• There is a growing need for the ability to analyse interval-valued data. However, existing descriptive frameworks to achieve this ignore the process by which interval-valued data are typically constructed; namely by the aggregation of real-valued data generated from some underlying process. In this article we develop the foundations of likelihood based statistical inference for random intervals that directly incorporates the underlying generative procedure into the analysis. That is, it permits the direct fitting of models for the underlying real-valued data given only the random interval-valued summaries. This generative approach overcomes several problems associated with existing methods, including the rarely satisfied assumption of within-interval uniformity. The new methods are illustrated by simulated and real data analyses.
  • The skew-normal and related families are flexible and asymmetric parametric models suitable for modelling a diverse range of systems. We focus on the highly flexible extended skew-normal distribution, and consider when interest is in the extreme values that it can produce. We derive the well-known Mills' inequalities and ratio for the univariate extended skew-normal distribution and establish the asymptotic extreme value distribution for the maxima of samples drawn from this distribution. We show that the multivariate maximum of a high-dimensional extended skew-normal random sample has asymptotically independent components and derive the speed of convergence of the joint tail. To describe the possible dependence among the components of the multivariate maximum, we show that under appropriate conditions an approximate multivariate extreme-value distribution that leads to a rich dependence structure can be derived.
  • In many settings it is critical to accurately model the extreme tail behaviour of a random process. Non-parametric density estimation methods are commonly implemented as exploratory data analysis techniques for this purpose as they possess excellent visualisation properties, and can naturally avoid the model specification biases implied by using parametric estimators. In particular, kernel-based estimators place minimal assumptions on the data, and provide improved visualisation over scatterplots and histograms. However kernel density estimators are known to perform poorly when estimating extreme tail behaviour, which is important when interest is in process behaviour above some large threshold, and they can over-emphasise bumps in the density for heavy tailed data. In this article we develop a transformation kernel density estimator, and demonstrate that its mean integrated squared error (MISE) efficiency is equivalent to that of standard, non-tail focused kernel density estimators. Estimator performance is illustrated in numerical studies, and in an expanded analysis of the ability of well known global climate models to reproduce observed temperature extremes in Sydney, Australia.
  • Skew-symmetric families of distributions such as the skew-normal and skew-$t$ represent supersets of the normal and $t$ distributions, and they exhibit richer classes of extremal behaviour. By defining a non-stationary skew-normal process, which allows the easy handling of positive definite, non-stationary covariance functions, we derive a new family of max-stable processes - the extremal-skew-$t$ process. This process is a superset of non-stationary processes that include the stationary extremal-$t$ processes. We provide the spectral representation and the resulting angular densities of the extremal-skew-$t$ process, and illustrate its practical implementation (Includes Supporting Information).
  • Extreme values of real phenomena are events that occur with low frequency, but can have a large impact on real life. These are, in many practical problems, high-dimensional by nature (e.g. Tawn, 1990; Coles and Tawn, 1991). To study these events is of fundamental importance. For this purpose, probabilistic models and statistical methods are in high demand. There are several approaches to modelling multivariate extremes as described in Falk et al. (2011), linked to some extent. We describe an approach for deriving multivariate extreme value models and we illustrate the main features of some flexible extremal dependence models. We compare them by showing their utility with a real data application, in particular analyzing the extremal dependence among several pollutants recorded in the city of Leeds, UK.