• The question whether an ontology can safely be replaced by another, possibly simpler, one is fundamental for many ontology engineering and maintenance tasks. It underpins, for example, ontology versioning, ontology modularization, forgetting, and knowledge exchange. What safe replacement means depends on the intended application of the ontology. If, for example, it is used to query data, then the answers to any relevant ontology-mediated query should be the same over any relevant data set; if, in contrast, the ontology is used for conceptual reasoning, then the entailed subsumptions between concept expressions should coincide. This gives rise to different notions of ontology inseparability such as query inseparability and concept inseparability, which generalize corresponding notions of conservative extensions. We survey results on various notions of inseparability in the context of description logic ontologies, discussing their applications, useful model-theoretic characterizations, algorithms for determining whether two ontologies are inseparable (and, sometimes, for computing the difference between them if they are not), and the computational complexity of this problem.
  • We study the problem of learning description logic (DL) ontologies in Angluin et al.'s framework of exact learning via queries. We admit membership queries ("is a given subsumption entailed by the target ontology?") and equivalence queries ("is a given ontology equivalent to the target ontology?"). We present three main results: (1) ontologies formulated in (two relevant versions of) the description logic DL-Lite can be learned with polynomially many queries of polynomial size; (2) this is not the case for ontologies formulated in the description logic EL, even when only acyclic ontologies are admitted; and (3) ontologies formulated in a fragment of EL related to the web ontology language OWL 2 RL can be learned in polynomial time. We also show that neither membership nor equivalence queries alone are sufficient in cases (1) and (3).
  • In 1930s Paul Erdos conjectured that for any positive integer $C$ in any infinite $\pm 1$ sequence $(x_n)$ there exists a subsequence $x_d, x_{2d}, x_{3d},\dots, x_{kd}$, for some positive integers $k$ and $d$, such that $\mid \sum_{i=1}^k x_{i\cdot d} \mid >C$. The conjecture has been referred to as one of the major open problems in combinatorial number theory and discrepancy theory. For the particular case of $C=1$ a human proof of the conjecture exists; for $C=2$ a bespoke computer program had generated sequences of length $1124$ of discrepancy $2$, but the status of the conjecture remained open even for such a small bound. We show that by encoding the problem into Boolean satisfiability and applying the state of the art SAT solvers, one can obtain a discrepancy $2$ sequence of length $1160$ and a proof of the Erd\H{o}s discrepancy conjecture for $C=2$, claiming that no discrepancy 2 sequence of length $1161$, or more, exists. In the similar way, we obtain a precise bound of $127\,645$ on the maximal lengths of both multiplicative and completely multiplicative sequences of discrepancy $3$. We also demonstrate that unrestricted discrepancy 3 sequences can be longer than $130\,000$.
  • In 1930s Paul Erdos conjectured that for any positive integer C in any infinite +1 -1 sequence (x_n) there exists a subsequence x_d, x_{2d}, ... , x_{kd} for some positive integers k and d, such that |x_d + x_{2d} + ... + x_{kd}|> C. The conjecture has been referred to as one of the major open problems in combinatorial number theory and discrepancy theory. For the particular case of C=1 a human proof of the conjecture exists; for C=2 a bespoke computer program had generated sequences of length 1124 having discrepancy 2, but the status of the conjecture remained open even for such a small bound. We show that by encoding the problem into Boolean satisfiability and applying the state of the art SAT solvers, one can obtain a sequence of length 1160 with discrepancy 2 and a proof of the Erdos discrepancy conjecture for C=2, claiming that no sequence of length 1161 and discrepancy 2 exists. We also present our partial results for the case of C=3.
  • We study a logic-based approach to versioning of ontologies. Under this view, ontologies provide answers to queries about some vocabulary of interest. The difference between two versions of an ontology is given by the set of queries that receive different answers. We investigate this approach for terminologies given in the description logic EL extended with role inclusions and domain and range restrictions for three distinct types of queries: subsumption, instance, and conjunctive queries. In all three cases, we present polynomial-time algorithms that decide whether two terminologies give the same answers to queries over a given vocabulary and compute a succinct representation of the difference if it is non- empty. We present an implementation, CEX2, of the developed algorithms for subsumption and instance queries and apply it to distinct versions of Snomed CT and the NCI ontology.
  • In this paper we consider the specification and verification of infinite-state systems using temporal logic. In particular, we describe parameterised systems using a new variety of first-order temporal logic that is both powerful enough for this form of specification and tractable enough for practical deductive verification. Importantly, the power of the temporal language allows us to describe (and verify) asynchronous systems, communication delays and more complex properties such as liveness and fairness properties. These aspects appear difficult for many other approaches to infinite-state verification.
  • Until recently, First-Order Temporal Logic (FOTL) has been little understood. While it is well known that the full logic has no finite axiomatisation, a more detailed analysis of fragments of the logic was not previously available. However, a breakthrough by Hodkinson et.al., identifying a finitely axiomatisable fragment, termed the monodic fragment, has led to improved understanding of FOTL. Yet, in order to utilise these theoretical advances, it is important to have appropriate proof techniques for the monodic fragment. In this paper, we modify and extend the clausal temporal resolution technique, originally developed for propositional temporal logics, to enable its use in such monodic fragments. We develop a specific normal form for formulae in FOTL, and provide a complete resolution calculus for formulae in this form. Not only is this clausal resolution technique useful as a practical proof technique for certain monodic classes, but the use of this approach provides us with increased understanding of the monodic fragment. In particular, we here show how several features of monodic FOTL are established as corollaries of the completeness result for the clausal temporal resolution method. These include definitions of new decidable monodic classes, simplification of existing monodic classes by reductions, and completeness of clausal temporal resolution in the case of monodic logics with expanding domains, a case with much significance in both theory and practice.