that can be jammed.
  • We consider Parallel Random Access Machine (PRAM) which has some processors and memory cells faulty. The faults considered are static, i.e., once the machine starts to operate, the operational/faulty status of PRAM components does not change. We develop a deterministic simulation of a fully operational PRAM on a similar faulty machine which has constant fractions of faults among processors and memory cells. The simulating PRAM has $n$ processors and $m$ memory cells, and simulates a PRAM with $n$ processors and a constant fraction of $m$ memory cells. The simulation is in two phases: it starts with preprocessing, which is followed by the simulation proper performed in a step-by-step fashion. Preprocessing is performed in time $O((\frac{m}{n}+ \log n)\log n)$. The slowdown of a step-by-step part of the simulation is $O(\log m)$.
  • The problem of finding a spanning forest of a graph in a distributed-processing environment is studied. If an input graph is weighted, then the goal is to find a minimum-weight spanning forest. The processors communicate by broadcasting. The output consists of the edges that make a spanning forest and have been broadcast on the network. Input edges are distributed among the processors, with each edge held by one processor. The underlying broadcast network is implemented as a multiple-access channel. If exactly one processor attempts to perform a broadcast, then the broadcast is successful. A message broadcast successfully is delivered to all the processors in one step. If more than one processors broadcast simultaneously, then the messages interfere with each other and no processor can receive any of them. Optimality of algorithmic solutions is investigated, by way of comparing deterministic with randomized algorithms, and adaptive with oblivious ones. Lower bounds are proved that either justify the optimality of specific algorithms or show that the optimal performance depends on a class of algorithms.
  • A communication network is called a radio network if its nodes exchange messages in the following restricted way. First, a send operation performed by a node delivers copies of the same message to all directly reachable nodes. Secondly, a node can successfully receive an incoming message only if exactly one of its neighbors sent a message in that step. It is this semantics of how ports at nodes send and receive messages that defines the networks rather than the fact that only radio waves are used as a medium of communication; but if that is the case then just a single frequency is used. We discuss algorithmic aspects of exchanging information in such networks, concentrating on distributed randomized protocols. Specific problems and solutions depend a lot on the topology of the underlying reachability graph and how much the nodes know about it. In single-hop networks each pair of nodes can communicate directly. This kind of networks is also known as the multiple access channel. Popular broadcasting protocols used on such channels are Aloha and the exponential backoff. Multi-hop networks may have arbitrary topology and packets need to be routed hopping through a sequence of adjacent nodes. Distributed protocols run by such networks are usually robust enough not to expect the nodes to know their neighbors. These ad-hoc networks and protocols model the situation when nodes are mobile and do not rely on a fixed infrastructure.
  • We consider deterministic distributed broadcasting on multiple access channels in the framework of adversarial queuing. Packets are injected dynamically by an adversary that is constrained by the injection rate and the number of packets that may be injected simultaneously; the latter we call burstiness. The maximum injection rate that an algorithm can handle in a stable manner is called the throughput of the algorithm. We develop an algorithm that achieves throughput $1$ for any number of stations against leaky-bucket adversaries. The algorithm has $O(n^2+\text{burstiness})$ packets queued simultaneously at any time, where $n$ is the number of stations; this upper bound is proved to be best possible. An algorithm is called fair when each packet is eventually broadcast. We show that no algorithm can be both stable and fair for a system of at least two stations against leaky-bucket adversaries. We study in detail small systems of exactly two and three stations against window adversaries to exhibit differences in quality of broadcast among classes of algorithms. For two stations, we show that fair latency can be achieved by a full sensing algorithm, while there is no stable acknowledgment based algorithm. For three stations, we show that fair latency can be achieved by a general algorithm, while no full sensing algorithm can be stable. Finally, we show that algorithms that either are fair or do not have the queue sizes affect the order of transmissions cannot be stable in systems of at least four stations against window adversaries.
  • We consider synchronous distributed systems in which anonymous processors communicate by shared read-write variables. The goal is to have all the processors assign unique names to themselves. We consider the instances of this problem determined by whether the number $n$ is known or not, and whether concurrently attempting to write distinct values into the same memory cell is allowed or not, and whether the number of shared variables is a constant independent of $n$ or it is unbounded. For known $n$, we give Las Vegas algorithms that operate in the optimum expected time, as determined by the amount of available shared memory, and use the optimum $O(n\log n)$ expected number of random bits. For unknown $n$, we give Monte Carlo algorithms that produce correct output upon termination with probabilities that are $1-n^{-\Omega(1)}$, which is best possible when terminating almost surely and using $O(n\log n)$ random bits.
  • In this article we introduce a new model to study stability in multi-hop wireless networks in the framework of adversarial queueing. In such a model, a routing protocol consists of three components: a transmission policy, a scheduling policy to select the packet to transmit form a set of packets parked at a node, and a hearing control mechanism to coordinate transmissions with scheduling. For such a setting, we propose a definition of universal stability that takes into account not only the scheduling policies (as in the standard wireline adversarial model), but also the transmission policies. First, we show that any scheduling policy that is unstable in the classical wireline adversarial model remains unstable in the multi-hop radio network model, even in scenarios free of inter- ferences. Then, we show that both SIS and LIS (two well-known universally stable scheduling policies in the wireline adversarial model) remain stable in the multi-hop radio network model, provided a proactive hearing control is used. In contrast, such scheduling policies turn out to be unstable when using a reactive hearing control. However, the scheduling policy LIS can be enforced to be universally stable provided ties are resolved in a permanent manner. Such a situation doesn't hold in the case of SIS, which remains unstable regardless of how ties are resolved. Furthermore, for some transmission policies which we call regular, we also show that all scheduling policies that are universally stable when using proactive hearing control (which include SIS and LIS) remain universally stable when using reactive hearing control.
  • An asynchronous system of $n$ processes prone to crashes, along with a number of shared read-write registers, is the distributed setting. We consider assigning integer numbers to processes in an exclusive manner, in the sense that no integer is assigned to two distinct processes. In the problem called Renaming, any $k\le n$ processes, which hold original names from a range $[N]=\{1,\ldots,N\}$, contend to acquire unique integers in a smaller range $[M]$ as new names using some $r$ auxiliary shared registers. We develop a wait-free $(k,N)$-renaming solution operating in $O(\log k (\log N + \log k\log\log N))$ local steps, for $M=O(k)$, and with $r=O(k\log(N/k))$ auxiliary registers. We develop a wait-free $k$-renaming algorithm operating in $O(k)$ time, with $M=2k-1$ and with $r=O(k^2)$ registers. We develop an almost adaptive wait-free $N$-renaming algorithm, with $N$ known, operating in $O(\log^2 k (\log N + \log k\log\log N))$ time, with $M=O(k)$ and with $r=O(n\log(N/n))$ registers. We give a fully adaptive solution of Renaming, with neither $k$ nor $N$ known, having $M=8k-\lg k-1$ as the bound on new names, operating in $O(k)$ steps and using $O(n^2)$ registers. As regards lower bounds, we show that a wait-free solution of Renaming requires $1+\min\{k-2,\log_{2r} \frac{N}{2M}\}$ steps in the worst case. We apply renaming algorithms to obtain solutions to a problem called Store-and-Collect, which is about operations of storing and collecting under additional requirements. We consider the problem called Unbounded-Naming in which processes may repeatedly request new names, while no name can be reused once assigned, so that infinitely many integers need to be exclusively assigned as names in an execution.