• We study the linear polarization of the radio cores of eight blazars simultaneously at 22, 43, and 86 GHz with observations obtained by the Korean VLBI Network (KVN) in three epochs between late 2016 and early 2017 in the frame of the Plasma-physics of Active Galactic Nuclei (PAGaN) project. We investigate the Faraday rotation measure (RM) of the cores; the RM is expected to increase with observing frequency if core positions depend on frequency due to synchrotron self-absorption. We find a systematic increase of RMs at higher observing frequencies in our targets. The RM--$\nu$ relations follow power-laws with indices distributed around 2, indicating conically expanding outflows serving as Faraday rotating media. Comparing our KVN data with contemporaneous optical polarization data from the Steward Observatory for a few sources, we find indication that the increase of RM with frequency saturates at frequencies of a few hundreds GHz. This suggests that blazar cores are physical structures rather than simple $\tau=1$ surfaces. A single region, e.g. a recollimation shock, might dominate the jet emission downstream of the jet launching region. We detect a sign change in the observed RMs of CTA 102 on a time scale of $\approx$1 month, which might be related to new superluminal components emerging from its core undergoing acceleration/deceleration and/or bending. We see indication for quasars having higher core RMs than BL Lac objects, which could be due to denser inflows/outflows in quasars.
  • We report the initial results of our high-cadence monitoring program on the radio jet in the active galaxy M87, obtained by the KVN and VERA Array (KaVA) at 22 GHz. This is a pilot study that preceded a larger KaVA-M87 monitoring program, which is currently ongoing. The pilot monitoring was mostly performed every two to three weeks from December 2013 to June 2014, at a recording rate of 1 Gbps, obtaining the data for a total of 10 epochs. We successfully obtained a sequence of good quality radio maps that revealed the rich structure of this jet from <~1 mas to 20 mas, corresponding to physical scales (projected) of ~0.1-2 pc (or ~140-2800 Schwarzschild radii). We detected superluminal motions at these scales, together with a trend of gradual acceleration. The first evidence for such fast motions and acceleration near the jet base were obtained from recent VLBA studies at 43 GHz, and the fact that very similar kinematics are seen at a different frequency and time with a different instrument suggests these properties are fundamental characteristics of this jet. This pilot program demonstrates that KaVA is a powerful VLBI array for studying the detailed structural evolution of the M87 jet and also other relativistic jets.
  • This study aims to search for the existence of intraday variability (IDV) of BL Lac object S5 0716+714 at high radio frequencies for which the interstellar scintillation effect is not significant. Using the 21-meter radio telescope of the Korean VLBI Network (KVN), we present results of multi-epoch simultaneous dual-frequency radio observations. Single-dish observations of S5 0716+714 were simultaneously conducted at 21.7 GHz (K-band) and 42.4 GHz (Q-band), with a high cadence of 30-60 minute intervals.We observed four epochs between December 2009 and June 2010. Over the whole set of observation epochs, S5 0716+714 showed significant inter-month variations in flux density at both the K- and Q-bands, with modulation indices of approximately 19% for the K-band and approximately 36% for the Q-band. In all epochs, no clear intraday variability was detected at either frequency. The source shows monotonic flux density increase in epochs 1 and 3 and monotonic flux density decrease in epochs 2 and 4. In the flux density increasing phases, the flux densities at the Q-band increase more rapidly. In the decreasing phase, no significant flux density difference is seen at the two frequencies. The situation could be different close to flux density peaks that we did not witness in our observations. We find an inverted spectrum with mean spectral indices of -0.57+-0.13 in epoch 1 and -0.15+-0.11 in epoch 3. On the other hand, we find relatively steep indices of +0.24+-0.14 and +0.17+-0.18 in epochs 2 and 4, respectively. We conclude that the frequency dependence of the variability and the change of the spectral index are caused by source-intrinsic effects rather than by any extrinsic scintillation effect.
  • Radio-loud high-redshift quasars (HRQs), although only a few of them are known to date, are crucial for the studies of the growth of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and the evolution of active galactic nuclei (AGN) at early cosmological epochs. Radio jets offer direct evidence of SMBHs, and their radio structures can be studied with the highest angular resolution using Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). Here we report on the observations of three HRQs (J0131-0321, J0906+6930, J1026+2542) at z>5 using the Korean VLBI Network and VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry Arrays (together known as KaVA) with the purpose of studying their pc-scale jet properties. The observations were carried out at 22 and 43 GHz in 2016 January among the first-batch open-use experiments of KaVA. The quasar J0906+6930 was detected at 22 GHz but not at 43 GHz. The other two sources were not detected and upper limits to their compact radio emission are given. Archival VLBI imaging data and single-dish 15-GHz monitoring light curve of J0906+6930 were also acquired as complementary information. J0906+6930 shows a moderate-level variability at 15 GHz. The radio image is characterized by a core-jet structure with a total detectable size of ~5 pc in projection. The brightness temperature, 1.9x10^{11} K, indicates relativistic beaming of the jet. The radio properties of J0906+6930 are consistent with a blazar. Follow-up VLBI observations will be helpful for determining its structural variation.
  • We present the catalog of the KVN Calibrator Survey (KVNCS). This first part of the KVNCS is a single dish radio survey conducted at 22 (K band) and 43 GHz (Q band) simultaneously using the Korean VLBI Network (KVN) from 2009 to 2011. A total 2045 sources selected from the VLBA Calibrator Survey (VCS) with an extrapolated flux density limit of 100 mJy at K band. The KVNCS contains 1533 sources in the K band with a flux density limit of 70 mJy and 553 sources in the Q band with a flux density limit of 120 mJy; it covers the whole sky down to $-32.^\circ5$ in declination. Five hundred thirteen sources were detected in the K and Q bands, simultaneously; $\sim76\%$ of them are flat-spectrum sources ($-0.5 \leq \alpha \leq 0.5$). From the flux--flux relationship, we anticipated that the most of the radiation of many of the sources comes from the compact components. Therefore, the sources listed in the KVNCS are strong candidates for high frequency VLBI calibrators.
  • Recently, both stellar mass-segregation and binary-fractions were uniformly measured on relatively large samples of Galactic Globular Clusters (GCs). Simulations show that both sizeable binary-star populations and Intermediate-Mass Black Holes (IMBHs) quench mass-segregation in relaxed GCs. Thus mass-segregation in GCs with a reliable binary-fraction measurement is a valuable probe to constrain IMBHs. In this paper we combine mass-segregation and binary-fraction measurements from the literature to build a sample of 33 GCs (with measured core-binary fractions), and a sample of 43 GCs (with a binary fraction measurement in the area between the core radius and the half-mass radius). Within both samples we try to identify IMBH-host candidates. These should have relatively low mass-segregation, a low binary fraction (< 5%), and short (< 1 Gyr) relaxation time. Considering the core binary fraction sample, no suitable candidates emerge. If the binary fraction between the core and the half-mass radius is considered, two candidates are found, but this is likely due to statistical fluctuations. We also consider a larger sample of 54 GCs where we obtained an estimate of the core binary fraction using a predictive relation based on metallicity and integrated absolute magnitude. Also in this case no suitable candidates are found. Finally, we consider the GC core- to half-mass radius ratio, that is expected to be larger for GCs containing either an IMBH or binaries. We find that GCs with large core- to half-mass radius ratios are less mass-segregated (and show a larger binary fraction), confirming the theoretical expectation that the energy sources responsible for the large core are also quenching mass-segregation
  • We present the results of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations using the phase reference technique to detect weak Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) cores in the Virgo cluster. Our observations were carried out using the Korean VLBI Network (KVN). We have selected eight representative radio galaxies, seven Virgo cluster members and one galaxy (NGC 4261) that is likely to be in the background. The selected galaxies are located in a range of density regions showing various morphology in 1.4 GHz continuum. Since half of our targets are too weak to be detected at K-band we applied a phase referencing technique to extend the source integration time by calibrating atmospheric phase fluctuations. We discuss the results of the phase referencing method at high frequency observations and we compare them with self-calibration on the relatively bright AGNs, such as M87, M84 and NGC 4261. In this manuscript we present the radio intensity maps at 22 GHz of the Virgo cluster sample while we demonstrate for first time the capability of KVN phase referencing technique.
  • Simultaneous observations at multiple frequency bands have the potential to overcome the fundamental limitation imposed by the atmospheric propagation in mm-VLBI observations. The propagation effects place a severe limit in the sensitivity achievable in mm-VLBI, reducing the time over which the signals can be coherently combined, and preventing the use of phase referencing and astrometric measurements. We carried out simultaneous observations at 22, 43, 87 and 130 GHz of a group of five AGNs, the weakest of which is ca. 200 mJy at 130 GHz, with angular separations ranging from 3.6 to 11 degrees, using the KVN. We analysed this data using the Frequency Phase Transfer (FPT) and the Source Frequency Phase Referencing (SFPR) techniques, which use the observations at a lower frequency to correct those at a higher frequency. The results of the analysis provide an empirical demonstration of the increase in the coherence times at 130 GHz from a few tens of seconds to about twenty minutes, with FPT, and up to many hours with SFPR. Moreover the astrometric analysis provides high precision relative position measurements between two frequencies, including, for the first time, astrometry at 130 GHz. Finally we demonstrate a method for the generalised decomposition of the relative position measurements into absolute position shifts for bona fide astrometric registration of the maps of the individual sources at multiple frequencies, up to 130 GHz.
  • KaVA (KVN and VERA Array) is a new combined VLBI array with KVN (Korean VLBI Network) and VERA (VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry). First, we briefly review the imaging capabilities of KaVA array which actually achieves more than three times better dynamic range than that achieved by VERA alone. The KaVA images clearly show detailed structures of extended radio jets in AGNs. Next, we represent the key science program to be led by KaVA AGN sub working group. We will conduct the monitoring observations of Sgr A* and M87 because of the largeness of their central super-massive black hole angular sizes. The main science goals of the program are (i) testing magnetically-driven-jet paradigm by mapping velocity fields of the M87 jet, and (ii) obtaining tight constraints on physical properties of radio emitting region in Sgr A*.
  • The radio galaxy 3C84 is a representative of gamma-ray-bright misaligned active galactic nuclei (AGN) and one of the best laboratories to study the radio properties of subparsec scale jets. We discuss here the past and present activity of the nuclear region within the central 1pc and the properties of subparsec-sized components C1, C2 and C3. We compare these results with the high resolution space-VLBI image at 5GHz obtained with the RadioAstron satellite and we shortly discuss the possible correlation of radio emission with the gamma-ray emission.
  • We study the warping and tearing of a geometrically thin, non-self-gravitating disk surrounding binary supermassive black holes on an eccentric orbit. The circumbinary disk is significantly misaligned with the binary orbital plane, and is subject to the time-dependent tidal torques. In principle, such a disk is warped and precesses, and is torn into mutually misaligned rings in the region, where the tidal precession torques are stronger than the local viscous torques. We derive the tidal-warp and tearing radii of the misaligned circumbinary disks around eccentric SMBH binaries. We find that in disks with the viscosity parameter, alpha, larger than a critical value depending on the disk aspect ratio, the disk warping appears outside the tearing radius. This condition is expressed as alpha > sqrt{H/3r} for H/r ~<0.1, where H is the disk scale height. If alpha < sqrt{H/3r}, only the disk tearing occurs because the tidal warp radius is inside the tearing radius, where most of disk material is likely to rapidly accrete onto SMBHs. In warped and torn disks, both the tidal-warp and the tearing radii most strongly depend on the binary semi-major axis, although they also mildly depend on the other orbital and disk parameters. This strong dependence enables us to estimate the semi-major axis, once the tidal warp or tearing radius is determined observationally: For the tidal warp radius of 0.1 pc, the semi-major axis is estimated to be ~10^{-2} pc for 10^7 Msun black hole with typical orbital and disk parameters. We also briefly discuss the possibility that central objects of observed warped maser disks in active galactic nuclei are supermassive black hole binaries.
  • Adding VLBI capability to the SKA arrays will greatly broaden the science of the SKA, and is feasible within the current specifications. SKA-VLBI can be initially implemented by providing phased-array outputs for SKA1-MID and SKA1-SUR and using these extremely sensitive stations with other radio telescopes, and in SKA2 by realising a distributed configuration providing baselines up to thousands of km, merging it with existing VLBI networks. The motivation for and the possible realization of SKA-VLBI is described in this paper.
  • We study a warping instability of a geometrically thin, non-self-gravitating, circumbinary disk around young binary stars on an eccentric orbit. Such a disk is subject to both the tidal torques due to a time-dependent binary potential and the radiative torques due to radiation emitted from each star. The tilt angle between the circumbinary disk plane and the binary orbital plane is assumed to be very small. We find that there is a radius within/beyond which the circumbinary disk is unstable to radiation-driven warping, depending on the disk density and temperature gradient indices. This marginally stable warping radius is very sensitive to viscosity parameters, a fiducial disk radius and the temperature measured there, the stellar luminosity, and the disk surface density at a radius where the disk changes from the optically thick to thin for the irradiation from the central stars. On the other hand, it is insensitive to the orbital eccentricity and binary irradiation parameter, which is a function of the binary mass ratio and luminosity of each star. Since the tidal torques can suppress the warping in the inner part of the circumbinary disk, the disk starts to be warped in the outer part. While the circumbinary disks are most likely to be subject to the radiation-driven warping on a AU to kilo-AU scale for binaries with young massive stars more luminous than 10^4Lsun, the radiation driven warping does not work for those around young binaries with the luminosity comparable to the solar luminosity.
  • The Korean VLBI Network (KVN) is a new mm-VLBI dedicated array with capability for simultaneous observations at multiple frequencies, up to 129 GHz. The innovative multi-channel receivers present significant benefits for astrometric measurements in the frequency domain. The aim of this work is to verify the astrometric performance of the KVN using a comparative study with the VLBA, a well established instrument. For that purpose, we carried out nearly contemporaneous observations with the KVN and the VLBA, at 14/7 mm, in April 2013. The KVN observations consisted of simultaneous dual frequency observations, while the VLBA used fast frequency switching observations. We used the Source Frequency Phase Referencing technique for the observational and analysis strategy. We find that having simultaneous observations results in a superior performance for compensation of all atmospheric terms in the observables, in addition to offering other significant benefits for astrometric analysis. We have compared the KVN astrometry measurements to those from the VLBA. We find that the structure blending effects introduce dominant systematic astrometric shifts and these need to be taken into account. We have tested multiple analytical routes to characterize the impact of the low resolution effects for extended sources in the astrometric measurements. The results from the analysis of KVN and full VLBA datasets agree within 2-$\sigma$ of the thermal error estimate. We interpret the discrepancy as arising from the different resolutions. We find that the KVN provides astrometric results with excellent agreement, within 1-$\sigma$, when compared to a VLBA configuration which has a similar resolution. Therefore this comparative study verifies the astrometric performance of KVN using SFPR at 14/7 mm, and validates the KVN as an astrometric instrument.
  • The Korean very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) network (KVN) and VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA) Array (KaVA) is the first international VLBI array dedicated to high-frequency (23 and 43 GHz bands) observations in East Asia. Here, we report the first imaging observations of three bright active galactic nuclei (AGNs) known for their complex morphologies: 4C 39.25, 3C 273, and M 87. This is one of the initial result of KaVA early science. Our KaVA images reveal extended outflows with complex substructure such as knots and limb brightening, in agreement with previous Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations. Angular resolutions are better than 1.4 and 0.8 milliarcsecond at 23 GHz and 43 GHz, respectively. KaVA achieves a high dynamic range of ~1000, more than three times the value achieved by VERA. We conclude that KaVA is a powerful array with a great potential for the study of AGN outflows, at least comparable to the best existing radio interferometric arrays.
  • We have carried out the first very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) imaging of 44 GHz class I methanol maser (7_{0}-6_{1}A^{+}) associated with a millimeter core MM2 in a massive star-forming region IRAS 18151-1208 with KaVA (KVN and VERA Array), which is a newly combined array of KVN (Korean VLBI Network) and VERA (VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry). We have succeeded in imaging compact maser features with a synthesized beam size of 2.7 milliarcseconds x 1.5 milliarcseconds (mas). These features are detected at a limited number of baselines within the length of shorter than approximately 650 km corresponding to 100 Mlambda in the uv-coverage. The central velocity and the velocity width of the 44 GHz methanol maser are consistent with those of the quiescent gas rather than the outflow traced by the SiO thermal line. The minimum component size among the maser features is ~ 5 mas x 2 mas, which corresponds to the linear size of ~ 15 AU x 6 AU assuming a distance of 3 kpc. The brightness temperatures of these features range from ~ 3.5 x 10^{8} to 1.0 x 10^{10} K, which are higher than estimated lower limit from a previous Very Large Array observation with the highest spatial resolution of ~ 50 mas. The 44 GHz class I methanol maser in IRAS 18151-1208 is found to be associated with the MM2 core, which is thought to be less evolved than another millimeter core MM1 associated with the 6.7 GHz class II methanol maser.
  • We study a warping instability of a geometrically thin, non-self-gravitating disk surrounding binary supermassive black holes on a circular orbit. Such a circumbinary disk is subject to not only tidal torques due to the binary gravitational potential but also radiative torques due to radiation emitted from an accretion disk around each black hole. We find that a circumbinary disk initially aligned with the binary orbital plane is unstable to radiation-driven warping beyond the marginally stable warping radius, which is sensitive to both the ratio of vertical to horizontal shear viscosities and the mass-to-energy conversion efficiency. As expected, the tidal torques give no contribution to the growth of warping modes but tend to align the circumbinary disk with the orbital plane. Since the tidal torques can suppress the warping modes in the inner part of circumbinary disk, the circumbinary disk starts to be warped at radii larger than the marginally stable warping radius. If the warping radius is of the order of 0.1 pc, a resultant semi-major axis is estimated to be of the order of 10^-2 pc to 10^-4 pc for 10^7 Msun black hole. We also discuss the possibility that the central objects of observed warped maser disks in active galactic nuclei are binary supermassive black holes with a triple disk: two accretion disks around the individual black holes and one circumbinary disk surrounding them.
  • We present the results of radio monitoring observations of Sgr A* at 7 mm (i.e. 43 GHz) with VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA), which is a VLBI array in Japan. VERA provides angular resolutions on millisecond scales, resolving structure within ~100 Schwarzschild radii of Sgr A* similar to Very Large Baseline Array (VLBA). We performed multi-epoch observations of Sgr A* in 2005 - 2008, and started monitoring it again with VERA from January 2013 for tracing the current G2 encounter event. Our preliminary results in 2013 show that Sgr A* on mas scales has been in ordinary state as of August 2013, although some fraction of the G2 cloud already passed pericenter of Sgr A* in April 2013. We will continue on monitoring Sgr A* with VERA and newly developed KaVA (KVN and VERA Array).
  • We investigate the relationship between radio power and properties related to active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Radio power at 1.4 or 5 GHz, which has been used in many studies, can be affected by synchrotron self-absorption and free-free absorption in a dense region. On the other hand, these absorption effects get smaller at higher frequencies. Thus, we performed simultaneous observations at 22 and 43 GHz using the Korean VLBI Network (KVN) radio telescope based on a sample of 305 AGN candidates residing in elliptical galaxies from the overlap between the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 and Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters (FIRST). About 37% and 22% of the galaxies are detected at 22 and 43 GHz, respectively. Assuming no flux variability between the FIRST and KVN observation, spectral indices were derived from FIRST and KVN data and we found that over 70% of the detected galaxies have flat or inverted spectra, implying the presence of optically thick compact regions near the centres of the galaxies. Core radio power does not show a clear dependence on black hole mass at either low (1.4 GHz) or high (22 and 43 GHz) frequencies. However, we found that the luminosity of the [OIII] $\lambda$5007 emission line and the Eddington ratio correlate with radio power more closely at high frequencies than at low frequencies. This suggests that radio observation at high frequencies can be an appropriate tool for unveiling the innermost region. In addition, the luminosity of the [OIII] $\lambda$5007 emission line and the Eddington ratio can be used as a tracer of AGN activity. Our study suggests a causal connection between high frequency radio power and optical properties of AGNs.
  • This paper presents the catalog of correlated flux densities in three ranges of baseline projection lengths of 637 sources from a 43 GHz (Q-band) survey observed with the Korean VLBI Network. Of them, 623 sources have not been observed before at Q-band with VLBI. The goal of this work in the early science phase of the new VLBI array is twofold: to evaluate the performance of the new instrument that operates in a frequency range of 22-129 GHz and to build a list of objects that can be used as targets and as calibrators. We have observed the list of 799 target sources with declinations down to -40 degrees. Among them, 724 were observed before with VLBI at 22 GHz and had correlated flux densities greater than 200 mJy. The overall detection rate is 78%. The detection limit, defined as the minimum flux density for a source to be detected with 90% probability in a single observation, was in a range of 115-180 mJy depending on declination. However, some sources as weak as 70 mJy have been detected. Of 623 detected sources, 33 objects are detected for the first time in VLBI mode. We determined their coordinates with the median formal uncertainty 20 mas. The results of this work set the basis for future efforts to build the complete flux-limited sample of extragalactic sources at frequencies 22 GHz and higher at 3/4 of the celestial sphere.
  • We report simultaneous multi-frequency observing performance at 22 and 43 GHz of the 21-m shaped-Cassegrain radio telescopes of the Korean VLBI Network (KVN). KVN is the first millimeter-dedicated VLBI network in Korea having a maximum baseline length of 480 km. It currently operates at 22 and 43 GHz and planed to operate in four frequency bands, 22, 43, 86, and 129 GHz. The unique quasioptics of KVN enable simultaneous multi-frequency observations based on efficient beam filtering and accuarate antenna-beam alignment at 22 and 43 GHz. We found that the offset of the beams is within <5 arcseconds over all pointing directions of antenna. The dual polarization, cooled HEMT receivers at 22 and 43 GHz result in receiver noise temperatures less than 40 K at 21.25-23.25 GHz and 80 K at 42.11-44.11 GHz. The pointing accuracies have been measured to be 3 arcseconds in azimuth and elevation for all antennas. The measured aperture efficiencies are 65%(K)/67%(Q), 62%(K)/59%(Q), and 66%(K)/60%(Q) for the three KVN antennas, KVNYS, KVNUS, and KVNTN, respectively. The main-beam efficiencies are measured to be 50%(K)/52%(Q), 48%(K)/50%(Q), and 50%(K)/47%(Q) for KVNYS, KVNUS, and KVNTN, respectively. The estimated Moon efficiencies are 77%(K)/90%(Q), 74%(K)/79%(Q), and 80%(K)/86%(Q) for KVNYS, KVNUS, KVNTN, respectively. The elevation dependence of the aperture efficiencies is quite flat for elevations > 20 degrees.