• We present the results of a pilot JVLA project aimed at studying the bulk of the radio-emitting AGN population, unveiled by the NVSS/FIRST and SDSS surveys.We obtained A-array observations at the JVLA at 1.4, 4.5, and 7.5 GHz for 12 sources of the SDSS/NVSS sample. The radio maps reveal compact unresolved or slightly resolved radio structures on a scale of 1-3 kpc, with only one exception of a FRI/FRII source extended over $\sim$40 kpc. We isolate the radio core component in most of them. The sample splits into two groups. Four sources have small black hole (BH) masses (mostly $\sim$10$^{7}$ M$_{\odot}$) and are hosted by blue galaxies, often showing evidence of a contamination from star formation to their radio emission and associated with radio-quiet AGN. The second group consists in seven radio-loud AGN, which live in red massive ($\sim10^{11}$ M$_{\odot}$) early-type galaxies, with large BH masses ($\gtrsim$10$^{8}$ M$_{\odot}$), and spectroscopically classified as Low Excitation Galaxies, all characteristics typical of FRI radio galaxies. They also lie on the correlation between radio core power and [O III] line luminosity defined by FRIs. However, they are more core dominated (by a factor of $\sim$30) than FRIs and show a deficit of extended radio emission. We dub these sources 'FR0' to emphasize their lack of prominent extended radio emission, the single distinguishing feature with respect to FRIs. The differences in radio properties between FR0s and FRIs might be ascribed to an evolutionary effect, with the FR0 sources undergoing to rapid intermittency that prevents the growth of large scale structures. In our preferred scenario the lack of extended radio emission in FR0s is due to their smaller jet Lorentz $\Gamma$ factor with respect to FRIs, causing possible instabilities and their premature disruption.[abridged]
  • Wide area X-ray and far infrared surveys are a fundamental tool to investigate the link between AGN growth and star formation, especially in the low-redshift universe (z<1). The Herschel Terahertz Large Area survey (H-ATLAS) has covered 550 deg^2 in five far-infrared and sub-mm bands, 16 deg^2 of which have been presented in the Science Demonstration Phase (SDP) catalogue. Here we introduce the XMM-Newton observations in H-ATLAS SDP area, covering 7.1 deg^2 with flux limits of 2e-15, 6e-15 and 9e-15 erg/s/cm^2 in the 0.5--2, 0.5--8 and 2--8 keV bands, respectively. We present the source detection and the catalogue, which includes 1700, 1582 and 814 sources detected by Emldetect in the 0.5--8, 0.5--2 and 2--8 keV bands, respectively; the number of unique sources is 1816. We extract spectra and derive fluxes from power-law fits for 398 sources with more than 40 counts in the 0.5--8 keV band. We compare the best-fit fluxes with the catalogue ones, obtained by assuming a common photon index of Gamma=1.7; we find no bulk difference between the fluxes, and a moderate dispersion of s=0.33 dex. Using wherever possible the fluxes from the spectral fits, we derive the 2--10 keV LogN-LogS, which is consistent with a Euclidean distribution. Finally, we release computer code for the tools developed for this project.
  • We present Keck spectroscopic observations and redshifts for a sample of 767 Herschel-SPIRE selected galaxies (HSGs) at 250, 350, and 500um, taken with the Keck I Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (LRIS) and the Keck II DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph (DEIMOS). The redshift distribution of these SPIRE sources from the Herschel Multitiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) peaks at z=0.85, with 731 sources at z<2 and a tail of sources out to z~5. We measure more significant disagreement between photometric and spectroscopic redshifts (<delta_z>/(1+z)>=0.29) than is seen in non-infrared selected samples, likely due to enhanced star formation rates and dust obscuration in infrared-selected galaxies. We estimate that the vast majority (72-83%) of z<2 Herschel-selected galaxies would drop out of traditional submillimeter surveys at 0.85-1mm. We estimate the luminosity function and implied star-formation rate density contribution of HSGs at z<1.6 and find overall agreement with work based on 24um extrapolations of the LIRG, ULIRG and total infrared contributions. This work significantly increased the number of spectroscopically confirmed infrared-luminous galaxies at z>>0 and demonstrates the growing importance of dusty starbursts for galaxy evolution studies and the build-up of stellar mass throughout cosmic time. [abridged]
  • Deep radio observations of the galaxy cluster Abell 781 have been carried out using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at 325 MHz and have been compared to previous 610 MHz observations and to archival VLA 1.4 GHz data. The radio emission from the cluster is dominated by a diffuse source located at the outskirts of the X-ray emission, which we tentatively classify as a radio relic. We detected residual diffuse emission at the cluster centre at the level of S(325 MHz)~15-20 mJy. Our analysis disagrees with Govoni et al. (2011), and on the basis of simple spectral considerations we do not support their claim of a radio halo with flux density of 20-30 mJy at 1.4 GHz. Abell 781, a massive and merging cluster, is an intriguing case. Assuming that the residual emission is indicative of the presence of a radio halo barely detectable at our sensitivity level, it could be a very steep spectrum source.
  • We present a multi-epoch and multi-frequency VLBI study of the compact radio source J0650+6001. In VLBI images the source is resolved into three components. The central component shows a flat spectrum, suggesting the presence of the core, while the two outer regions, with a steeper spectral index, display a highly asymmetric flux density. The time baseline of the observations considered to derive the source expansion covers about 15 years. During this time interval, the distance between the two outer components has increased by 0.28+/-0.13 mas, that corresponds to an apparent separation velocity of 0.39c+/-0.18c and a kinematic age of 360+/-170 years. On the other hand, a multi-epoch monitoring of the separation between the central and the southern components points out an apparent contraction of about 0.29+/-0.02 mas, corresponding to an apparent contraction velocity of 0.37c+/-0.02c. Assuming that the radio structure is intrinsically symmetric, the high flux density ratio between the outer components can be explained in terms of Doppler beaming effects where the mildly relativistic jets are separating with an intrinsic velocity of 0.43c+/-0.04c at an angle between 12 and 28 degrees to the line of sight. In this context, the apparent contraction may be interpreted as a knot in the jet that is moving towards the southern component with an intrinsic velocity of 0.66c+/-0.03c, and its flux density is boosted by a Doppler factor of 2.0.
  • Aims: The ``bright'' High Frequency Peakers (HFPs) sample is a mixture of blazars and intrinsically small and young radio sources. We investigate the polarimetric characteristics of 45 High Frequency Peakers, from the ``bright'' HFP sample, in order to have a deeper knowledge of the nature of each object, and to construct a sample made of genuine young radio sources only. Methods: Simultaneous VLA observations carried out at 22.2, 15.3, 8.4 and 5.0 GHz, together with the information at 1.4 GHz provided by the NVSS at an earlier epoch, have been used to study the linearly polarized emission. Results: From the analysis of the polarimetric properties of the 45 sources we find that 26 (58%) are polarized at least at one frequency, while 17 (38%) are completely unpolarized at all frequencies. We find a correlation between fractional polarization and the total intensity variability. We confirm that there is a clear distinction between the polarization properties of galaxies and quasars: 17 (66%) quasars are highly polarized, while all the 9 galaxies are either unpolarized (<0.2%) or marginally polarized with fractional polarization below 1%. This suggests that most HFP candidates identified with quasars are likely to represent a radio source population different from young radio objects.
  • Aims: The knowledge of the properties of the youngest radio sources is very important in order to trace the earliest phase of the evolution of the radio emission. RXJ1459+3337, with its high turnover frequency (~25 GHz) provides a unique opportunity to study this class of extreme objects. Methods: High-sensitivity multi-frequency VLA observations have been carried out to measure the flux-density with high accuracy, while multi-frequency VLBA observations were performed, aimed at determining the pc-scale structure. Archival ROSAT data have been used to infer the X-ray luminosity. Results: The comparison between our new VLA data and those available in the literature shows a steady increment of the flux-density in the optically-thick part of the spectrum and a decrement of the turnover frequency. In the optically-thin regime, the source flux density has already started to decrease. Such a variability can be explained in terms of an adiabatically-expanding homogeneous radio component. The frequency range spanned by our VLBA observations, together with the resolution achieved, allows us to determine the source size and the turnover frequency, and then to derive the magnetic field directly from these observable quantities. The value obtained in this way is in good agreement with that computed assuming equipartition condition. A similar value is also obtained by comparing the radio and X-ray luminosities.
  • We investigate the spectral characteristics of 51 candidate High Frequency Peakers (HFPs), from the ``bright'' HFP sample, in order to determine the nature of each object, and to obtain a smaller sample of genuine young radio sources. Simultaneous multi-frequency VLA observations carried out at various epochs have been used to detect flux density and spectral shape variability in order to pinpoint contaminant objects, since young radio sources are not expected to be significantly variable on such a short time-scale. From the analysis of the spectral variability we find 13 contaminant objects, 11 quasars, 1 BL Lac, and 1 unidentified object, which we have rejected from the sample of candidate young radio sources. The 6 years elapsed between the first and latest observing run are not enough to detect any substantial evolution of the overall spectrum of genuine, non variable, young radio sources. If we also consider the pc-scale information, we find that the total radio spectrum we observe is the result of the superposition of the spectra of different regions (lobes, hot-spots, core, jets), instead of a single homogeneous radio component. This indicates that the radio source structure plays a relevant role in determining the spectral shape also in the rather common case in which the morphology appears unresolved even on high-resolution scales.
  • We constrain the spectral ages for two very asymmetric Compact Symmetric Objects (CSO) from the B3-VLA-CSS sample, and we investigate the role of the ambient medium potentially able to influence the individual source evolution. Multi-frequency VLBA observations have been carried out to study the distribution of the break frequency of the spectra across different regions of each source. From the analysis of synchrotron spectra and assuming an equipartition magnetic field, we find radiative ages of about 2x10^3 and 10^4 years for B0147+400 and B0840+424, respectively. The derived individual hot-spot advance speed is in the range between 0.03c and 0.3c, in agreement with kinematic studies carried out on other CSOs. The very asymmetric morphology found in both sources is likely related to an inhomogeneous ambient medium in which the sources are growing, rather than to different intrinsic hot-spot pressures on the two sides.
  • We present XMM-Newton observations of a complete sample of five archetypal young radio-loud AGN, also known Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) sources. They are among the brightest and best studied GPS/CSO sources in the sky, with radio powers in the range L_{5GHz}=10^{43-44} erg/s and with 4 sources having measured kinematic ages of 570 to 3000 yrs. All sources are detected, and have 2-10 keV luminosities from 0.5 to 4.8x10^{44} erg/s. In comparison with the general population of radio galaxies, we find that: 1) GPS galaxies show a a range in absorption column densities similar to other radio galaxies. We therefore find no evidence that GPS galaxies reside in significantly more dense circumnuclear environment, such that they could be hampered in their expansion. 2) The ratio of radio to X-ray luminosity is significantly higher than for classical radio sources. This is consistent with an evolution scenario in which young radio sources are more efficient radio emitters than large extended objects at a constant accretion power. 3) Taking the X-ray luminosity of radio sources as a measure of ionisation power, we find that GPS galaxies are significantly underluminous in their [OIII]_{5007 Angstrom}, including a weak trend with age. This is consistent with the fact that the Stroemgren sphere should still be expanding in these young objects. This would mean that here we are witnessing the birth of the narrow line region of radio-loud AGN.
  • We analyze Chandra temperature maps for a sample of clusters with high quality radio halo data, to study the origin of the radio halos. The sample includes A520, A665, A754, A773, A1914, A2163, A2218, A2319, and 1E0657-56. We present new temperature maps for all but two of them (A520 and A754). All these clusters exhibit distorted X-ray morphology and strong gas temperature variations indicating ongoing mergers. Some clusters, e.g., A520, A665, 1E0657-56, exhibit the previously reported spatial correlation between the radio halo brightness and the hot gas regions. However, it is not a general feature. While most mergers are too messy to allow us to disentangle the projection effects, we find clear counterexamples (e.g., A754 and A773) where the hottest gas regions do not exhibit radio emission at the present sensitivity level. This cannot be explained by projection effects, and therefore argues against merger shocks -- at least those relatively weak ones responsible for the observed temperature structure in most clusters -- as the main mechanism for the halo generation. This leaves merger-generated turbulence as a more likely mechanism. The two clusters with the clearest radio brightness - temperature correlation, A520 and 1E0657-56, are both mergers in which a small dense subcluster has just passed through the main cluster, very likely generating turbulence in its wake. The maximum radio brightness and the hot gas are both seen in these wake regions. On the other hand, the halos in 1E0657-56 and A665 (both high-velocity mergers) extend into the shock regions in front of the subclusters, where no strong turbulence is expected. Thus, in high-velocity (M=2-3) mergers, both shock and turbulence acceleration mechanisms may be significant.
  • A process, involving the 7Be core excitation in the Coulomb breakup of 8B into p + 7Be has been investigated. From the experimental results recently obtained in RIKEN we have derived the mixing amplitude of the | 7Be(1/2-) X (1p_{3/2}); 2+> configuration in the ground state of 8B. Implications on the evaluation of the S17 at stellar energies are discussed.